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11 Mar 2015

pizzicato-digital-radio

by Colin Jeffrey @ gizmag.com:

For the first time in history, a prototype radio has been created that is claimed to be completely digital, generating high-frequency radio waves purely through the use of integrated circuits and a set of patented algorithms without using conventional analog radio circuits in any way whatsoever. This breakthrough technology promises to vastly improve the wireless communications capabilities of everything from 5G mobile technology to the multitude devices aimed at supporting the Internet of Things (IoT).

World’s first fully digital radio transmitter built purely from microprocessor technology – [Link]

10 Mar 2015

AM_transmitter

Bring back the nostalgia with a tube transmitter! Are you interested in building this AM shortwave transmitter? Most parts used are still available, download circuit diagram for details. You can find more RF projects here: www.stationqrp.com

AM shortwave transmitter – [Link]

2 Mar 2015

HEF4016BP

One of the simplest digital modulation schemes in current use is the Frequency-shift keying (FSK). FSK is similar to Frequency Modulation or FM except that the modulating signal is a binary pulse stream that varies between two discrete voltage levels rather than a continuously changing analog waveform. In FSK, two discrete frequencies are used to represent the binary digits 0 and 1.

The heart of the circuit consists of two Wien-bridge oscillators built using a dual op amp LM1458, for the two frequencies. The two frequencies are enabled corresponding to digital data using two switches in HEF4016BP. The control lines of these switches are logically inverted with respect to each other using one of the switches in HEF4016BP as an inverter, so as to enable only one oscillator output at a time. The digital bit stream is used to control the analog switches as shown. Since the switching frequency limit of HEF4016BP is 40 MHz, high-data rates can be easily accommodated. This method comes in handy when expensive FSK generator chips are not readily available; also, the components used in this circuit are easily available off the shelf and are quite cheap.

FSK was originally used to transmit teleprinter messages by radio (RTTY) but can be used for most other types of radio and landline digital telegraph. Currently, FSK is commonly used in Caller ID and remote metering applications.

Low-cost FSK Generator – [Link]

24 Feb 2015

ge-rfid-explosives

By David Szondy @ gizmag.com:

A global economy brings many benefits, but it also makes international terrorism extremely difficult to combat. With more goods passing through the world’s shipping terminals and airports than ever before, hunting explosives with large, static detectors or teams of inspectors armed with detecting devices and reagents is a bottleneck that increases the chances of evasion. To help US counterterrorism efforts, GE has developed RFID stickers that act as wireless, battery-free explosives detectors that can be placed almost anywhere.

GE RFID tech turns stickers into explosives detectors – [Link]


16 Feb 2015

An active bandpass filter can be wide-band or narrow-band as needed.  If the higher -3dB frequency divided by the lower -3dB frequency is greater than 1.5 then a wide-band filter is needed.    An effective and easily understood active wide-band filter can consist of merely a low-pass and high-pass filter in series.   The high-pass and low-pass filters are share the same design, with resistors and capacitors in the same positions but reversed for each type of filter.

Bandpass Filter – [Link]

12 Feb 2015

2015-01-31-14.48.49

Kenneth made a 2m low pass filter and wrote a post on his blog detailing its assembly:

I’ve been playing with the DRA818V modules that have been making quite a stir in the amateur radio world at the moment. I haven’t gotten one on a spectrum analyzer yet, but I have reason to believe that it will require a low pass filter to be RF legal. I’ll write more about that once I get a look at it, but figured I’d first built myself a low pass filter in case I need it (if not for these modules, but some other VHF project in the future).
My process for building a low pass filter went as follows:
Select the type of filter and cutoff frequency desired
Look up normalized coefficients in the ARRL Handbook
Divide these coefficients by the cutoff frequency
Convert the inductances into turns on some core and capacitors into the nearest values
Build the filter

[via]

Designing and building a 2m low pass filter – [Link]

26 Dec 2014

hc-05-breadboard-600x339

Phillipe Cantin writes:

So you want to two HC-05 modules to automatically connect together, as soon as they’re powered up and with zero code? Well this is your lucky day since this can be done using the AT+BIND command.
Let’s do this thing!
For this, you will need:
1 Arduino (I’m using UNO)
2 HC-05 modules
1 breadboard
Wires
Arduino IDE (I’m using version 1.0.5-r2)

[via]

HC-05 Bluetooth link with zero code – [Link]

9 Dec 2014

15965425911_12418d58ef_z-600x398

Dilshan Jayakody published a new build, a VHF Aircraft radio communications receiver:

This is simple radio receiver project which is capable to receive aviation radio voice signals which are transmit between 118MHz to 138MHz in AM (A3E). We got initial idea of this project by reading Sverre Holm’s (LA3ZA) article about “cheap VHF receiver project”. Like LA3ZA’s original article this project is also based on Samsung’s KA22429 FM radio receiver IC.
KA22429 is low voltage FM radio receiver system developed by Samsung for portable radio receivers and as described by Holm’s it can push into VHF region by changing few values in its original circuit. In this project we redesign the schematic and PCB with some of those changes and now it can directly tune into aviation band with minimum number of adjustments.

[via]

VHF Aircraft radio communications receiver – [Link]

4 Dec 2014

thumb.ready

by hforsten.com:

I’ve for some time now wanted to do more RF design. Although I have taken some RF design courses, I haven’t actually made a single RF design before. But you can’t learn without doing and inspired by the MIT coffee can radar designed by Gregory Charvat, I figured that building a radar should be a doable project that would offer some challenge while also having some real world use.

The simplest radar is a continuous wave Doppler radar, which continuously transmit a constant frequency signal. This signal reflects from a moving target and Doppler shift causes reflected signal to change frequency. This reflected signal is then received and mixed with the transmitted signal. Mixer product is the difference of the frequencies which is proportional to the speed of the target. This kind of radar is very simple to make, in fact there are even some children’s toys. Unfortunately it can’t detect the range of the target and isn’t that exiting.

6 GHz frequency modulated radar – [Link]

14 Nov 2014

rf-wave-circulator

by Colin Jeffrey @ gizmag.com:

In the world of electronic components, there are many devices out there that do their job well and reliably, but are almost never heard of – even though they may be vital to equipment that plays a role in our technology-driven lives. The radio frequency (RF) circulator is just such a device: it has simply done its job as a nondescript box of gubbins buried in radio communications systems, quietly directing radio frequency signals to the places they should go. Now researchers at the University of Texas have given the RF circulator a makeover. Not only is the new prototype smaller, lighter, and cheaper, it’s also claimed to be easily adapted to different frequencies on the fly, which is something the old style circulator cannot do.

New RF circulator to run rings around old technology – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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