BML GPIO-14 USB Board for PCs

BML project for using a $2 FTDI FT260Q for adding 14 bits of GPIO to any PC via USB with no device drivers required.

Ever miss the simple days of using a PC’s LPT1 parallel port to bit-bang GPIO over 8 output pins and 4 input pins of the DB-25 connector? I sure do. My first design project as a BSEE graduate in 1993 was to design a LPT1 controlled test fixture for the Motorola MDT-9100-T data terminal (shown below). Those were the days. By multiplexing 12 parallel port pins into 74HC dip CMOS latches and transceivers my test jig tested all the IO signals of the MDT-9100s 386sx motherboard. All of the diagnostic software could be written in C on my Windows 3.1 desktop thanx to this versatile interface. Those were the glorious simple days of computing. Sigh…. Then USB came along and killed the wonderfully easy parallel port interface.

BML GPIO-14 USB Board for PCs – [Link]

AIOT-MSSP01 – AAEON’s Intelligent Vending Development Kit & UP Board

(Taipei, Taiwan – April 24, 2018) – AAEON, a leading developer of industrial computers and intelligent retail systems, releases an updated version of its Intelligent Vending Development Kit. The kit is a complete hardware solution that makes it easier than ever before for retailers to implement the latest smart vending technologies.

The kit includes a vending machine controller unit, a separate UP Board PC unit to handle the interactive retail functions, a motor for the machine’s internal mechanisms, a camera, a QR Code device, and all the cables needed to connect these components. Additional WiFi and Bluetooth connectivity components are also available on request.

AAEON is now offering two versions of its Intelligent Vending Development Kit, but both come with the Windows 10 IoT Enterprise OS and a customer-friendly API pre-installed. The kits also utilize the power of the UP Board and its Intel® Atom™ x5-z8350 processor and DDR3L memory to manage a fast, effective facial recognition program.

As a customer approaches the vending machine, an image of their face is captured and their age range, gender and mood are detected. Based on the results, a particular set of products are recommended. Crucially, the process happens almost instantaneously, so there’s no risk of the customer being inconvenienced.

The latest version of the development kit also incorporates Microsoft Azure and Power BI services. With this service, information about every product sold and the gender, age range and mood of each buyer is collated by Azure and broken down by Power BI’s data analytics tools. The result is real-time inventory control information and a series of insightful customer behavior reports and charts that operators can access at any time. Users who buy this version of the development kit will also receive a 60-day free trial for the Power BI Pro service.

“Intelligent vending machines represent the future of automatic retailing,” AAEON design manufacturing product manager Brenda Huang said. “Increasingly, customers are both expecting and relying on intelligent, interactive systems, and the data these machines collect will also give businesses an edge over their competitors.”

Using a Hall Effect Sensor with Arduino

Hall Effect Sensor

Hi guys, welcome to today’s tutorial. Today we will look at how to use a hall effect sensor with Arduino.

A hall effect sensor is a sensor that varies its output based on the presence or absence of a magnetic field. This means that the output signal produced by a Hall effect sensor is a function of magnetic field density around it. When the magnetic flux density around it exceeds a certain pre-set threshold value, the sensor detects it and generates an output voltage sometimes called the hall voltage to indicate the presence of the magnetic field.

Hall sensors are becoming very popular due to their versatility and they are used in many different applications. One of the popular applications of hall effect sensors is in automotive systems where they are used to detect position, measure distance and speed. They are also used in modern devices like smartphones and computers and also used in different type of switches where the presence of a magnetic field is used to either activate or deactivate a circuit.

Using a Hall Effect Sensor with Arduino – [Link]

Arduino board based on ATmega644p

A DIY Arduino type hardware board based on ATmega644p Atmega1284p

This project is free and based on @MCUDude’s MightyCore which has awesome well designed kits for serious development with AVR’s.

Mightyduino is an Arduino with more memory than an Arduino Pro mini. It can use 644p (64k) or 1284p (128k) chips. Its voltage can be configured by U1 and the frequecy can be configured by the Murata’s ressonator (crystal). It has a power led and another one connected to pin D0. The push button performs reset. DTR pin can be used to external reset. The RAW pin is the input voltage <16v. The VCC pin is the regulator output and IC voltage, it can be loaded up to peak of 500mA.

Arduino board based on ATmega644p – [Link]

Ten USB ports and 12 COM ports mean there are no constraints on the slim type GENE-APL7

(Taipei, Taiwan – April 19, 2018) – AAEON, a leading developer of advanced industrial computing platforms, announces the launch of the GENE-APL7, a subcompact motherboard with an extensive I/O interface for use in the retail and fintech sectors.

