Distance Measuring Sensor Shield for Arduino Nano Using GP2Y0D810Z0F

The project published here is a distance measuring sensor shield for Arduino Nano including power driver BJT transistor to drive a load like solenoid, motor or LED. This project can be used as Arduino shield or as stand-alone sensor.

GP2Y0D810Z0F from Sharp is heart of the project, The sensor is a composed of an integrated combination of PD (photo diode) , IRED (infrared emitting diode) and signal processing circuit. The variety of the reflectivity of the object, the environmental temperature and the operating duration does not influence easily to the distance detection because of adopting the triangulation method. The output voltage of this sensor stays high in case an object exists in the specified distance range. So this sensor can also be used as proximity sensor. Output is normally High and it goes low when it detects the object.  The output VO is connected to Analog pin A0 of the Arduino Nano. Q1 Transistor helps to inverse the output which also controls the LED. This inversed output also connected to Analog pin A1 of Arduino. Digital pin D11 goes to base of Q2 power NPN BJT transistor MJD3055. This transistor provided to develop high power load driving application like Auto flush, Auto LED on/off when object is detected etc.

Distance Measuring Sensor Shield for Arduino Nano Using GP2Y0D810Z0F – [Link]

Rotary Encoder with Arduino and Nokia 5110 LCD Tutorial

Today we will take a look at using a rotary encoder with Arduino and displaying rotation data on the Nokia 5110 LCD display.

A rotary encoder is an Electro-mechanical device that converts angular position or the rotation of a shaft into analog or digital values. By turning the shaft to the right or left, we either get an increase or decrease in value. One of the major advantage of rotary encoders is the fact that rotation is limitless. If the maximum position, (which is 20 for the particular rotary encoder used in this tutorial) is reached, the device starts the position counting all over again while the Value attached to the position continues to increase/decrease with every turn of the knob in the same direction. This means we could still keep increasing the value associated with turning the rotary encoder so far we keep rotating in the same direction.

Rotary Encoder with Arduino and Nokia 5110 LCD Tutorial – [Link]

xaVNA – A low cost two port Vector Network Analyzer

xaVNA is a simple and cheap vector network analyzer that allows you to easily tune up antennas, filters, and amplifiers by plugin it to USB. It is able to display smith charts/graphs on the including PC software.

The main board connects to a PC through usb and communicates via a virtual serial port device; the PC software sets the frequency and other parameters by sending two-byte register write commands, and the device sends averaged vector values representing magnitude and phase of measured wave.

The project is open source and available on github and a kickstarter campaign is live with 31 days to go.

Specifications

  • Frequency range: guaranteed 137MHz – 2500MHz, typical 135MHz – 3500MHz
  • Measurement signal level (controlled using on-board switches, iteration 1 board only): -5dBm to 10dBm, with 2dB increments
  • Measurement signal level (controlled using spi interface): -20dBm to 10dBm, with 1dB increments
  • 3 receivers: forward coupled, reverse coupled, through; can measure S11 and S21 of a two port device. To measure S22 and S12 the DUT needs to be manually reversed.

COLIBRÌ: the driver for RGBW LEDs

Boris Landoni @ open-electronics.org designed COLIBRI, a board able to drive 4 color LEDs. He writes:

Recently some multicoloured power LEDs have appeared on the market and, differently from the more common RGB LEDs, they incorporate a white LED, as an addition: they are named RGBW (Red, Green, Blue, White) just because of this. They have been created because, even if in order to obtain a white light it is enough to light red, green and blue LEDs together (the brightness proportion as for red, green and blue will determine the white’s tone, that may be warm or cold), the addition of a white LED allows to obtain some much more “clean” white colours, in comparison with what could be obtained from mixing the three basic colours; it is moreover possible to use all the four LEDs together, in order to obtain a much greater luminous power.

Arduino controlled Dual Mono AK4490 DAC (Part 1)

This article is the first of a series detailing the design and build process of an Arduino controlled Dual Mono AK4490 DAC by DimDim:

The design goal was to do a dual mono design so as to maximize SNR and channel separation. A 4-layer PCB design was chosen so as to have a very solid, low impedance ground plane as well as proper power and signal planes. The I2S, audio signals and power after the local LDO regulators are routed on the top layer, the 2 middle layers are ground and power planes, and the bottom layer serves to route I2C signals and some power lines.

LED Heart Keychain

@ sasakaranovic.com build a heart shaped keychain that flashes 2 LED with the touch of your finger! Source files are available on github.

This one is a very simple but cool project, something that I would recommend to anyone who is interested into DIY electronics, gadgets and learning new stuff in general. It is definitely one of those projects that don’t require too much time but you can learn a lot by making it and also earn a lot of credit by sharing it with your friends and family.

