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17 May 2014

box

Maybe the most well designed reflow oven controller out there @ andybrown.me.uk:

It’s been so long since I had the idea for this project that I can’t remember why I had the idea in the first place. At least I blame it on the passage of time although this engineer is getting on a bit now so it could easily be memory rot on my part. So here we are then, a reflow oven controller. Let’s quickly recap what a reflow oven is for those that are new around here.

The two main processes used in industry to build printed circuit boards are wave soldering and reflow using a very large industrial oven that you probably can’t afford and if you could afford to buy it you probably couldn’t afford to house or run it.

An open-source Cortex-M0 halogen reflow oven controller with TFT LCD - [Link]

9 May 2014

FTDIdisplay

This week FTDI Chip have announced a range of Arduino-compatible development platforms to support the company’s Embedded Video Engine (EVE) technology. The VM800P series provides engineers with everything necessary to implement Human Machine Interfaces (HMIs) featuring display, audio, touch elements and data processing aspects too.

The units can be programmed using the standard Arduino IDE (using a pre-programmed Arduino-compatible bootloader). In addition to support for various Arduino libraries, every VM800P incorporates an FTDI Chip FT800 EVE graphic controller IC and its FT232R USB interface IC as well as an ATMega328P 8-bit microcontroller running at 16 MHz. Also featured are a touch-enabled display LCD panel, a backlight LED driver, an audio power amplifier and a micro speaker. A choice of 3.5, 4.3 and 5.0-inch display formats is available which have precision fitted bezels to enable operation in industrial environments. The VM800P units also have a USB serial port for firmware upload and application communication, a battery-backed real time clock (RTC) for carrying out system timing and a micro SD socket loaded with a 4GByte SD card containing sample applications. [via]

Embedded Video Engine for Arduino - [Link]

30 Apr 2014

oled_display

by Kalle Hyvönen:

I needed a display for a project of mine and was just going to use a regular HD44780 -based text LCD display, until I spotted some very neat looking TINY OLED-displays from eBay.

The displays are monochrome 128×32 pixel displays with a 4-wire SPI bus and they are around 30x11mm in size (the actual display area is under an inch diagonally!). The exact type of the displays is UG-2832HSWEG04. I found a datasheet for the displays and a datasheet for the actual display controller (SSD1306) and they seemed easy enough to use so I ordered a two of them for just $13.

Using a neat little OLED-display with an Arduino - [Link]

26 Apr 2014

FS80H0VHTVDY4H4.LARGE

This instructable will show you how to build a portable Touch Screen Oscilloscope for less than 40 U$! johnag @ instructables.com writes:

The oscilloscope is one of the most powerful electronic instruments that is available to electronics hobbyist, experimenters, and engineers. It is mainly used to measue time-varying signals. Any time you have a signal that varies with time( slowly, quickly, and /or periodically ) you can use an oscilloscope to measure it , visualize it, and to find any unexpected features in it.

Make an Oscilloscope using the SainSmart Mega2560 - [Link]


7 Apr 2014

DSC00719r2

Martin Thomas shows us how to interface Atmel AVR witg graphic LCDs:

This is a C-library for avr-gcc/avr-libc to access SED1520-based graphics-LCDs. The modules used to develop the library only support “write to LCD”, read-modify- write on the display RAM is not possible. So this Library uses a “framebuffer” which holds the display-content in the AVR’s SRAM. For a 122*32 pixel display around 500 Bytes of SRAM are occupied by the buffer. The library does of cause support modules which can be read in “write-only-mode” (tie the R/W-Pin to GND).

Interfacing Atmel AVR with Graphics Liquid Crystal Displays (GLCDs) - [Link]

1 Apr 2014

F0YJW0THGH6XIA9.MEDIUM

bgyroscope @ www.instructables.com writes:

This instructable will show you how to build your own stopwatch to record multiple splits using an ATmega328 programmable microcontroller. When one presses the start button (or slaps the metal band in my watch), the screen displays the last lap for a second then continues the time on the next lap. It’s great for all you runners out there doing an interval workout.

Lap Stopwatch with ATmega328 Microcontroller - [Link]

19 Mar 2014

lcd3

hackshed.co.uk has a tutorial on how to interface a Nokia 5110 LCD to Arduino:

We purchased one of these very cheap, very cool 84×84 LCD backlit screens off of eBay a couple of weeks ago.

It’s a very nice product for adding visual elements to your projects at a very low price. We paid £3.89 for the screen and it was delivered a few days later.

Take a look below for connection instructions and example code from Adafruit on how to get this up and running with your Arduino.

Getting your Nokia 5110 LCD up and running on an Arduino - [Link]

17 Mar 2014

obr1491_1

4,3″ and 7,0″ LCD “Cape” connected to a BeagleBone module can transform this microcomputer to a standalone module with a graphic output. 

Microcomputers BeagleBone have earned a global popularity and the community of Linux and Android OS users know them well. Accessories (options) to these modules further enhance and simplify their usage in praxis. To these accessories also belong two new LCD modules form company 4D Systems – 4DCAPE-43T and 4DCAPE-70T. LCD modules are suitable for a newer version – BeagleBone Black (BBB) and they are not suitable for the BeagleBone white.

Connecting these LCD modules we gain a complete computer suitable for control of various devices. Color displays provide a quality picture, well legible even at a relatively strong ambient light. 4DCape-43T, 4DCape-70T as well as BeagleBone Black are our standard stock items. 7,0“ type offers besides a bigger display area also an access to BeagleBone pins thanks to additional connectors on the rear side of the display.

4D Systems displays will give a cape to your BeagleBone - [Link]

15 Mar 2014

A tutorial on interfacing LCDs (liquid crystal displays) with Arduino. We take a look at libraries and the role they play…and the potential issues, errors and troubleshooting involved.
We look at several types of displays but concentrate on the 4×20 Sparkfun serial enabled LCD display.

Arduino Tutorial #4 - LCD displays, Libraries and Troubleshooting - [Link]

25 Feb 2014

000Plasma000 @ youtube writes:

Working on a project where you need to display something (like data/debugging info)? Why not use an LCD! In this video, I go through various aspects of controlling the device with an Arduino, including setting different types of cursors, toggling the display and even creating custom characters!

How to Control LCD Displays – Arduino Tutorial - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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