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23 Oct 2014

2-freescaleint

by phys.org:

Freescale Semiconductor today introduced the FXTH87 tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) family, which is the smallest integrated package TPMS solution available at an extremely light weight of 0.3 grams. The FXTH87 family is 50 percent smaller than competing products, helping designers reduce overall bill of materials costs. Freescale’s newest TPMS system-in-package solution provides low power consumption combined with the highest level of functional integration in one package, featuring a dual-axis accelerometer architecture, pressure and temperature sensor, integrated MCU, RF transmitter and low frequency receiver.

Freescale introduces world’s smallest integrated tire pressure monitoring system - [Link]

20 Oct 2014

app

An app note on Gamma-photon radiation detector (PDF) by Maxim:

A PIN photodiode, four low-noise op amps and a comparator are used to detect individual photons of gamma radiation. The schematic, design considerations and component selection are discussed.

[via]

Gamma-photon radiation detector - [Link]

14 Oct 2014

DI5470f1

by Jordan Dimitrov @ edn.com:

While most carbon dioxide sensors use IR technology, electrochemical sensors are a serious competitor because of their high sensitivity, wide measurement range, and low price. As a rule, electrochemical sensors connect to a microcontroller through a buffer amplifier with an extremely low bias current (<1pA). The micro is needed to linearize the logarithmic response of the sensor. A good example of this approach is the SEN-000007 module from Sandbox Electronics, which uses an MG-811 CO2 sensor from Hanwei Electronics. Reference 1 reveals the circuits and the code, but does not specify accuracy.

Antilog converter linearizes carbon dioxide sensor - [Link]

1 Oct 2014

15181617420_19ac5491cc

Ioannis Kedros writes:

It’s been a long time since I’ve post a new hobby project of mine! I decided that is time to upload a new one! Like my Sensor Stick module this project will be about sensors as well.

You can find multiple modules out there with various sensing ICs that almost all of them look exactly the same! They are ugly and without properly markings on their surface.

For example, some of those don’t have the input voltage range on the PCB or the pin out names or even the sensor address (in the case of a digital I2C sensors for example). In order to find that info, you have to download files, unzip them, look the schematics of the module then the datasheet of the sensor etc. A time consuming method especially for a quick and dirty prototype!

embeddedday.com – Sensor Modules - [Link]


18 Sep 2014

ds18b20_packages

Davide Gironi writes:

DS18B20 is a programmable resolution 1-wire digital thermometer.
It has an operating temperature range of -55°C to +125°C and is accurate to ±0.5°C over the range of -10°C to +85°C.
This library is an AVR implementation to retrive temperature from DS18B20.

Built using the reference document: “Using DS18B20 digital temperature sensor on AVR microcontrollers” by Gerard Marull Paretas, 2007.

[via]

A DS18B20 1-wire digital thermometer AVR ATmega library - [Link]

3 Sep 2014

tiny-ATtiny-Node

Tiny ATtiny Node with temperature sensor project at Arduino Praxis:

Tiny sensor board with ATtiny84 and RFM12B Transceiver. The size of the PCB is 25 x 30mm, sightly larger than a canadian quarter coin.

[via]

Tiny ATtiny Node - [Link]

31 Aug 2014

cmos-sensor

by elektor.com:

Cambridge Sensors Ltd have announced the appointment of the ASE group to assemble and test there latest tiny (currently the world’s smallest) gas sensor. The 2.0mm x 3.0mm cavity DFN package developed together with ASE enables the integration of gas sensors into devices such as smartphones, tablets and wearable devices where it has previously not been physically possible.

The CCS800 product family of ultra-low power miniature gas sensors can be used for detecting Ethanol (Alcohol) and hazardous gases such as Carbon Monoxide (CO) and a wide range of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) including Formaldehyde. According to Fuyu Shih the vice president of ASE Europe: “The Global emergence of sophisticated electronics geared towards improving lifestyle and efficiency is fuelling the sensor market, making it one of the fastest growing areas of innovation within the semiconductor industry”.

Smartphone Nose - [Link]

14 Aug 2014

photo_th

Project is based on Holtek’s IC HT7610A, which is a CMOS LSI chip designed for use in automatic PIR lamp, flash or buzzer control. It can operate in 3-wire configuration for relay applications. In our project we have used relay instead of Traic to connect any kind of load in output, HT7610B IC is suitable for traic and HT7610A for Relay application. The chip is equipped with operational amplifiers, a comparator, timer, a zero crossing detector, control circuit, a voltage regulator, a system oscillator, and an output timing oscillator.

Its PIR sensor detects infrared power variations induced by the motion of a human body and transforms it to a voltage variation. If the PIR output voltage variation conforms to the criteria (refer to the functional description), the lamp is turned on with an adjustable duration. The circuit doesn’t required step down transformer and can work directly by applying 110V AC or 220V AC (Capacitor C7 needs to change for 220V AC (0.33uF/275V) and 110V AC (0.68uF/275V)

PIR Sensor - [Link]

14 Aug 2014

FreeAccel

by elektor.com:

Freescale have introduced a new range of 3-axis accelerometers offering high sensitivity at low power consumption. According to Freescale the FXLN83xxQ family is capable of detecting acceleration information often missed by less accurate sensors commonly used in consumer products such as smartphones and exercise activity monitors. In conjunction with appropriate software algorithms its improved sensitivity allows the new sensor to be used for equipment fault prognostication (for predictive maintenance), condition monitoring and medical tamper detection applications.

High sensitivity Accelerometer Family - [Link]

1 Aug 2014

mysensors]

Learn how to create your own low cost wireless sensors and connect them to the world.

Store your sensor data at home or in our cloud. We provide fancy graphs and other great online tools to help you manage and analyze your sensor data!

mysensors.org – Learn how to create your own low cost wireless sensors - [Link]

 



 
 
 

 

 

 

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