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11 Nov 2014

by edn.com:

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has unveiled the Raspberry Pi A+ – a smaller version of its original Model A – that costs only $20. The Model A+ is significantly smaller than the Model A (65 mm in length versus 86 mm), consumes less power, uses the BCM2835 application processor, and has 256 MB RAM.

$20 Raspberry Pi Model A+ is smaller, uses less power - [Link]

9 Nov 2014

LiFiFrauenhofer

by elektor.com:

Representatives from the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden will be showing off their Li-Fi wireless communication system at the upcoming electronica exhibition held in Munich from November 11 to 14. The system uses infra-red light as the transmission medium and can transfer data at a speed of up to 1 Gigabit per second over a distance of up to 10 meters.

Li-Fi Goes Live at electronica - [Link]

6 Nov 2014

qtc-battery

by Darren Quick @ gizmag.com:

It can be a herculean task to get kids to eat their vegetables, but they’ll happily chow down on things they aren’t supposed to. If one of those things is a button battery, serious injuries can result in the form of burns to the esophagus or tears in the digestive tract. Researchers may not have found a way to stop kids swallowing button batteries, but they have found a way to make such culinary no-nos safer.

Coating makes swallowing batteries safer for curious kids - [Link]

5 Nov 2014

rcj_wireless_world-record_40Gbps.jpg-(1)

LTE beat by 40X by a new protocol described this week at the Compound Semiconductor Integrated Circuits Symposium in San Diego. Next their aim is wireless 100 Gbit WLAN: R. Colin Johnson @NextGenLog

World’s Wireless Record Breaks 40 Gbit/s - [Link]


31 Oct 2014

darpa-record

by David Szondy @ gizmag.com:

Getting into the Guinness Book of World Records isn’t just about who can eat the most hotdogs or fly a paper airplane the highest. Sometimes it involves technological breakthroughs with huge potential. Guinness has handed DARPA’s Terahertz Electronics program the award for the fastest solid-state amplifier integrated circuit. Developed by Northrop Grumman, the Terahertz Monolithic Integrated Circuit (TMIC) is a ten-stage common-source amplifier that cranks speeds of one terahertz (10^12 Hz), or one trillion cycles per second.

DARPA circuit smashes electronic speed record - [Link]

29 Oct 2014

nanocryotron_fig

Paul Buckley @ edn.com:

MIT researchers have developed a circuit design that could make simple superconducting devices with zero electrical resistance much cheaper to manufacture, and which would be 50 to 100 times as energy efficient as today’s chips. Even though the circuits’ speed probably would not top that of today’s chips, they could solve the problem of reading out the results of calculations performed with Josephson junctions.

Simpler superconducting promised by nanowire device - [Link]

25 Oct 2014

by iFixit Video @ youtube.com:

Its been two years since the last full redesign for the iphone, and we couldn’t be more anxious to see the new upgrade up close. So we sent our Teardown team all the way to Melbourne, Australia to get the first look inside the new iPhone 6.

The iPhone 6 Teardown Review - [Link]

24 Oct 2014

sweatsamplingskinpatch

by Ben Coxworth @ gizmag.com:

Nobody likes having blood samples drawn. What’s more, such samples typically have to be analyzed in a lab before they’re able to tell us anything. But now scientists at the University of Cincinnati and the US Air Force Research Laboratory are developing a system in which a Band-Aid-like skin patch is able to gather and transmit medical data in almost real time, by analyzing the patient’s sweat … and you just need a smartphone to read it, no poking or prodding required.

Sweat-analyzing skin patch could replace blood sampling - [Link]

22 Oct 2014

ultra-low-power-light

by Dario Borghino @ gizmag.com:

Researchers at Tohoku University in Japan have developed a new low-cost flat panel light source that could pioneer a new generation of brighter, cheaper and greener lighting devices to rival LEDs. The device uses arrays of highly conductive carbon nanotubes to deliver evenly-distributed illumination with high efficiency and a power consumption as low as 0.1 Watts – about 100 times lower than that of light-emitting diodes.

Cheap, ultra low-power light source runs on just 0.1 Watts - [Link]

21 Oct 2014

regency_transistor_radio

by Suzanne Deffree @ edn.com:

Texas Instruments announced plans for the Regency TR-1, the first transistor radio to be commercially sold, on October 18, 1954.

The move was a major one in tech history that would help propel transistors into mainstream use and also give new definition to portable electronics.

TI was producing germanium transistors at the time, but the market had been slow to respond, comfortable with vacuum tubes.

However, the use of transistors instead of vacuum tubes as the amplifier elements meant that the device was much smaller, required less power to operate, and was more shock-resistant. Transistor use also allowed “instant-on” operation because there were no filaments to heat up.

TI announces 1st transistor radio, October 18, 1954 - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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