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23 Jan 2012

These displays are small, only about 1″ diagonal, but very readable due to the high contrast of an OLED display. This display is made of 128×32 individual white OLED pixels, each one is turned on or off by the controller chip. Because the display makes its own light, no backlight is required. This reduces the power required to run the OLED and is why the display has such high contrast; we really like this miniature display for its crispness!

Monochrome 128×32 OLED graphic display - [Link]

9 Jan 2012

embedded-lab.com writes:

In the first part of this tutorial, we discussed about Winstar’s WDG0151-TMI GLCD module, which is a 128×64 pixel monochromatic display built with KS0108B and KS0107B compatible display controllers. The module was interfaced to a PIC16F887 microcontroller and a test program was written in C to demonstrate how to implement the KS0108 instruction set in the firmware of PIC to activate display pixels on the screen. We wrote our subroutine programs that would turn the GLCD on, move the display location to a specified row and column, and draw a pixel at a given coordinates. You might have realized it by now that how much of effort is required to write the firmware for just plotting a point on a GLCD screen. Today’s discussion will focus more on using the built-in GLCD library routines of mikroC Pro for PIC compiler, which will make your life a lot easier if you are using a graphical LCD in your project.

Interfacing a KS0108 based Graphics LCD - [Part 1] – [Part 2]

1 Jan 2012

circuitvalley.com writes:

The General purpose 16×2 or 16×1 char LCD are very easy to interface with any microcontroller , and these lcd are really very cheap and thoroughly available in the whole world, but the only problem with these lcd is they require 4 or 8 data lines + 2 or 3 control line to at minimum 6 line and maximum 11 lines are required. that not good because many small package microcontroller like PIC10 ,PIC12,PIC16 from microchip ,MSP430 Texas Instrument and Attiny from Atmel there all microcontroller have either 6 to 15 I/O lines. in this condition this technique will save you many I/O line because in this we use only 2 wires to connect the lcd with any microcontroller.

16×2 Serial LCD using PIC12F675 - [Link]

21 Dec 2011

embedded-lab.com writes:

The use of a graphical LCD (GLCD) drastically changes the look of your project. It provides more freedom for presenting data than the HD44870 based character LCDs. Today we will see how to interface a KS0108 (name of the display controller chip) based GLCD to a PIC microcontroller. This experimental tutorial is divided into two parts. In the first part, we will see how to write a firmware for the PIC microcontroller to initialize the GLCD and send data to plot points and lines on the screen. The second part will focus more on exploring the built-in GLCD Library of mikroC Pro for PIC compiler to display more complex texts and objects. Since GLCDs are real resource hungry devices (in terms of required I/O pins and memory), a bigger size PIC microcontroller (PIC16F887, which has 36 I/O pins and 14KB flash memory) is selected for this experiment. I am using MikroElektronika’s UNI-DS6 development board to demonstrate this project, but the circuit setup can also be made on a breadboard.

Interfacing a KS0108 based Graphics LCD (Part 1) - [Link]


12 Dec 2011

Getting Started- Vacuum Fluorescent Display & Teensyduino | A work in progress….  [via]

This is a quick tutorial on getting a VFD working with an Arduino (or Arduino equivalent system). VFDs are beautiful devices with a wonderful hexagonal mesh of wires and this lovely green/blue glow. Operating at around 5V, they offer a nice alternative to high voltage Nixie tubes, while still retaining a lot of the charm.

This tutorial will show you how to connect a Arduino-like device to a VFD display as well as a basic program to display text.

Vacuum Fluorescent Display & Teensyduino - [Link]

30 Nov 2011

DOG series will start with 3 types: 1×8 character, 2×16 and 3×16 character. Outline dimensions are very compact with 55x27mm and especially designed for handheld applications and low power applications. Thanks to the most modern Chip-On-Glas technology (STN and FSTN) overall height is 2.0mm only. Even together with LED backlight thickness will increase to 5.8mm only. Operating temperature range of –20..+70°C (temperature compensated) is standard.

Standard character height of 5.57 mm for the 2×16 makes „DOG modules“ easy readable. User can decide for 3 different interface 4-Bit, 8-Bit and SPI. No need to say that character set with full 248 ASCII characters is installed. Because of direct placement onto pcb production and mounting cost are unequaled low. No special mounting is required.

Combining various display technologies (positive/negative, blue/green/black) with different backlights (white, blue, amber, yellow/green, red) gives the advantage of many different design looks.

