Home Blog  





9 Feb 2015

obr1660_uvod

Even your device can be more user friendly thanks to various pictograms displayed on Winstar WEG series displays with a great contrast and viewing angle.

100×16 pixels at series Winstar WEG010016 isn´t that much at the first sight. But when we realize, that such display represents a sort of a “replacement” or “upgrade” of a character display (2×16-20 chars.), we´ll find, that it has wide possibilities of usage and it´s able to display much more than a character one.

Naturally, even a character display is able to display pictograms, but they´re limited by a given row or a matrix creating a given character. On the other hand, at a graphic display the whole area is available and naturally – it´s still able to display characters too.

Similarly like WEH series character displays, even the WEG series supports 4/8-bit interface „6800“/“8080“ and they have a built-in universal controller WS0010.
When we add advantages of OLED displays and attractive price, we have in hands interesting, universally usable display.

Small graphic OLED displays for great prices - [Link]

21 Jan 2015

Arduino Nokia 5110 LCD display tutorial #2 – Load Graphics on the display

In this tutorial we are going to learn how to load our custom made graphics into a Nokia 5110 lcd display.

Arduino Nokia 5110 LCD display tutorial - [Link]

7 Jan 2015

sytadin_02

by weirdlab.fr:

This will help to see the state of roads, in live, just need to load your favorite (urban or not) traffic map.

To use the touch screen, we run under a Raspbian distribution, you can download the image file here already configured to work with the XPT2046 LCD Control (most common 3.2 TFT found on ebay) . Extract the image file on a 2Gb mini SD Card, and run the setup config.

Real-Time traffic state with Raspberry Pi in your car - [Link]

31 Dec 2014

DI5391f1sm

by Benabadji Noureddine @ edn.com:

Embedded systems frequently use HD44780-type LCD displays as it is considered the most popular alphanumeric display controller. The interface comprises at least 14 pins: eight for data, three for control (EN, WR, RS), two for power supply (Vdd, Vss), and one for contrast (Vre). Configured in 8-bit mode, it requires at least 10 I/O lines (D0..D7, EN, RS). Configured in 4-bit mode, it requires at least six I/O lines (D4..D7, EN, RS). This last case seems usable when using an 8-pin PICmicro. However, 8-pin PICmicros have one pin as an input-only pin.

One wire brings power & data to LCD module - [Link]


26 Dec 2014

obr1647_1

New 3,2“ and 3,5“ displays from company 4D Systems intended for Raspberry Pi are able to make a complete standalone system from this microcomputer.

Graphic output is always beneficial, enabling to use embedded microcomputer as a user interface (HMI) or at least to display various variables etc. There are many ways to reach it, but probably the most desirable solution would be to connect a display and nothing to solve.

New graphic modules 4DPi-32 and 4DPi-35 belong right to this group of ideal solutions, as they´re directly designed for Raspberry Pi (A,B, B+) – electrically and mechanically, while the I/O connector remains still available.

Simplicity of usage is empowered by a fact, that they don´t require (external) power supply, as they´re powered from the computer itself. Communication is done through a high speed 48 MHz SPI connection. Speed of a built-in processor enables displaying of pictures and videos with up 25 fps speed (even more if images can be compressed). Resistive touch panel enables operation of the whole system without a mouse.

As for the size, there´s only a small difference between 4DPi-32 a 4DPi-35 modules – the biggest difference is in resolution 480 x 320 px (4DPI-35) vs. 320×240 px (4Dpi-32). Both displays display GUI (primary) output of the Raspberry Pi – the same as if we had a monitor connected.

These novelties are already our stable stock item. Detailed information will provide you the 4DPi-32 and 4DPi-35 datasheets.

Add the 4-th dimension to your Raspberry Pi - [Link]

24 Dec 2014

An Arduino pulse sensor project from Bajdi:

I found a little heart rate sensor @ ICstation. It is a clone of the open hardware pulse sensor. The sensor is well documented, and it comes with Arduino and Processing example code.
To try it out I connected the sensor to an ATmega328 running at 3.3V and loaded the example Arduino code. I could now see my heart beat on the Arduino serial monitor :)
I then connected a 2.2″ TFT display to the Arduino and tried to figure out how to display the sensor output on it. Sounds simple but unfortunately it isn’t. Updating the full screen (320×240 pixels) is really slow. So I needed some smarter code to update only the pixels that needed to change. I happened to stumble on Matthew McMillans blog, he wrote some smart code to use a similar display as a speedometer. So I borrowed some of his code and mixed it with the example code of the pulse sensor. You can see the result in the above video.

[via]

Arduino heart rate sensor - [Link]

30 Nov 2014

Did you miss our webinar? Watch the VIDEO – record…

With the Bolymin graphic embedded module it´s possible to focus only on software development – hardware is done..All participants of the webinar could get Bolymin BE635 graphic embedded module and PICkit 3 In-Circuit Debugger with 25% discount.

More about BOLYMIN…


How to effectively handle human-machine interface in your applications? - [Link]

27 Nov 2014

FLNQVLCI2TR1IVC.MEDIUM

by df99 @ instructables.com:

This is an OLED clock I built using an Arduino Micro, a tiny OLED 128×64 display using the SSD1306 controller and I2C interface, and a precision DS3231-based real-time clock module with rechargeable battery backup. It features a menu system for setting the RTC (no serial port or USB required)

DS3231 OLED clock with 2-button menu setting and temperature display - [Link]

22 Nov 2014

obr1459_1

 

Minimal power consumption, slim design and a big amount of available versions with multi-color backlight – these are some benefits of the EADOG series displays.

EADOG series is familiar to many of you and probably it´s your favorite one from these main reasons:

  • displays are unusually flat (thin)
  • the have a very low power consumption of 100-s uA (without backlight)
  • wide possibilities of backlight, monochrome and also RGB
  • some types are well legible even without backlight
  • simple communication through 4/8 bit or SPI interface and newly even I2C

So far, types with up to 128x64px or 3×16 characters were available. The most recent additions to the EADOG family are bigger types with resolution of 160x104px (EADOGXL160), 240x64px (EADOGM240), 240x128px (EADOGXL240) and 4×20 characters (EADOGM204) and appropriate backlight modules EALED66x40, EALED94x40 and EALED94x67. Also these new types maintain a low profile – only 5.8 or 6.5mm with backlighting. A positivity is that even these new types are based on standard LCD controllers.

A guide at a choice of a suitable combination of display +backlight will provide you the application described in our article – Start with the EA DOG displays for free.

Detailed information will provide you the datasheets at particular types.

Industrial applications rely on the EA DOG displays - [Link]

18 Nov 2014

obr1623_uvod

With the Bolymin graphic embedded module it´s possible to focus only on software development – hardware is done.

Term: 2014.11.19 10:00 – 11:30 CET

How to effectively handle human-machine interface in your applications? - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits