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9 Nov 2011

embedded-lab.com writes:

HD44780 based LCD displays are very popular for embedded projects because they are cheap, easy to interface, can display characters, consume power lot less than seven-segment displays, and most of the present day compilers have in-built library routines for them. However, the only disadvantage is that they require at least 6 I/O pins of microcontroller. Well, you may ask, isn’t that less than what seven-segment displays require? Yes, that’s true but there are circumstances where you don’t have left enough pins for LCD display.

Why pay for Serial LCDs when you can make your own? - [Link]

2 Nov 2011

A New Angle on Cheap LCDs – [Link]

When viewing LCD monitors from an oblique angle, it is not uncommon to witness a dramatic color shift. Occasionally, this can appear as a total color inversion. This is primarily caused by a polarization asymmetry, where light rays passing through the pixel matrix at oblique angles are influenced by the relative orientation of the liquid crystal (see paper for more details).

Engineers and designers have sought to reduce these effects for more than two decades. This effort has been further driven by the popularity of LCD televisions, which have viewers located at wider angles than seen in typical computing setups. This has led to the emergence of more advanced LCD technologies, such as In-Plane Switching (IPS) and Vertical Alignment (VA) screens, which have superior field of view. However, this benefit comes with a higher price tag, slower refresh rate, and increased power consumption.

We take an opposite stance, embracing these optical peculiarities, and consider how they can be used in productive ways. Our paper discusses how a special palette of colors can yield visual elements that are invisible when viewed straight-on, but visible at oblique angles. In essence, this allows conventional, unmodified LCD screens to output two images simultaneously – a feature normally only available in far more complex setups. We enumerate several applications that could take advantage of this ability.

A New Angle on Cheap LCDs - [Link]

27 Oct 2011

embedded-lab.com writes:

The Amicus18 board is physically compatible with Arduino shields. However, the default PIC processor on the board is a 3.3 V type, which could be an issue while interfacing some of the shields that strictly operate at +5V. As a support to the users of the Amicus18 development board, Gevo Electronics from The Netherlands has designed a special shield, named AmiPIC18 LCD. Although the name says it is a LCD shield, but in real it provides a lot more features, which we will be exploring in this article.

Introducing the AmiPIC18 LCD shield - [Link]

27 Oct 2011

Embedded Lab has just posted a tutorial on how to use the mikroElektronika’s GLCD bitmap editor tool to convert a monochromatic bit map (BMP) image file into a data array so that it could be displayed on a graphics LCD using a microcontroller. The GLCD bitmap editor tool is embedded into mikroElektronika’s compilers and can generate a code equivalent of a BMP image, which can be easily inserted into the microcontroller’s source program.

Converting bitmap image files to GLCD data array - [Link]


22 Oct 2011

anandtech.com writes:

Pretty much ever since the iPhone 4 with retina display was launched, resolutions have played a major role in smartphone market. In September, Samsung unveiled Galaxy S II HD LTE, which sports a 4.65″ 1280×720 display. That was the first smartphone with HD resolution (720p). Now there are already a few phones with HD resolution, for example Samsung Galaxy Nexus and LG Optimus LTE. Higher resolutions are not only courtesy of smartphones as “retina” displays are coming to tablets as well. On May, Samsung showed off a 10.1″ panel with resolution of 2560×1600 – resolution that’s only seen in high-end 30″ monitors.

Toshiba Releases 6.1″ Display with Resolution of 2560×1600 - [Link]

6 Oct 2011

RGB LCD Arduino Intervalometer @ The Custom Geek. [via]

I am getting ready to sell some kits and wanted a good way to photograph the assembly without fumbling around trying to hold a camera in one hand and a project in the other. The answer? An intervalometer. A device that can send an IR signal to my Nikon, triggering the shutter. The video above explains all of the features including; automatic delay calculation, auto stop, multiple LCD and LED feedback options, Li-Po charging, FTDI headers, and manual control via button or plug-in foot switch.

This project will work with most Nikon DSLR cameras without changing anything, but can easily be adapted to work with Canon, Sony, or any camera that will accept an IR remote.

RGB LCD Arduino Intervalometer - [Link]

20 Sep 2011

Nyan Cat – Driving an ‘Adafruit ST7565 Negative LCD Display’ with a Netduino… Fabien writes – [via]

I have been waiting for an excuse to use a Nyan Cat in a blog post and the ‘ST7565 Negative LCD Display’ released by Adafruit being equipped with RGB LED backlights was the perfect occasion. After all, RGB LEDs can create a ‘rainbow’, right? All that’s needed is a cat to go with it and Voila!

Nyan Cat – Driving an ‘Adafruit ST7565 Negative LCD Display’ with a Netduino - [Link]

16 Sep 2011

Cover for Standard 16×2 LCD Module by Bradley @ Thingiverse. [via]

This is a cover/enclosure for a standard 16×2 HD44780 LCD Module, such as this one: adafruit.com/products/181. These 16×2 LCD Modules are great for various projects and come in a variety of display colors.

I needed one for the LCD display on my Ultimaker, so I designed this one using Alibre Design. It even has an handy extra cutout in the side to accommodate a potentiometer for controlling the LCD display contrast.

Print a cover for standard 16×2 LCD module by Bradley - [Link]

15 Sep 2011

adafruit.com writes:

We’ve updated our excellent character LCD tutorial to include a section about RGB-backlit LCDs, with wiring images, video and example code!

Arduino Tutorial – connecting a parallel LCD - [Link]

7 Sep 2011

Using VFD display with Arduino – [via]

Summer of 2010 I picked up an Arduino board from adafruit and took some time to walk through all of the tutorials available with it. Since then I have spent most of my time on other projects including my bachelor’s. Recently I have obtained the Motor Party Pack, LoL Shield Kit, and a 20×2 VFD (Vacuum Fluorescent Display) to go with the original board so my interest is sparked again. I have found that the Motor Party Pack and LoL Shield have adequate instruction and tutorials, but the VFD is lacking in beginner level instructions to get started. As such I have decided to write a tutorial for the 20×2 VFD available through adafruit.

The adafruit VFD is made by Samsung and is model No. 20T202DA2JA, this is really unimportant though as adafruit is nice enough to link you to the spec sheets for both the module and the controller chip. What you would be looking for is the pin-out found on page 4 of the module controller sheet.

Using VFD display with Arduino - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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