Real 3.3V Displays - [Link]

29 Nov 2011

Graphic solutions from 4D Systems are the proof, that a powerful graphic interface doesn´t have to mean big expenses and a long development time. So, give your applications the 4-th dimension!

Australian company 4D Systems, whose products we added into our offer, specialises in graphic solutions, which are very user-friendly and require a relatively small developing effort in order to reach very decent results.

Basis of 4D Systems graphic solutions represent two powerful chips – Goldelox and Picaso. Chips contain graphic processor, memory and interface for common LCD and OLED displays, and – depending on the type – also a support for a touch panel. Graphic chips and modules with these chips represent a powerful and user friendly platform for creation of graphic interface to a wide range of devices.
A common feature of both chips is, that they can be reconfigured into a slave graphic chip mode with a serial interface – SGC (slave graphics controller) – – for a work with the host microcontroller, or into a stand-alone graphic processor mode – GFX (stand alone host graphics controller). It is possible to change these chip features anytime by a simple reloading of free configuration file.

Goldelox – is a low cost chip supporting a powerful graphics, text, pictures, animations, macros and other. It can be used with a simple serial interface for a work with a microcontroller (SGC version) or as a stand-alone graphic processor (GFX version). It can work with many usual series „80“ LCD and OLED displays, with 8 bit interface. Chip can generate a sound, supports SD cards through SPI interface and many other. Read the rest of this entry »

21 Nov 2011

New graphic displays EA DIP122-5 series with efficient LED backlight are optimized for good legibility even in demanding light conditions like for example at the direct sunlight.

Graphic displays EA DIP1222-5 with a 122×32 pixels resolution feature an excellent contrast and an efficient LED backlight offers great legibility even in a low ambient light environment. They are equipped with a temperature compensation for an increased working temperatures range from -20 to +70°C, without necessity of contrast adjustment. Displays also feature a „superfast liquid technology“, ensuring a sufficiently quick response time even at extremely low temperatures (average 2 sec at -20°C).

Three colour versions are available: yellow/green, amber and blue-white. Yellow-green and amber variant is particularly suitable for outdoor usage and extreme light conditions, while an effective LED backlight enables their usage even in a low ambient light environment. Blue-white veriant is optimized with respect to contrast and is ideally suitable for indoor usage with or without artificial light and when low energy consumption is vital.

Displays contain 2 built-in controllers (PT6250 compatible), while every controller is assigned to 61 columns. For external communication an 8-bit interface is used. An external series resistor or constant current source is all that is needed for the LED background illumination. The displays are easily soldered to the printed circuit board or socket connectors can be used if desired. New graphic displays offer for a customer also a high flexibility in a possibility to use a graphic or a character display module for various versions of a given device. As a character display modules types EA DIP081-CHNLED (1×8), EA DIP162-DHNLED (2×16) a EA DIP204-4HNLED (4×20) with the same casing and pinout can be used. .

Further information offers the DIP122-5 datasheet.

You can read DIP122-5 displays even at the direct sunlight - [Link]

19 Nov 2011

Giorgos Lazaridis writes:

Most of you probably know the popular HD44780 character LCD controller from Hitachi. Usually you find it on LCD display boards with 16 pins. One of these pins is called “Contrast Adjustment” and does exactly this: It adjusts the LCD contrast. This pin requires a voltage level. If a microcontrollers has a Digital to Analog module, then this pin can be directly interfaced with this module. But the D/A module is not very common, instead, the PWM module is.

In such applications, the backlit is usually done with LEDs, so a simple PWM driver can directly adjust the brightness. Unfortunately, the PWM module cannot be directly used to adjust the contrast. So, i made a very simple and small circuit to interface the PWM output of a microcontroller to the contrast adjustment pin of an HD44780 Character LCD.

PWM LCD Contrast Adjustment - [Link]

 

9 Nov 2011

embedded-lab.com writes:

HD44780 based LCD displays are very popular for embedded projects because they are cheap, easy to interface, can display characters, consume power lot less than seven-segment displays, and most of the present day compilers have in-built library routines for them. However, the only disadvantage is that they require at least 6 I/O pins of microcontroller. Well, you may ask, isn’t that less than what seven-segment displays require? Yes, that’s true but there are circumstances where you don’t have left enough pins for LCD display.

Why pay for Serial LCDs when you can make your own? - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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