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23 Jan 2012

Giorgos Lazaridis writes:

An AC Hum touch sensor is a very special technique, rarely used for switching applications, because it has a great disadvantage. In order to operate normally, an active AC power line has to be near by. More info about this type of touch sensor, along with other types (including the capacitance method), can be found in the corresponding theory page, how the touch buttons work..

DIY AC Hum Touch Button - [Link]

23 Jan 2012

Giorgos Lazaridis writes:

Soldering stations comes in a variety of prices and capabilities. The cheaper stations have a power controller, to control the power delivered to the soldering iron. More expensive stations will have a temperature controller near the tip of the soldering iron, and control the temperature using this feedback.

The quality of soldering with a station is much higher than with a simple soldering iron. Especially if the station has a temperature controller on the tip. That is because, the solder has a very specific working temperature. For example, the one i use (60% tin 40% lead), is liquefied at 190C. Of course, you do not solder at 190C! The soldering iron i use, exceeds by far this temperature. I measured it up to 410C! This has negative effect on the soldering quality.

Homemade Soldering Station - [Link]

22 Jan 2012

ospid.com writes:

We’ve been working hard over the last several months to build a fully-featured, open source PID controller that’s every bit as capable as its closed brethren.

There’s a bunch of information on this site regarding technical details, purchasing information, and even a quick PID primer.  Take a look around, and let us know what you think!

(If you’re so inclined, there’s also a post on my personal blog with some introductory videos)

osPID – Open Source PID Controller - [Link]

 

12 Jan 2012

Ishan Karve writes:

I work in an office where working late in the night is the norm including weekends.. This post is not about my office or about the work we do late into the night but about a problem statement posed to me by my subordinates. It goes like this..

The office or rather the building rules demand that we shut down (hard off) all electrical equipment once the office is finally shut for the day. This means that our office servers also requires to be shut down along with the UPS (APC SMART 2200). Now this has nothing to do with our office trying to be green but more to do about obviating any fire risks.

So, whats the problem. The problem is that, once we (management) leave the office, the duty staff has to shut down all the equipment including the servers. The issue is that our two servers running WindoZe 2008 R2 and WindoZe 2003 take about 15 minutes to shut down cleanly. And the UPS then needs to be shutdown afterwards. 15 minutes may seem a small time interval for an office which works routinely for 15+ hours in a day in a single shifts 7 days a week. But at night 2330 when its time to go home every minute looks like an hour to the subordinate staff. So the problem was narrated to me over a short tea break. Since I believe in working Smarter and not Harder, I decided to save 15 man minutes every day.

APC UPS Shutdown Manager - [Link]


23 Nov 2011

alternet.us.com writes:

For use with my home theater PC I developed an IR Transceiver by combining 2 projects (Receiver, Blaster). Note that this device may be taxing of your serial port, I take no responsibility for any damage you cause to your equipment. That said, I’ve provided PDF’s of the silkscreen, copper layout, and the Eagle PCB files.

IR Remote Control Transceiver- [Link]

7 Nov 2011

www.iwasz.pl writes:

So I came up with an idea of Cannon DSLR remote control. They are relatively cheap to buy on ebay, or other local online auction sites like allegro.pl here in Poland. But I wanted to build something by my self. As a complete amateur I wanted to make something small, and simple, thus DIY IR remote control for my camera was born. The protocol was reverse engineered by some smart people over the internet, so all I needed to do was to design the PCB, solder the stuff together, write a program and flash it.

Canon IR Remote - [Link]

6 Nov 2011

Camera-B-On TV-B-Gone – [via]

I have created a Camera-B-On TV-B-Gone. This fairly simple mod allows me to use my TV-B-Gone as a camera remote for my Nikon D90. In fact, this will work as a shutter remote for a lot of Nikon cameras.

If you have a USBTinyISP you can easily make a Camera-B-On by upgrading your TV-B-Gone.

Camera-B-On TV-B-Gone - [Link]

2 Nov 2011

Marc writes – [via]

Just stumbled on this application note from National Semiconductor. It’s a nice summary of standard opamp circuits with formula’s. I thought it would be a nice item for the blog.

Almost all opamp circuits you will ever need - [Link]

16 Sep 2011

Stian wrote up a great post on his own blog explaining how his project works and how you can build your own control hardware. He writes: [via]

A professional sous vide setup costs at least >$1000, so it’s a bit out of reach for the normal home cook – except for the DIYers.. It’s not that hard to build yourself if you put your mind to it. What you need is the following components: Water bath with a electric heater.

  1. Some method of circulating the water.
  2. A way of accurately regulate the heater based on water temperature
  3. Some way of plastic bag packing you meat.

Water bath with heater is easy enough, there are tons of items out there that does this – slow cookers and rice cookers for example. I use a simple rice cooker, the cheaper/simpler the better (we’re going to cycle it’s power on/off, a dumb cooker will behave better facing a power loss). To circulate the water I use a simple ebay aquarium pump (payed $9.90 for mine). To pack the meat in airtight bags you can either buy a cheap vacuum-packer or simply use zip-lock bags (fill your sink with water, add meat to bag, submerge bag in water but keep the opening above waterlevel – pressure from the water will press out all the air, seal the bag..)

SousVide-O-Mator Schematic and Discussion - [Link]

7 Sep 2011

Custom Controller V2. Patrick writes – [via]

Hello adafruit industries. My name is Patrick McCabe and I am a 17 year old senior in high school. I was on the second ”show and tell” of yours. I showed off my custom controller I made. I made it so I can provide input to my robots and get information returned. It contains a LCD, Xbee transceiver, custom LCD Arduino micro-controller backpack, 3 button inputs, a potentiometer, and a Wii Nunchuck circuit board with joystick. The buttons will allow navigation through the menu system and sending simple commands within the menu. The Wii Nunchuck will allow for manual control of a robot by using either the joystick or through tilting action read by the accelerometer. The potentiometer will allow variables like speed to be adjusted on a robot.

Custom Controller V2 - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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