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23 Nov 2011

alternet.us.com writes:

For use with my home theater PC I developed an IR Transceiver by combining 2 projects (Receiver, Blaster). Note that this device may be taxing of your serial port, I take no responsibility for any damage you cause to your equipment. That said, I’ve provided PDF’s of the silkscreen, copper layout, and the Eagle PCB files.

IR Remote Control Transceiver- [Link]

7 Nov 2011

www.iwasz.pl writes:

So I came up with an idea of Cannon DSLR remote control. They are relatively cheap to buy on ebay, or other local online auction sites like allegro.pl here in Poland. But I wanted to build something by my self. As a complete amateur I wanted to make something small, and simple, thus DIY IR remote control for my camera was born. The protocol was reverse engineered by some smart people over the internet, so all I needed to do was to design the PCB, solder the stuff together, write a program and flash it.

Canon IR Remote - [Link]

6 Nov 2011

Camera-B-On TV-B-Gone – [via]

I have created a Camera-B-On TV-B-Gone. This fairly simple mod allows me to use my TV-B-Gone as a camera remote for my Nikon D90. In fact, this will work as a shutter remote for a lot of Nikon cameras.

If you have a USBTinyISP you can easily make a Camera-B-On by upgrading your TV-B-Gone.

Camera-B-On TV-B-Gone - [Link]

2 Nov 2011

Marc writes – [via]

Just stumbled on this application note from National Semiconductor. It’s a nice summary of standard opamp circuits with formula’s. I thought it would be a nice item for the blog.

Almost all opamp circuits you will ever need - [Link]


16 Sep 2011

Stian wrote up a great post on his own blog explaining how his project works and how you can build your own control hardware. He writes: [via]

A professional sous vide setup costs at least >$1000, so it’s a bit out of reach for the normal home cook – except for the DIYers.. It’s not that hard to build yourself if you put your mind to it. What you need is the following components: Water bath with a electric heater.

  1. Some method of circulating the water.
  2. A way of accurately regulate the heater based on water temperature
  3. Some way of plastic bag packing you meat.

Water bath with heater is easy enough, there are tons of items out there that does this – slow cookers and rice cookers for example. I use a simple rice cooker, the cheaper/simpler the better (we’re going to cycle it’s power on/off, a dumb cooker will behave better facing a power loss). To circulate the water I use a simple ebay aquarium pump (payed $9.90 for mine). To pack the meat in airtight bags you can either buy a cheap vacuum-packer or simply use zip-lock bags (fill your sink with water, add meat to bag, submerge bag in water but keep the opening above waterlevel – pressure from the water will press out all the air, seal the bag..)

SousVide-O-Mator Schematic and Discussion - [Link]

7 Sep 2011

Custom Controller V2. Patrick writes – [via]

Hello adafruit industries. My name is Patrick McCabe and I am a 17 year old senior in high school. I was on the second ”show and tell” of yours. I showed off my custom controller I made. I made it so I can provide input to my robots and get information returned. It contains a LCD, Xbee transceiver, custom LCD Arduino micro-controller backpack, 3 button inputs, a potentiometer, and a Wii Nunchuck circuit board with joystick. The buttons will allow navigation through the menu system and sending simple commands within the menu. The Wii Nunchuck will allow for manual control of a robot by using either the joystick or through tilting action read by the accelerometer. The potentiometer will allow variables like speed to be adjusted on a robot.

Custom Controller V2 - [Link]

7 Sep 2011

Rob writes in… [via]

I’ve seen quite a few hacks related to controlling appliances, lights, etc over the years and just wanted to share a little info so that everyone has access to a cheap way to do it relatively safely. By trade I work in the building controls/integration industry and as a result I use these relays at work and at home(chicken coop control,light,etc)quite a bit.

The interface between your microcontroller of choice and the relay is a simple 555 relay driver circuit. I have included the pdf that inspired me to do it this way. The relay I use is the RIBTU1C. The reason I prefer this relay is that the coil will run on 9VC @ 20mA and the contacts will switch 10A @ 120VAC. Total cost for the RIB and a 555 is under $15 if you shop around. In addition the RIB has a partition inside the box between the line and control sides. There’s also room for a Radio Shack breadboard in there!

Safety First! Switching 120vac loads with a microcontroller - [Link]

5 Sep 2011

pcbheaven.com writes:

I plan to make a pre-heater for my SMD works, and i will need a controller for the air heater. From my job i know the PID controllers and how efficient they are, but i did not really know how they work. After some research i did, i sound the “secrets” of the PID systems (and i also wrote a theory for PID systems). So, now i feel ready to turn theory into product. Many will say again that i could spent $40 to get a PID controller… Yes, i know… But i DON’T want to. For me, making projects is not a chore, it is my hobby, i do it for fun.

K-Type Thermocouple PID Controller - [Link]

3 Sep 2011

Yuan writes in – [via]

Seems like sous-vide is a hot topic on your blog recently, I thought I’d throw my project into the mix: eltierfridge.wordpress.com

This is a Forebrain-controlled mini-fridge turned sous-vide cooker project. I didn’t put any buttons into the project, so everything is controlled over USB (target temperature, PID tuning, LCD backlight). Because Forebrain has built-in USB-HID functionality, no drivers are needed! The control app is written in Qt.

If there’s significant interest in the project, I’ll make an instructable and release the sources on Github!

peltierfridge – Mini-fridge to Sous-vide conversion - [Link]

3 Sep 2011

SousVide-o-Mator from Stian Eikeland on Vimeo.

Stian made this awesome sous-vide temp. controller, which he calls the “SousVide-O-Mator”. Built around an ATMega328 with the Arduino bootloader, it uses a DS18B20 temp. probe to monitor the temp, a 20×4 LCD to communicate with the user, and a solid-state relay to switch the rice cooker on and off. It also features one of the neatest, cleanest stripboard layouts I’ve ever seen (style counts!). He writes:

My brand spanking new homemade Sous Vide controller (PID controller for cooking). By connecting the relay to my rice cooker and putting the probe and a small aquarium pump inside I’m able to very accurately control the water temperature..

This is basically a heating immersion circulator as used by some fancy restaurants – readily made equipment cost in the range of $1000.. So I made one myself on the cheap (controller + rice cooker + water pump). This can be used to cook meat to perfection

Perfect for Sous Vide cooking! ( For more information about Sous Vide: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sous-vide )

Source code is available at bitbucket. Nice work, Stian! [via]

SousVide-O-Mator - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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