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9 Jul 2012

A DCF77 time signal receiver with USB connection. Emulates a serial interface (COMx) using CDC and works with Windows 2000 to 7, 32 or 64 bit, and with Linux. Should also work with Windows 98, Me, and MacOS.

FunkUsb: Radio controlled clock receiver with USB - [Link]

9 Jul 2012

Jürgen Beisert writes:

I like the handy DCF77 signal. In this project no clock should use it, instead the computers in my home network should be served by a precise time reference. Due to the fact most other interfaces are no longer available on modern computers, it uses the USB to forward the prepared DCF77 signal to the host.

DCF77 to USB converter - [Link]

13 Jun 2012

[via]

Bill shows the world’s smallest atomic clock and then describes how the first one made in the 1950s worked. He describes in detail the use of cesium vapor to create a feedback or control loop to control a quartz oscillator. He highlights the importance of atomic team by describing briefly how a GPS receiver uses four satellites to find its position. You can learn more about atomic clocks and the GPS system in the EngineerGuy team’s new book Eight Amazing Engineering Stories http://www.engineerguy.com/elements

How an atomic clock works, and its use in the global positioning system (GPS) - [Link]

11 Jun 2012

www.changpuak.ch writes:

Well, our meetings take place on wednesdays at 10:30 (sharp). A radio controlled clock is used to determine whether you are late (and must bring a cake next time) or not. Unfortunately the identical radio controlled clock in my office always shows a different time :-(

After baking a lot of cakes, I thought about synchronising these disreputable clocks …

Homebrew DCF-77 Signal Generator - [Link]


9 Jun 2012

www.akafugu.jp writes:

Simpleclock is an easy to assemble attractive 4-digit 7-segment LED display clock with temperature and alarm function. It is available in three display colors: Red, Blue and White.

It comes as a kit of through-the-hole parts and can be soldered by any person with basic soldering experience. An attractive acrylic stand is included.

Simpleclock: An LCD clock kit suitable for beginners with open source Arduino firmware - [Link]

9 Jun 2012

www.akafugu.jp writes:

The DS3231M breakout board is a compact breakout board for the new DS3231M high precision real time clock chip. With it, you can add timekeeping and alarm functionality to any Arduino (or other microcontroller that supports the I2C/TWI protocol).

The board comes with an onboard CR1220 backup battery (keeps time when main power is disconnected). All pins on the chip are broken out, allowing you to use extra features such as 1Hz and 32kHz square wave output, interrupt on alarm and reset.

DS3231M Real Time Clock Breakout - [Link]

8 May 2012

Haris Andrianakis writes:

This is a project i designed a year ago but never built, because of not enough spare time. This month i found some free time so i started building it and i send the pcb layout for manufacturing.

All started when i received some IV-11 vfd tubes from an ebay seller i ordered from and i started testing and prototyping by first trying to simple light up the VFD tube.

A VFD tube works like a 7-segment led display with some small differences.

A) The Filaments. The Filaments exists to power the tube. We have to supply these two pins with 1.2Volt and nothing more (polarity doesn’t matter).

B) The Grid. The Grid is like the common anode of a 7-Segment LED display. So the Grid has to be pushed high at 60Volt (in these tubes) in order the segments to be able to light up.

C) The Segments. The Segments light’s up simple by pushing them high at 60Volt.

IV-11 VFD Tube Clock Final Design - [Link]

2 May 2012

The Binary Burst clock shows the time with LEDs:

The clock uses 3 LEDs on each spire to count up to 5 in binary. The hours are displayed by the middle LED in RED (Its a Red/Blue bicolor, the others are just blue). Video, and links to the board and code repository are included in the post. Check out a demonstration video below. There’s also a time-lapse soldering video of build. [via]

Binary Burst clock ticks away the time with LEDs - [Link]

30 Apr 2012

kentar.net63.net writes:

This device is a countdown timer specially designed for PCB exposure box.You can set how many minutes will be on UV light device , store this time in PIC’s EEPROM . Pressing start button lights are on until preset time ends. When lights are off an audible signal is heard. Microcontroller used is Microchip’s PIC 16F877. I used Mikroelektronika Mikropascal compiler to program the chip. Delay time 1-255 minutes.

Count down timer for UV PCB exposure boxes - [Link]

30 Apr 2012

tehnikservice.net writes:

This is a good looking and practical device that can be useful in many areas where countdown timer is needed. This project is based on the PIC16F84A microcontroller. The time range can be adjusted between 1 and 999 seconds.   This project  has 3 buttons and one of them is named Set Button. In order to regulate the seconds up or down  on the display you should press the Set button while pressing the button on the  left or the right  hand side. The author of this project is @Pedja089. More photos on Facebook Fan Page.

Timer from 1 to 999s with PIC16F84A - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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