With ECC Memory, the COM-APLC6 can be Relied On to Perform in any Environment

(Taipei, Taiwan – July 3, 2018) – AAEON, a leading manufacturer of embedded controllers, launches the COM-APLC6, a powerful COM Express Type 6 module. Responding to customer requirements and market trends, the innovative tech giant has fitted its latest module with a series of features designed to strengthen applications and speed up development processes.

Powered by an Intel Atom E3900 Series processor, the COM-APLC6 can reliably handle huge amounts of data and is therefore well suited for modern IoT applications. The module features two SODIMM sockets that support DDR3L-ECC memory. Most competing products have non-ECC memory, which is less stable and more prone to data loss, especially in harsh environments. By providing a more dependable solution, AAEON is ensuring that your systems run smoothly even when they’re deployed in the field or harsh, factory environments.

The CPU’s increased graphics capabilities mean this controller can also be used in advanced medical imaging applications. The module has three independent display outputs, including DDI, eDP/LVDS, and VGA interfaces. The COM-APLC6, which has an operating temperature range of 0oC to 60oC, houses a micro SD slot, providing additional, swappable storage. There’s also an interruptible GPIO and support for multiple USB slots and SATA slots, making this a highly expandable module.

We do everything we can to help customers cut the length of time their applications are in development,” said David Hung, AAEON embedded computing division product specialist. “In addition to developing cutting-edge hardware, we’ve also updated our EC firmware so users can quickly and easily implement new features.

Fully-integrated smoke detector reduces false alarms

With the introduction of the ADPD188BI, Analog Devices (ADI) kills two birds with one stone: First, this smoke detector meets the latest international regulatory standards. Second, the device that integrates two LEDs, photodiode, and analog front-end (AFE) in a single package, help reduce false alarms often caused by steam and dust.

The ADPD188BI is engineered to meet new UL217 requirements as well as EN54/14604 specifications. Its integrated design uses two colors to separate particle sizes, increasing the ability to detect and classify smoke types and reject nuisance sources.  The ADI solution enables a back-scattering design with closer proximity of the LED to the photodiode, reducing circuit board size and allowing for smaller smoke detectors that are more architecturally compatible for residential and commercial use.

[source: eenewsembedded.com]

Using Waveshare 4.3″ E-paper Display with Arduino

Screen technologies have evolved over the years since the cathode ray tube was first demonstrated in 1897, we have moved from plasma to LCDs, followed by LEDs, OLEDs, and more recently e-paper which is what we will look into today. Electronic paper/e-paper displays are display devices which were created to mimic the appearance of ink on a common paper. Unlike the other kind of displays which emit light, e-paper displays reflect light just like an ordinary paper. This gives e-paper displays a wider viewing angle, ensure they consume less power and makes looking at them easier as it gives the same feel as looking at an ordinary paper without the glare that comes from looking at a screen. The coolest feature of this display is its ability to display the last text or graphics uploaded to it even when it is not connected to power. This helps save a lot of power and is the key feature for most applications for which e-paper displays are deployed.

The popularity of e-paper displays is on the rise (used in Amazon’s Kindle) due to the unique features mentioned above, that’s why, for this tutorial, we will look at how to use e-paper displays in Arduino projects, to give the projects an extra layer of sophistication and coolness.

Using Waveshare 4.3″ E-paper Display with Arduino – [Link]

Infrared Thermometer with Arduino and MLX90614 Temperature Sensor

Most of the temperature measurement techniques around the world require some sort of physical contact between the temperature sensor and the object or environment whose temperature is to be measured, but as technology advanced, this changed too. The need to be able to measure the temperature of an object without physical contact arose. This need brought the measurement of temperature using infrared sensors.

The principle of operation of Infrared thermometers is simple, all bodies at a temperature above 0°Kelvin (absolute zero) emit an infrared energy which can be detected by the infrared thermometer sensor. It’s design includes a lens that focuses the infrared energy being emitted by the object in front of a detector. The detector converts the energy into an electrical signal which then can be passed to a microcontroller to interpret and display in units of temperature after compensating for the variation in ambient temperature.

Today, we will build a DIY Infrared based thermometer using an Arduino Uno, the MLX90614 IR temperature sensor, and a Nokia 5110 LCD display shield to display the measured temperature.

