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27 Nov 2014

FLNQVLCI2TR1IVC.MEDIUM

by df99 @ instructables.com:

This is an OLED clock I built using an Arduino Micro, a tiny OLED 128×64 display using the SSD1306 controller and I2C interface, and a precision DS3231-based real-time clock module with rechargeable battery backup. It features a menu system for setting the RTC (no serial port or USB required)

DS3231 OLED clock with 2-button menu setting and temperature display - [Link]

22 Nov 2014

obr1459_1

 

Minimal power consumption, slim design and a big amount of available versions with multi-color backlight – these are some benefits of the EADOG series displays.

EADOG series is familiar to many of you and probably it´s your favorite one from these main reasons:

  • displays are unusually flat (thin)
  • the have a very low power consumption of 100-s uA (without backlight)
  • wide possibilities of backlight, monochrome and also RGB
  • some types are well legible even without backlight
  • simple communication through 4/8 bit or SPI interface and newly even I2C

So far, types with up to 128x64px or 3×16 characters were available. The most recent additions to the EADOG family are bigger types with resolution of 160x104px (EADOGXL160), 240x64px (EADOGM240), 240x128px (EADOGXL240) and 4×20 characters (EADOGM204) and appropriate backlight modules EALED66x40, EALED94x40 and EALED94x67. Also these new types maintain a low profile – only 5.8 or 6.5mm with backlighting. A positivity is that even these new types are based on standard LCD controllers.

A guide at a choice of a suitable combination of display +backlight will provide you the application described in our article – Start with the EA DOG displays for free.

Detailed information will provide you the datasheets at particular types.

Industrial applications rely on the EA DOG displays - [Link]

18 Nov 2014

obr1623_uvod

With the Bolymin graphic embedded module it´s possible to focus only on software development – hardware is done.

Term: 2014.11.19 10:00 – 11:30 CET

How to effectively handle human-machine interface in your applications? - [Link]

13 Nov 2014

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by  Ioannis Kedros @ embeddedday.com:

I am very new to the multicopters hobby and a super newbie to the FPV (First Person Viewer) flying. I’ve never watch in real time someone flying through the screen but I’ve watched hundreds of videos online! The best-case scenario is to use some goggles (like the Fat Shark) in order to have a better experience. This will make you believe that you are actually inside the cockpit flying the machine. And that’s awesome!

But sometimes, even when everything looks simple this is not translated to cheap as well! A good FPV system, from the camera on the copter to the radio transmission system and the screen on the ground will cost you sometimes more than $200 (without even taking the price of the goggles into the equation). This is huge for my budget especially when the cost will be mirrored to a hobby of mine! So, I am going to try the most efficient solution!

FPV System - [Link]


12 Nov 2014

While TFTs have been the mainstay of displays for years, OLEDs are becoming more prevalent as their price drops due to the phenomenal increase in quality from TFT to OLED technology. We received this demo board from Newhaven that effectively illustrates side by side the differences between TFT and OLED technology, using a 1.69 inch 160 x 128 OLED display and a 1.8 inch 160 by 128 TFT display.

Tech Lab – Newhaven Full Color OLED Displays - [Link]

4 Nov 2014

rewritablelcd

by Colin Jeffrey @ gizmag.com:

Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) are a common and increasingly pervasive method of displaying information for everything from watches to giant TV screens. Though, like most other displays, LCDs require electrical energy to constantly display an image. Researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, however, have produced an ultra-thin LCD screen prototype that is not only capable of displaying images without continuous power, but in 3D as well.

Energy-efficient 3D display maintains images without power - [Link]

24 Oct 2014

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TinyScreen is a tiny customizable display. Play games, get notifications from your phone and display useful information.

TinyScreen is the new way to visualize your environment. With a beautiful color OLED display, TinyScreen is designed to be used to display information from the TinyDuino platform, which stack together like little electronic Lego’s.

With TinyScreen there are several default apps that will work right out of the box – like a Smart Watch app, a Video player app and a video game app. You can use these default apps with NO PROGRAMMING AT ALL!

Arduino TinyScreen - [Link]

21 Oct 2014

TFT-LCD_3-600x374

LG Display has an excellent article on how they build TFT LCD displays:

Ever wondered how the TV and monitor displays you use every day work? The TFT-LCD manufacturing process consists of a set of processes for producing TFT, color filtering, cell, module and others. LG Display Newsroom gives a detailed, but easy to follow explanation of the entire steps below.

Let’s take a closer look at the production process for a TFT board, the bottom-most layer of an LCD panel. The image above depicts a TFT board, which consists of rows of small rectangular sections that together resembles a chessboard. Each rectangular section is a pixel, and each pixel contains a transistor that controls its function. The TFT process is the process that builds these transistors on top of a glass substrate.

[via]

TFT-LCD Production Process Explained - [Link]

8 Oct 2014

obr1599_1

With the Bolymin BE635 graphic embedded module it´s possible to focus only on software development – hardware is done.

A possibility to interactively adjust various parameters and at the same time to see a “result” of our settings (for example a status of a given device) considerably increases safety and reliability in various industry sectors. That´s probably one of reasons why a graphic output becomes a standard even in devices, where they were recently used very rarely so far.

From the development point of view, one of the key deciding factors is a platform, on which a given system is built (processor, OS).
PIC32 family certainly belongs to popular microcontrollers (32 bit RISC CPU), that´s why the new graphic embedded module Bolymin BE635 addresses all, who know PIC32, or they want to become familiar with it. For everyone, who´ve ever worked with PIC32 family, a development of application will be much easier with BE635, as practically all necessary hardware is on one board and at the same time we get a support in a form of various drivers for communication as well as graphic output. For programming purposes a new Microchip PICkit3 is suitable and SW development can be done in the known environment Microchip MPLAB IDE. BE635 is designed as a universal module, where only a designer decides, how much computing power of a processor will use on which activity (displaying, data processing, external HW control, communication, …), that´s why possibilities of its usage are really very wide.

Compact module (93x67x15mm) with a 3,5“ TFT LCD display (320x240px) is equipped sufficiently, to become attractive. For example:

  • built-in 512kB ISP flash/ 64 kB SRAM/ 16 kB EEPROM
  • support of microSD
  • 1x RS232, 1x SPI, 1x I2C
  • selectable 1x RS232/422/485/USB (depending on a version)
  • 1x 10bit ADC, 12x GPIO
  • libraries for successful programming, drivers for interfaces and a touch panel

BE635 is available in 4 versions, differing by an additional RS232/485/422/USB port. Single supply 5V and easy mechanical assembly by means of a metal frame with mounting holes also belong to pluses of a new BE635. Soon, there will be available also other similar modules with the same functionality but with bigger displays, for example BE657 with a 5,7“ (640x480px) display, thus an application for BE635 will be usable for the BE657 alike.

Detailed information can be found in BE635, BE657 flyers and in the BE635 user manual .

Bolymin BE635 – for all PIC32 lovers - [Link]

29 Sep 2014

by arduboy.com:

Featuring 3 OLED screens on a flexible circuit board, this minimalist electronic wearable is stunningly bright, likes to be touched and features a rechargeable 10 hour battery. Apologies about the hairy arms (and the dubstep)!

This is just a prototype but with a just a little more work this could easily be thinner and more attractive to wear. Be on the look out for a new version with some 3d printed parts to present a more honest take on the bracelet.

From the Makers of Arduboy: Ardubracelet - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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