LED Heart Keychain – [Link]

Tritium SBC – Linux/Android Board for just $9

Libre has released a three flavor board called Tritium. The first board is a 32bit Allwinner H2+ based with 512MB onboard memory and costs only $9. The next one is in the range of $19, and is based around the 32-bit Allwinner H3, has 1GB onboard and is capable of 4K30 output via the HDMI socket. The most expensive model is the $29 2GB board, based around the 64-bit Allwinner H5 chip. All three of the boards have a proprietary Mali-400/450 GPU onboard. The boards are available on kickstarter and have 58 days to go.

It can be used to tinker with electronics, teach programming, build media centers, create digital signage solutions, play retro games, establish bi-directional video, and unlock imaginations. It is available in 512MB 32-bit 1080P, 1GB 32-bit 4K30, and 2GB 64-bit 4K30 configurations while utilizing a large existing collaborative ecosystem of parts for creators to build new and exciting products and services.

hackaBLE – tiny nRF52832 BLE development board

hackaBLE uses the Nordic nRF52832 which in turn is based on an ARM Cortex-M4 core. So you can really program it with any ARM compatible programmer. We do have a convenient solution though, in the form of our Bumpy blackmagic probe compatible SWD debugger and our PogoProg.

PulseRain M10 – FPGA Development board is Arduino compatible

Over the years FPGAs have become readily available to the maker community. They are now more accessible than ever as many development boards has seen the light. It’s now possible to embed a soft-core MCU into an FPGA  rather than using a hard-core ASIC MCU and here is where PulseRain comes into play with an open source design down to the silicon level.

The PulseRain M10 board embeds an open source soft MCU core (96 MHz) in an Intel/Altera MAX10 FPGA, while is Arduino compatible. In addition, the soft-core MCU features onboard resources like voice CODEC, microSD socket, SRAM, on-chip ADC, and dual IO voltages. The board will soon be available for funding on crowdsupply.com.

Features & Specifications

  • FPGA: Intel/Altera 10M08SAE144C8G
    • Logic Elements: 8 K
    • Block Memory: 378 Kb
    • User Flash Memory: 32 KB
    • 18 x 18 Multipliers: 24
    • Internal Configuration: 2 (This FPGA does not need external memory for configuration)
    • PLLs: 1
    • On-chip A/D Converter: 12 bit
    • Temperature Sensor: On-chip TSD (Temperature Sensor Diode)
    • Package: 144-pin EQFP
  • Microcontroller: Soft-core FP51-1T, with support package for Arduino IDE
    • Clock Rate: 96 MHz
    • Processor Core: Enhanced 1T 8051, with RISC implementation
    • Throughput: Single clock cycle execution for most instructions
    • Instruction Memory: 32 KB
    • Data Memory: 8 KB
    • On-chip Debugger: Yes (supports code download throughput of 921600 bps)
    • Open Source Compiler: SDCC (Small Device C Compiler)
  • Onboard Peripherals and Components:
    • Voice CODEC: Silicon Lab Si3000, with onboard microphone and speaker jack
    • DTMF Decoder: Available through software library
    • UART/PWM/I2C: The default configuration has 2 UARTs, 6 PWMs and 1 I2C
    • SRAM: 1 Mbit serial SRAM (Microchip 23LC1024)
    • microSD Socket: Molex 472192001
    • OpAmp and Potentiometer for Analog Input: 6 analog input channel, 1 potentiometer on A0
    • USB: USB/UART bridge (FT232R), with 921600 bps throughput
    • JTAG Header: Yes
    • Push Button: 2
    • Oscillator: 12 MHz crystal oscillator, with DIP package
    • LEDs: 6 (2 for USB/UART indication, 1 for IO power, 3 for general purpose)
  • Form Factor and Input/Outputs:
    • Arduino UNO Rev 3 Compatible Dimension: 2.1 inch x 3.2 inch
    • Maximum Height: 0.5 inch
    • IO Pin Map: Compatible with Arduino UNO Rev 3
    • IO Voltage: Dual voltage support (3.3 V / 5 V)
  • Power: 5 V USB or 7-12 VDC jack
  • Host Interface: microUSB

HeartyPatch – Open source ECG patch with Wifi

An ECG patch with HRV monitoring that’s open source, affordable, and Wi-Fi/Bluetooth connected.

HeartyPatch is a completely open source, single-lead, ECG-HR wearable patch with HRV (Heart Rate Variability) analysis. It is based on the popular ESP32 system-on-a-chip. By using low-cost, highly-integrated components, we are able to keep the BOM’s cost low, while the simplicity of the circuit design means future expansion will be easier. HeartyPatch can be used both as a lifestyle device for managing fitness and stress as well as for diagnostics and medical research, with the potential for even more interesting applications.

HeartyPatch – Open source ECG patch with Wifi – [Link]