The feature-rich GENE-APL7 features support for an enviable 10 USB ports and up to 12 COM ports. The single board computer also boasts one VGA and two LVDS connectors, and customers can change this configuration to incorporate eDP technology. MiniCard and mSATA expansion slots, an 8-bit DIO, and a speaker amplifier are also built into the board. Despite offering such a comprehensive list of features, the GENE-APL7 remains an extremely cost-effective solution.

The board is powered by an Intel® Pentium® N4200 or Celeron® N3350 Processor and has up to 8GB DDR3L memory. Thanks to the low power consumption properties of its CPU and the motherboard’s innovative design layout, the GENE-APL7 is a slim, fanless solution that can be used in applications with severe space constraints.

“With the GENE-APL7, we’ve focused on giving users what they need and removing any unnecessary features,” said Julie Huang, AAEON embedded computing division product manager. “The result is a subcompact board that’s powerful, expandable, competitively priced, and perfect for the target retail and fintech markets.”

Features

  • Intel® Pentium® N4200/ Celeron® N3350 Processor SoC
  • DDR3L 1866 MHz SODIMM x 1, up to 8 GB
  • VGA/LVDS1/LVDS2 (LVDS1 Co-design with eDP, VGA with Internal and Rear Design)
  • SATA 6.0 Gb/s x 1, GPIO x 8
  • USB 3.0 x 2, USB 2.0 x 8, COM up to 12 ports (COM2-5 with 5V/12V/ RI Design)
  • mSATA x 1 (Full size), Mini Card x 1 (Full size) with uIM
  • DC 12V Only, AT/ATX Mode
  • Optional: SPK Amplifier, I2S Design

ADXL356/357 MEMS accelerometers feature low noise, low power solution for Wireless Condition Monitoring nodes via @OEMsecrets @arrowglobal

These accelerometers are built to be intrinsically stable over time and temperature with no calibration required.

ADXL356/357 Accelerometers 

The ADXL356/357 MEMS accelerometers feature low noise, low power and offer an excellent solution for Wireless Condition Monitoring nodes.

ADXL372/375 Accelerometer

Ultralow power, 3-axis, ±200g MEMS accelerometer features deep, multimode output FIFO, several activity modes and comes in a small, thin package.

Get your parts sooner with free 1-day shipping when you spend $50 or more with Arrow.com

Micro Soldering Station for 10$

Transform a cheap USB soldering iron in a powerfull Active tip Soldering Station.

With almost no thermal capacity this station regulates the tip’s temperature instantaneously. Solder larger thermal mass with ease, it’s magic.

Micro Soldering Station for 10$ – [Link]

AtPack: Atmel Pack parser, visualizer and fuse calculator

AtPack – Atmel Pack parser, visualizer and fuse calculator from Vagrearg:

Looking for an up-to-date fuse-calculator for the Atmel(*) AVR chips has been something of a long search. There are several online versions, but they have not been updated to the new chips (like the ATmega328PB).
When you have got an itch, you simply scratch it… Don’t you?
Well, I did, and it resulted in an analysis of the Atmel Pack format, which can be freely downloaded under an Apache 2.0 license. The AtPacks contain a master XML file with device lists and links to each device’s XML file, which in turn describes the entire chip. The format is not that hard to understand and can be easily mangled into something useful. Then, some crude jQuery hacking and many hours later… you know how that works.

AtPack: Atmel Pack parser, visualizer and fuse calculator – [Link]

Lipo Charge/Boost/Protect board in 18650 cell holder format

Peter6960 published a new build:

So couple months ago, GreatScott made a video where he designed a circuit. Nothing too innovative, just the same TP4056 charger the MT3608 Boost combined on one PCB. He did add a Lipo protection circuit though, initially using the same DW01. But then, the Aha moment from this video, he found a footprint compatible IC the FS312F-G – which is set at 2.9v! Way healthier for your cell’s longevity!
First of all I had to redraw all his work in Eagle (As I wont be using a cloud based service like EasyEDA for obvious reasons) and then order the PCBs. I added two boost circuits since I had the board space, as I can imagine needing dual voltages at some point (for example if that reverse LCD needed 12v and the Pi needed 5v – i could run both off one board.

Lipo Charge/Boost/Protect board in 18650 cell holder format – [Link]

PID temperature control with Arduino

PID temperature control with Arduino UNO.

If you want to keep something at a certain temperature, say a block of aluminum, you’ll need a thermocouple and some sort of heating element. While you could turn a heater on and off abruptly in a sequence appropriately known as “bang-bang,” a more refined method can be used called PID, or proportional-integral-derivative control. This takes into account how much the temperature is outside of a threshold, and also how it’s changing over time. [via]

PID temperature control with Arduino – [Link]