Infrared Thermometer with Arduino and MLX90614 Temperature Sensor – [Link]

LoraDunchy – Arduino Compatibile LoRa module

Lora board with Arduino nano compatibile pinout and simple battery management. Small board with arduino nano compatibile pinout with power management and Murata ABZ LoRa module with STM32L0 microcontroller

Features:

  • LoRa module: Murata ABZ
  • Single cell LiPo cell charger on-board with charging signal internally connected to PA11 (via jumper)
  • Buck/Boost switching power supply for delivering stable 3,3V regardless of the battery voltage
  • Battery fuel gauge on-board to control the real status of the battery

LoraDunchy – Arduino Compatibile LoRa module – [Link]

OPEN MOTOR CONTROL – An open source motor controller for everyone

It is open source and based upon the ATmega32U4 microcontroller, and provided with drivers for two DC brush motors and a stepper motor. It receives commands via USB or serial ports, or via the I²C bus.

For those dealing with robotics, one of the problems to solve is the management of the motors used for the traction, that is to say: how to correctly power the motors needed in order to make your robot advance. If you work with Arduino, the first and immediate solution is to use a shield. Several of them can be found available for sale, from the simplest ones that allow to control separately the two small DC motors, to the most advanced ones that are able to measure the current drawn as well. Regardless of the manufacturer, the shields are all based on the usage of a power driver (usually the L298), that is directly interfaced to Arduino’s PWM outputs, and encircled by a few other components. Surely the usage of a shield is a valid solution, but then we need to use at least four Arduino outputs: usually two to adjust the speed and two for the direction. If, on the other hand, you use a generic microcontroller, or a stand-alone Atmel chip, or a board that is different from Arduino, things get a bit more complicated, since on the market it is difficult to find drivers with a more flexible interface, and the price starts to rise quickly.  If you then have the need to command two motors, things get very complicated, even for those using an Arduino board, because problems arise both on the hardware and on the device programming point of view.

[source: www.open-electronics.org]

Tracksoar V2 – the smallest, lightest, open source APRS tracker

What is Tracksoar

Tracksoar is one of the smallest, lightest, open source APRS trackers available. It makes tracking weather balloons, model rockets, RC aircraft, and anything else that flies simple and easy. It is able to report location, altitude, temperature pressure and humidity to the internet or direct to an amateur radio once a minute for up to twelve hours with just 2xAA batteries. Because Tracksoar is open source you can add your own modules to accommodate custom sensors, inputs or outputs to meet your specific requirements. Tracksoar can also use a range of drop in transmitters to allow for easy world wide operation. By flying Tracksoar on a weather balloon you can reduce the required helium and balloon costs per launch and it can pay for itself with just 2 launches. No other APRS solution offers this level of integration, compact size, and customization. Additionally all profits from Tracksoar sales go to supporting the Santa Barbara Hackerspace and improving the resources we offer to the community.

Tracksoar V2

To make the Tracksoar V2 even more beginner friendly we’ve done away with the serial jumpers and the programming shield. The new Tracksoar is based on the ATmega32u4, which means built in USB which we make accessible via a micro USB port. Since we freed up the serial port we no longer need to use jumpers to connect and disconnect the serial port for programming, one less sticking point while getting started with the Tracksoar.

Here’s a list of the new features and upgrades in the Tracksoar V2:

  • USB Micro connector
  • 4 layer board to improve RF performance
  • Improved battery life
  • GPS power backup
  • Removable mounting points
  • More available GPIO
  • No programming shield or jumpers required
  • New and improved firmware

[source: www.tracksoar.com]

I2C Encoder V2 – Connect multiple rotary encoders on the I2C bus

I2C Encoder V2 is a tiny smart board for connecting multiple rotary encoders on the I2C bus and it’s live on kickstarter.

The I2C Encoder V2 supports various type of rotary encoder with one footprint:

  • Standard mechanical encoder
  • Illuminated RGB encoder
  • Clickable rotary encoder
  • With and without dent

There are also 3 configurable GPIOs that are organized with the same footprint of  RGB LED. You can use them as PWM, I/O or ADC.

Last but not least, it has also 256bytes of EEPROM.

I2C Encoder V2 – Connect multiple rotary encoders on the I2C bus – [Link]

Ethernet Relay board

LAN interface with 4 relays, 8 programmable  I/Os and 4 analog inputs, IoT-ready.

How many times have you read or heard about the Internet of things (Iot)? The Internet of things is an expression that is becoming more and more popular lately; it represents the expansion of the Internet into the world of objects and physical locations. Thanks to this technology, many objects that used to be exclusively passive, can now become interactive and coordinate between themselves and interact with the user; they become more intelligent and thanks to the Internet connection they allow to share generated data with the user or another board that can also be in another continent. However, in this scenario, the term “intelligence” is often misused. In fact, many times the IoT includes not only electronic devices capable of making autonomous decisions in order to simplify our everyday life, but also the plethora of products that used to be stand-alone. For this reason, all we have to do is equipping our older devices with an Internet connection.

Ethernet Relay board – [Link]

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