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29 Apr 2015

IMG_20150116_154725

by mygeekblog.net:

As any beginner electronics hobbyist I have recently came to conclusion that using Arduino (or even Mega328) for small projects is neither cost-effective or educational (I’ll explain why later).

Another reason for writing this article is that I came across few ATTiny13A-SSU chips @ less than $0.90 each, which is even lower the official retail price, so I just had to buy 5 of them, although I didn’t know at the time whattahellamigointodowithit what is it really capable of.

Starting with ATTiny13 – [Link]

29 Apr 2015

F2RR8C3I7SVQAYU.MEDIUM

by silentbogo @ instructables.com:

If you previously worked(or currently working) with small 8-bit microcontrollers, like ATTiny or PIC12, you’ve probably encountered a fundamental problem of not having enough GPIO pins for your needs or project requirements.

Upgrading to a larger MCU is only one of the options, but as usual there is an alternative. In this article I will explain how to use shift registers in some common situations in order to expand the I/O capacity of your microcontroller. As an example I will use an ATTiny13A and a 74HC595 shift register.

Getting more I/O pins on ATTiny with Shift Registers – [Link]

24 Apr 2015

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The IoT development platform that runs Python in real time, and features the perfect blend of power, friendliness and flexibility.

A small, super low power, inexpensive, and 100% Python programmable IoT development board. The WiPy takes the wireless freedom of WiFi and combines it with the power, flexibility, and ease of use of Python. We designed the WiPy from the ground up, with one goal in mind: “Let’s make IoT development fun both for beginners and professionals”.

  • Inexpensive, small and breadboard friendly.
  • Ultra low power (850uA with the WiFi connection active)
  • 100% PYTHON PROGRAMMABLE.
  • Lots of GPIOs, interfaces and peripherals.
  • Powerful CPU and state of the art WiFi radio.

The WiPy: The Internet of Things Taken to the Next Level – [Link]

22 Apr 2015

PIC_18F_28_PIN_PIC_Development_Board_PIC

This is a versatile, configurable, and cost effective Development Board designed for the 18F – 28 pin series of Microcontroller from Microchip. The board is simplest form with all the Port pins terminating in a header connector for easy connection to the outside world.

PIC 18F – 28 PIN PIC Development Board – [Link]


22 Apr 2015

domino

Domino.IO is an affordable and advanced WiFi hardware platform for Things, and full life-cycle services for Makers!

Are you a maker? Have you got a nice idea but could not verify it with a limited budget? Do you have a headache to design Wi-Fi products but cannot find a good support? Have you built a nice prototype ready for manufacturing but could not find the resources for mass production? This is why we launch the Domino.IO project – with everything you need to build Wi-Fi products and full life-cycle services to support your projects.

Domino.IO is a low-cost, high-performance 802.11 bgn WiFi hardware platform, with a modular design architecture, unlimited extension capabilities and Arduino compatibility. It is suitable for mass production, enhanced with full life-cycle services for makers.

Domino IO – An Open Hardware WiFi Platform for Things – [Link]

15 Apr 2015

Tosh6689A_HRES

by elektor.com:

Toshiba has added a new variant to its TX04 range of microcontrollers. The TMPM46BF10FG is targeted at IoT applications and incorporates dedicated hardware to implement a true random number generator (TRNG: SP800-90C standard) through the combination of a random entropy seed generation (ESG) circuit and Hash-DRGB created by the secure hash processor (SHA) and software program. These features offload computational overheads on the main processor and meet the standards of security required for network communications.

Based around an ARM Cortex-M4F core, with a maximum operating frequency of 120 MHz, the TMPM46BF10FG incorporates 1024 Kbyte of flash memory and 514 Kbyte SRAM required for secure communications control, four types of security circuits for network communications. The MCU also integrates an SLC NAND flash memory controller and 4- and 8-bit error correction circuitry (BCH ECC) that supports memory expansion with 1Gbit to 4Gbit SLC NAND flash memory chips.

Toshiba TX04 for the IoT – [Link]

14 Apr 2015

ESP8266-development-board-power-on

ESP8266 is an 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi module which became very popular recently because of its capabilities and ease of use and integration. Many electronics hobbyists are building projects on ESP8266 and they generally need to connect the module to their PC or a microcontroller. Some interfacing problems arise at this point.

In this project, we are building an ESP8266 Development Board which lets the user make connection to ESP8266 from a PIC microcontroller and their PC. The board also provides all the needs to be used as microcontroller peripherals such as LCD display, pusbuttons, indicator LEDs and GPIO extension. The PC connection is done by the help of FT232RL USB-UART converter over a Mini-USB connector. Since the PIC microcontroller used is a 5V chip, 5V-3.3V bi-directional level converter circuits are also included on the board.

DIY ESP8266 Development Board – [Link]

14 Apr 2015

IMG_20140820_092830

by programmablehardware.blogspot.ie:

This chimera is a microcontroller emulation of a UK101, an 8-bit microcomputer from the early 1980s. Needless to say I had one; it is a shocking thirty-three years since, as a spotty teenager, I soldered one together over the course of a few days. I recall the kit cost the equally shocking sum of £99.95 (a lot of pocket-money), and had to be smuggled through Irish customs in my parents’ car because the Single European Market was at that time merely a twinkle in M. Delors’ eye. In its original configuration it had 1k of user RAM, 1k of display RAM, 8k ROM Basic (from Microsoft) and a 2k ROM monitor. When it went to its present resting place in the attic a couple of years later, it had 16k of user RAM, 2k of display RAM and an additional 6k of utility ROM, all piggy-backed on the original chips.

8080 on a Stellaris Launchpad – [Link]

14 Apr 2015

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Razvan Dubau over at Extragsm posted a how-to on using an ESP8266 module as a wireless switcher:

A custom firmware to transform the ESP8266 wifi module into a wifi http based switcher GPIO02 is used as an output pin. You can connect a led or a relay and control it by a button added to GPIO00. Also the firmware provides a web interface and a simple API that will controll the GPIO02 state.

Use ESP8266 module as a wireless switcher – [Link]

14 Apr 2015

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Peter Scargill writes:

If you’ve read my early blogs you’ll know I do a lot of work with a pal of mine, Aidan Ruff. We had an R&D company for years and one of our products was a home control system which was plastered all over the UK tech press at the time and loads of people loved it but it involved spouse-unfriendly WIRES – bad mistake. Well, this DOESN’T.

The two of us have been working on home control for several years and regular readers will know that in the past few months, the ESP8266 boards have turned everything around. I’ve scrapped various radio designs and gone “hell for leather” into using these boards, this original plan was with an Arduino Mega as a “master controller”. That too went out of the window when the Raspberry Pi 2 came out, dirt cheap but with more than enough power to control a house. Armed with a WIFI USB dongle, the basics of a completely wireless home control setup are now in place. Personally it could not be better timed as we’re moving house shortly and so this is an ideal opportunity to do the job properly before inflicting this on other people.

Home Control 2015 – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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