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25 Nov 2014

picture

This project provides some lighting effect by the blinking pattern of the bulbs connected at its output. Up to 8 Bulbs can be connected in between connector CN2 to CN9 and AC power to control them should be connected at Connector CN10. DC Power should be applied at Connector CN11 in accordance with the polarity marked on this connector. Care should be taken while using this it as it contains Main Power on the board.

Microcontroller based running light controller - [Link]

24 Nov 2014

FZLXPGWI2Q1H6GS.MEDIUM

by FabricateIO @ instructables.com:

Smart lightbulbs cost your firstborn child. Which is a shame, because smart lights unlock tremendous potential for home automation, energy savings, and all sorts of cool projects.

If only there was a way to control your lights without breaking the bank…

And now there is! For $19 on Amazon, you can get a 4-lightbulb kit from China that ordinarily is limited to 4 channels from a single remote…but with some creative hacking, can be used to control an unlimited number of channels using an arduino and a very simple RF module!

Cheap Arduino Controlled Light Sockets - [Link]

6 Nov 2014

new controller

by jptds.blogspot.co.uk:

It’s not often that I finish the various small projects I undertake. Tesla coils, mass spectrometers, automated tomato plant watering systems, homebrew heaters have all been conceived and sometimes parts bought and assembled with some even making it as far as working. This project however made it all the way to finished.

Bike Light Controller Re-Design - [Link]

20 Aug 2014

buitenlicht2

by  Deddieslab :

I have a couple of front door LED lights which I would like to switch on automatically during the evening/night. The two conventional methods that are commonly available had their disadvantages:

A timer switch is the easiest and cheapest solution, but doesn’t take into account day light savings. Besides that, in Einhoven, the Netherlands where I live in december the sun sets around 16:30 while in June it doesn’t get dark before 22:00. A simple timer doesn’t take that into account either.

Since you only want the lights on when it gets dark, instead of time you can also use a light sensor to distinguish day and night. You have these front door lights that have this built in. The problem that I had with these devices is that they start bouncing (‘flickering’) around sunset/sunrise. They constantly turn on/off which causes damage to the LED lights I was using. This cost me already several expensive led lights.

Frontdoor light switch based on local sunset/sunrise - [Link]


4 Aug 2014

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by dreded @ dredx.com:

In my home I have a fairly long hallway that has light switches at either end but 99% of the time we enter the hallway from the middle where there is no switch. So I decided I needed to do something about this as walking down a dark hallway all the time was annoying.

I have seen a fair number of people use an arduino or even a standalone ATTiny85 with a El cheapo HC-SR501 which can be found on ebay for about $1.25 each and I find these things work fantastic, they have an excellent range and detection spread.

Motion activated lighting without a Micro-Controller - [Link]

28 Jul 2014

ap_ti_slva650

App note (PDF) on automobile flashers from Texas Instruments:

This Application note presents the design of a low cost, flasher circuit with short circuit protection. The design incorporates the entire recommended design feature set for two wheeler flashers and includes low/high voltage operation, half load frequency doubling, and short circuit protection.

[via]

App note: Design of a low cost, 45W flasher with short circuit protection using LM2902 - [Link]

11 Jul 2014

FX4KRUGHXDPDTSL.MEDIUM

Mr.Fishers3 @ instructables.com writes:

Ever looked at a lightbulb and thought that doesn’t look too complicated, I bet I could make one? With this Instructable you can!

This lightbulb is made entirely out of simple, mostly household materials requiring very little in special equipment. The basic construction includes a glass jar filled with CO2 and a graphite filament(Pencil Lead). This makes it a carbon filament bulb analogous to those made by Edison before tungsten became the norm.

Homemade Lightbulb - [Link]

30 May 2014

llcomplete

by ludens.cl

Building flashlights seems to be a fixation of mine. I built my first one at age 5 or so, and now that I’m nearing ten times that age, I’m still building flashlights. This time the project of choice was a high power LED flashlight with several interesting features:

A high power LED flashlight - [Link]

7 Apr 2014

This GU10 LED spot light is cheap (£3 including postage) and bright. But it’s also lethal! There’s a 50% chance of putting live mains within a few microns of the metal casing (which is what you’ll be holding when you insert it) and there’s no earth to protect you. It’s like playing Russian Roulette with 240v AC mains. This sort of thing gives new technology a bad name. Avoid it if you want to stay alive.

Dangerous GU10 LED Spot Light is Cheap and Bright but could Kill You – Seriously - [Link]

2 Dec 2013

Application:

A project with only 2 parts, but is great for addressing an everyday situation that is irritating at best and dangerous at worst.  This circuit protects the bulb in flashlights from high switch-on current to make the bulb last longer.

Description:

For a standard incandescent flashlight, this is a easy little modification make your flashlight bulbs last longer.  High powered flashlights typically run their bulbs hot to get a brighter light from them.  They also have a much lower on-resistance when cold, so that when you turn them on, the bulb passes a much higher current than it was designed for.  This is why the most common time for a bulb failure is when turning it on.

The transistor and resistor limit the current while turning on the circuit and protect the bulb from an initial high current turn on.  A simple resistor in series with the bulb might be a tempting option, but there are a couple problems with that approach.  Just adding a resistor would reduce the voltage available to the bulb, and aid longevity, but that would reduce the brightness.  The resistor would also be wasting energy getting hot instead of using that energy for light.  This solution is better in that it limits current at startup and wastes very little energy when in use and when off.

In this application, it might be easier to insert the batteries in the flashlight “backwards” so the circuit connections and parts have the best fit in the body of the flashlight.  Flashlight design was stagnant for decades, but now there are many new technologies available, and in some cases, it can even be easy to bring some of them to an older one you already have.  In addition to this circuit, you could also take advantage of newer LED and battery technology to really increase the brightness, “on” time, and lamp life of your old flashlight.

Soft Start For Flashlights - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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