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24 Feb 2012

Sergei Bezrukov writes:

Controlling big LED displays that use several LEDs for lighting each segment is a certain challenge. The problem is that the voltage drop on display segments is well above the maximum voltage of microcontrollers. This project describes an approach to this problem based on source and sink drivers TLC59210 and TLC59213 manufactured by Texas Instruments.

Big LED clock with automatic brightness control - [Link]

24 Feb 2012

The μLCD43(GFX) is an intelligent graphics display that harnesses the power to deliver a diverse range of features in a single, compact cost effective unit. Embedded at the heart of the design is the PICASO-GFX2 processor, which is driven by a highly optimized virtual core engine; EVE (Extensible Virtual Engine).

An extensive range of hardware and software peripherals have been integrated into the design, to give the user freedom to adapt the module to suit almost any application. Features include; a 4.3” TFT 480×272 touch screen display, audio, micro-SD card connector, an expansion port along with a series of GPIO, I2C pins and serial comms. The μLCD43(GFX) serves as the perfect solution to be deployed at the forefront of any product design, requiring a brilliance of colour, animation or images on a 4.3’’ widescreen display.

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11 Feb 2012

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

Here is a hack to extract, and use the LCD from a cheap picture-frame key chain. The project involved desoldering the LCD from its mainboard and building a breakout for it. With the help of a DSO it was possible to find out the pin-out for the LCD.

The AVR library used to drive this LCD is available for download at the bottom of the source article. You can check out a video of this project below.

Re-purposing an LCD from a cheap picture-frame key chain - [Link]

10 Feb 2012

New graphic display EA DIP180B-5NL brings a high contrast, small power consumption and a fast response. And what is important for the most of people – it is also available with a touch panel.

Display EA DIP180B-5NLWTP was designed for use in industrial control panels. That´s why it is available with an analogue resistive touch panel. This enables to combine control of a device and display of information into a single unit. EA DIP180B-5NLWTP is a graphic display with 180×32 pixels resolution. It contains 3 integrated graphic controllers SED1520 type (or compatible) used to control left, center and right sections of the display. White LED backlight provides crystal-clear picture and excellent readability under all light conditions.

Touch panel is linked to an external controller or a controller with analogue inputs. Touch panel operates similarly like a potentiometer – if a voltage is connected to the „Top-Bottom“ input of the controller, a voltage proportionate to Y (vertical) position is read by a microcontroller from the „Left-Right“ input. By the same process can be a horizontal – X position of a contact determined. Display provides a high level of contrast and a fast response thanks to the use of an LCD „supertwist“ technology. Even at extremely low temperatures of -20°C, the response time is a sufficient 2.5 sec. Module features an automatic temperature compensation, that´s why they don´t require any external contrast compensation during operation. Together with a wide specified temperature range from -20 to +70 °C, the display is ideal for various industrial applications. To fix the module mechanically, it is necessary only to solder pins directly to a PCB, without a need to use screws or other mechanical components.

Touch the EA DIP180 display - [Link]


1 Feb 2012

 

Arup wrote a guest post about his Nokia LCD breakout board:

I designed a simple Nokia LCD Breakout board which allows you to interface any Nokia 6100 compatible display to microcontroller like PIC and AVR. The board itself provides 6.8volts for the backlight by a simple boost converter built up using a common 555 timer IC. There’s a switch to choose whether you want to work with 5V logic, or with 3.3V logic. [via]

Simple Nokia LCD breakout board - [Link]

29 Jan 2012

Programming of a graphic interface perhaps cannot be any simpler. Company 4D Systems brings to developers a new powerful graphic editor, which further shifts borders of simplicity and speed at a creation of a graphic output.

4D ViSi tool enables to very easily and intuitively arrange graphic control and displaying elements into the layout which we wish to achieve on the 4D Systems display modules. As a result, this way you will create the graphic interface very quickly and you can fully focus on the main – the application itself. In other words – you can put your effort to what the application “has to do” and not “how it should look”.

4D ViSi tool is a part of the 4D Workshop3 IDE – Alpha program, which is free to download. 4D ViSi is a powerful SW tool, which enables an immediate overview of your desired graphic layout for 4D Systems display modules. 4D ViSi contains a set of various dials, gauges and meters, which can be simply dragged and dropped onto the desired place. Every item has wide possibilities of adjustment. Without necessity to always reload the source code to a display module, you have a possibility to see every change on a monitor of your computer and all relevant code is inserted into the program at one click. In the enclosed video you can gain a closer view of the work in this program.

Focus on application itself and the 4D ViSi will take care about its look - [Link]

23 Jan 2012

These displays are small, only about 1″ diagonal, but very readable due to the high contrast of an OLED display. This display is made of 128×32 individual white OLED pixels, each one is turned on or off by the controller chip. Because the display makes its own light, no backlight is required. This reduces the power required to run the OLED and is why the display has such high contrast; we really like this miniature display for its crispness!

Monochrome 128×32 OLED graphic display - [Link]

9 Jan 2012

embedded-lab.com writes:

In the first part of this tutorial, we discussed about Winstar’s WDG0151-TMI GLCD module, which is a 128×64 pixel monochromatic display built with KS0108B and KS0107B compatible display controllers. The module was interfaced to a PIC16F887 microcontroller and a test program was written in C to demonstrate how to implement the KS0108 instruction set in the firmware of PIC to activate display pixels on the screen. We wrote our subroutine programs that would turn the GLCD on, move the display location to a specified row and column, and draw a pixel at a given coordinates. You might have realized it by now that how much of effort is required to write the firmware for just plotting a point on a GLCD screen. Today’s discussion will focus more on using the built-in GLCD library routines of mikroC Pro for PIC compiler, which will make your life a lot easier if you are using a graphical LCD in your project.

Interfacing a KS0108 based Graphics LCD - [Part 1] – [Part 2]

1 Jan 2012

circuitvalley.com writes:

The General purpose 16×2 or 16×1 char LCD are very easy to interface with any microcontroller , and these lcd are really very cheap and thoroughly available in the whole world, but the only problem with these lcd is they require 4 or 8 data lines + 2 or 3 control line to at minimum 6 line and maximum 11 lines are required. that not good because many small package microcontroller like PIC10 ,PIC12,PIC16 from microchip ,MSP430 Texas Instrument and Attiny from Atmel there all microcontroller have either 6 to 15 I/O lines. in this condition this technique will save you many I/O line because in this we use only 2 wires to connect the lcd with any microcontroller.

16×2 Serial LCD using PIC12F675 - [Link]

21 Dec 2011

embedded-lab.com writes:

The use of a graphical LCD (GLCD) drastically changes the look of your project. It provides more freedom for presenting data than the HD44870 based character LCDs. Today we will see how to interface a KS0108 (name of the display controller chip) based GLCD to a PIC microcontroller. This experimental tutorial is divided into two parts. In the first part, we will see how to write a firmware for the PIC microcontroller to initialize the GLCD and send data to plot points and lines on the screen. The second part will focus more on exploring the built-in GLCD Library of mikroC Pro for PIC compiler to display more complex texts and objects. Since GLCDs are real resource hungry devices (in terms of required I/O pins and memory), a bigger size PIC microcontroller (PIC16F887, which has 36 I/O pins and 14KB flash memory) is selected for this experiment. I am using MikroElektronika’s UNI-DS6 development board to demonstrate this project, but the circuit setup can also be made on a breadboard.

Interfacing a KS0108 based Graphics LCD (Part 1) - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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