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30 May 2014

can-usb

by obddiag.net:

This project started out from a need build a simple device for monitoring the CAN bus. I chose the NUC140LC1CN 32K Cortex-M0 microprocessor from Nuvoton for major reason – it has both USB and CAN peripherals.

  • Simple design
  • Compatible with the LAWICEL CANUSB protocol
  • Exposing itself as USB FTDI device
  • Supporting CAN 2.0A 11-bit and CAN 2.0B 29-bit frames
  • Has internal FIFO CAN message buffer
  • Self powered from USB port
  • Flash-resident USB mass-storage device (MSD) bootloader for firmware updates
  • Firmware is available for download

CAN-USB Interface - [Link]

9 May 2014

legion

Organic LED, microprocessor controlled, intelligent energy source for all of your electronic devices.

Legion is a portable energy source with a built-in Organic LED display coupled with a microprocessor. It can charge any USB powered electronic devices. Unlike a traditional portable battery where you’re left in the dark about the state of charge of your battery, Legion learns how you use your electronic devices and displays precisely how much more time (day:hours:minutes) you have remaining until you run out of power. Legion uses premium grade Lithium Polymer batteries designed to maximize your energy density while packing it into the smallest area possible. Legion is proudly designed in Silicon Valley, California.

[via]

LeGion Halves Phone Charge Times - [Link]

9 May 2014

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Scasagrande shared his USB isolator project, that is available at Github:

I received inspiration for the project from other USB isolator projects on the internet. Mine features a few improvements to many of them:
USB-B and micro-USB connectors on the host (upstream) side
In addition to accepting power via the barrel connector (which goes through a basic 7805 low dropout linear regulator), there is also a micro-USB port for device-side power. This allows you to use the now common cell phone charger cube to power your isolated device
Push-button switch for easy USB disconnection events
Bypass jumper for linear regulator, allowing for 5V power from the barrel connector
Encased in a small box to protect the IC from the world

[via]

USB isolator project - [Link]

8 May 2014

1-wire_board

by Kalle Hyvönen:

I’ve been thinking about making a temperature logger for my room and my computer, I set on using DS18S20 sensors from Maxim because they’re common, cheap and overally pretty ideal. My computer is so new that it does not have a serial port (not 100% sure, I think there might be a pinheader on the motherboard with serial port connections) so I have to use USB for interfacing. Next thing I had to do was to make an USB to 1-wire adapter so I could attach the sensors to my computer.

I browsed around for a while and set on using the DS2490 USB-to-1-wire adapter chip because the circuit for it looked pretty simple. I modded the component values a bit from the ones on the original schematic from Maxim to ones I had in hand. I used 0805 sized SMD components because I have those in store.

USB-to-1-wire Adapter - [Link]


22 Apr 2014
Implementing full-speed USB on NXP LPC microcontrollers

Implementing full-speed USB on NXP LPC microcontrollers

Are you encountering any issues with developing a full-speed USB application on NXP’s LPC microcontrollers? This application note from NXP highlights some of the important issues that you need to be aware of for a typical full-speed USB application. [via]

Implementing full-speed USB on NXP’s LPC microcontrollers - [Link]

4 Apr 2014

charger

cpldcpu did a teardown of an external USB battery:

The device has a USB micro-b socket which is used as 5V input for charging, and a normal USB-A socket as 5V output. The output power can be turned off and on by a toggle button. There are LEDs to indicate active power out (blue) and charging (red) states. The pictures above show the innards of the device. Most space is taken up by an ICR18650 LiIon battery, which are relatively common devices with 2600mAH. In addition, there is a tiny tiny PCB. The rear side of the PCB is dominated by a 4.7µH inductor, which is part of the boost converter to convert the 3.7V of the battery to the 5V USB output.

[via]

Tear down of a cheap external USB battery - [Link]

26 Mar 2014

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A purely software based USB peripheral for ARM Cortex M0+ devices. This software enables Cortex M0+ devices to act as Low speed USB device. It includes a lightweight USB & HID Stack and easily be optimized to consume only 4KB of flash.

LemcUSB: software USB for EFM32ZG (ARM Cortex M0+) - [Link]

25 Mar 2014

2014-03-15-06-33-43-300x295

TomKeddie shared his USB Isolator in dangerousprototypes’s project log forum:

This is a nice simple soldering project that does exactly that, isolates your USB port from connected devices. There are two input usb connectors, one carries data and power from the computer the other supplies power to the output. The output comes from a 3rd USB A connector. There is no power/ground/data connection between the computer and connected devices other than through the isolator chip. This board has two grounds, two power supplies etc.

[via]

Simple USB Isolator - [Link]

15 Mar 2014

20140312_205005-600x337

Frank Zhao shared his simple 6x USB charger with current monitor in the dangerousprototypes.com project log forum:

This is a simple 6 port USB device charger with a individual current monitor on each port. The charging current is indicated using RGB LEDs. Blue means slow charge (under 250mA), green means 250mA to 750mA, red means over 750mA, and purple means over 1500mA (for tablets). This circuit involves an ATmega328P (if you do hobby electronics, I bet you have plenty spares of these), INA169 (check out this breakout board), and a OKR-T10-W12.

Simple 6x USB charger with current monitor - [Link]

13 Jan 2014

RocuIEp

scasagrande shared his GPIBUSB Adapter rev3 in the dangerousprototypes’s project log forum:

This past weekend I finally finished up the third major revision of my GPIBUSB adapter board. Major hardware changes include swapping the pull-up resistors for the proper GPIB line drivers, as well as swapping the FT232RL for the newer FT230X. There is a number of software improvements from improved reliability to additional commands.

Open source hardware GPIB USB Adapter - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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