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1 Jul 2015

C053

RTC Add-On Board offers an easy way to interface a standard I2C RTC IC type DS1307, into your project.

DS1307 Real Time Clock Module – [Link]

4 Jun 2015

clock-1024x383

by sdgelectronics.co.uk:

I recently found six 2.3″ red 7 segment displays in my collection which I purchased from Rapid Electronics when they were clearing out non-RoHS stock. Since I have no clock at my work bench I decided to construct one from some prototyping pad board, a Microchip PIC18F26K20 microcontroller and a Dallas DS32KHZ temperature compensated 32.768kHz crystal.

6 Digit LED Clock – [Link]

19 May 2015

screen-shot-2015-05-07-at-8.41.37-pm

by kevinrye.net:

I was extremely satisfied (and proud) of the way that the enclosure turned out for the rework of my 7490 Clock. The electronics on the other hand, is another story.

The innards of that clock were from a prototype I built in 2001. It was a proof of concept. It led to the design of what would become an extremely well-polished and accurate clock.

Since it was one of the first things I ever built, I decided to put it in an enclosure of its own and consider it too as a finished product.

The problem was that the prototype never ran properly. It worked, just not as well as it should. Needless to say, I tried to fix it in the way of an Arduino upgrade. On paper everything should run perfectly, but in the real world, it just doesn’t. The clock bounces all over the place. It’s more of a random number generator than a clock. I really thought that moving away from the 60Hz line signal as a timebase to a solid 1Hz signal from a DS3231 RTC would solve all my problems. At the end of the day, it boils down to the fact that it’s all soldered together on a DIY homebrew PCB. The holes that I drilled are too big for the pins; resulting in some pretty shoddy-looking soldering. It’s a noisy circuit, and I’m sure there’s some grounding issues in there too.

Large 7-Segment Clock – [Link]

9 Mar 2015

DSC07032_small

by njneer.com:

I used to get the feeling that it wasn’t obvious enough that I really enjoy working with embedded systems. I decided to change that by designing a binary timepiece that is portable, easy to use, has long battery life, and has a very barebones “circuits and components” feel to it. After wearing the final product for about a month now, I feel like I was successful on all of those goals:

The Binary Wristwatch – [Link]


25 Feb 2015

1_Sec_to_100_Seconds_Timer_PIC

This project is a timer project and build around popular 555 Timer IC, It can be used for all application required a delay of up to 100 Seconds. Onboard board preset to adjust the required timer duration in range of of 1 to 100 Seconds, Tact switch SW1 to reset the timer and SW2 to start the timer. LED D3 works as power indicator and LED D2 to indicate timer operation.

Load can be connected to CN1 Screw Terminal, Out-put has both the operation normally Open and normally closed. Circuits works on 12V DC and consume approx. 100mA current. Very useful project can be used in various applications like water irrigation system, Kitchen timer etc.

Supply input 12 VDC @ 100 mA
Onboard start and reset tactile switch
Relay output: SPDT relay
Relay specification: 5 A @ 250 VAC
Relay state LED indicator
Preset adjustable range function
Power-On LED indicator
Screw terminal connector for easy relay output connection
Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
PCB dimensions 48 mm x 63 mm

1 to 100 Seconds Timer – [Link]

10 Feb 2015

The PCA8565 plays a very important role in the real time systems like digital clock, attendance system and tariff switching. In applications where timestamp is needed, PCA8565 real time clock is a good option. It provides the following benefits: low power consumption, allows the main system for time-critical tasks, and more accurate than other methods.

The PCA8565 is a CMOS real time clock and calendar optimized for low power consumption. A programmable clock output, interrupt output and voltage-low detector are also provided. All address and data are transferred serially via a two-line bidirectional I2C-bus with a maximum bus speed of 400kbps. The built-in word address register is incremented automatically after each written or read data byte. It provides a year, month, day, weekday, hours, minutes and seconds based on a 32.768kHz quartz crystal. It features alarm and timer functions, low current, and extended operating temperature range of -40 degrees Celsius to +125 degrees Celsius. It further contains an 8-bit year register that can hold values from 00 to 99 in BCD format, which also compensates for leap years, thus leap year is automatically corrected.

From the application circuit, the PCA8565 can be used to perform standard RTC functions, such as tracking the actual time and date, or acting as a reference timer. To support power management, the PCA8565 can be used to wake the microcontroller from hibernation mode. In systems that use a PLL, it can serve as a system reference clock for the PLL input. The PCA8565 can also be used as a watchdog timer, or as an activation timer to start measurements or initiate other functions.

PCA8565 Application Circuit – [Link]

21 Jan 2015

oscillatorfig2

by Ashish Kumar and Pushek Madaan @ edn.com:

In our modern era, digital logic has become the core of all the electronics circuits either in the form of an FPGA, microcontroller, microprocessor, or discreet logic. Digital systems use many components that must be interconnected to perform the required functions. The vital element for proper operation of such a digital system is a CLOCK signal that enables all these digital components to communicate and establish synchronization between them. Hence, we always need a source to generate this clock signal.

This source comes in the form of an oscillator. Although most of today’s microcontrollers have an integrated RC oscillator, the clock generated by such an internal RC oscillator is typically not good enough to support the precision required for communication with other modules in the system. Thus, an external oscillator is required that can provide a clock signal to the complete system and yet meet all the requirements for precision, signal integrity and stability.

Oscillators: How to generate a precise clock source – [Link]

16 Dec 2014

Timer_photo_(1)_th

This is a quick project for a timer. Recently I finished my UV light exposure box and thought that it will be convenient to have a build in timer to switch off the light after preset time. So I had a PIC16F628A lying around and after searching the web I found a Brazilian site (I think?) with tons of interesting projects with microcontrolers. This project is based on one of them.

The schematic uses the internal oscillator of the microcontroller which is enough accurate for my purposes, but as the pins 15 and 16 are left unoccupied, there can be connected external quartz resonator with better accuracy. As I said, this project is based on an existing project, but actually my schematic is quite different and the code was almost completely rewritten. My programming abilities are little rusty, but I think the final result is quite good.

Simple timer with PIC16F628A – [Link]

15 Nov 2014

IMG_5610

by Jeremy Cook @ makezine.com:

Most of us have probably seen clocks or numerical displays that flip sequential boards to display the next number in a sequence. If you wanted to take that a step further, you could make a replica of “Dottie,” which flips small dots as pixels. As the great video below says, it makes a “pleasant mechanical flipping sound all day.” It also tells the date, chimes every 15 minutes, and gives an animation show once an hour.

Dottie the Flip Dot Clock – [Link]

27 Oct 2014

15544764266_8e4625878c_z

by johngineer.com:

The ChronodeVFD is a personal project I’ve been working on for a couple of months. It’s a wristwatch built around the IVL2-7/5 VFD display tube. I originally purchased a few of these tubes to build a standard desk clock, but after playing around with them, I realized I could probably build a wristwatch too. The tube has a number of features which make it more suited than most Soviet-surplus VFDs for this purpose.

ChronodeVFD: Wearable Electronics VFD Wristwatch – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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