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19 Mar 2012

Holst Centre, imec and DELTA announce an innovative body patch that integrates an ultra-low power electrocardiogram (ECG) chip and a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) radio. This unique combination fuses power-efficient electronics and standardized communication, opening new perspectives for long-term monitoring in health, wellness and medical applications. The system integrates components from Holst Centre and imec’s R&D programs. It is designed in collaboration with DELTA and integrated in DELTA’s ePatch platform. 

The ECG patch measures up to 3 lead ECG signals, tissue-contact impedance and includes a 3D-accelerometer for physical activity monitoring. The data are processed and analyzed locally, and relevant events and information are transmitted through Bluetooth Low Energy. The patch is capable of monitoring, processing and communication on a minimal energy budget. When computing and transmitting the heart rate, the entire system consumes a mere 280µA at 2.1V, running continuously for one month on a 200mAh Li-Po battery. When transmitting accelerometer data (at 32Hz) on top of the heart rate, the power consumption remains below 1mA in continuous operation, giving about 1 week of autonomy.

Innovative technology for an ECG patch - [Link]

14 Mar 2012

Sam Byford writes:

NEC has been developing its organic radical battery (ORB) technology for a while, and today it unveiled the latest iteration. The newest ORB is a 0.3mm (0.012 inch) flexible battery that’s designed to fit into integrated circuit (IC) cards, commonly used for public transport payment, credit cards, and suchlike. Standard IC cards are 0.73mm thick, meaning the addition of a battery shouldn’t prove too taxing on your wallet. Furthermore, the battery can be printed directly onto the IC card as part of the manufacturing process, and the surrounding 0.05mm polymer film can incorporate circuit boards with small components like antennas.

0.3mm thin ‘organic radical battery’ can be printed - [Link]

12 Mar 2012

Fast 3D printing with nanoscale precision -[via]

Printing three dimensional objects with very fine details using two-photon lithography can now be achieved orders of magnitude faster than similar devices in a breakthrough by Vienna University of Technology (TU Vienna) researchers.

The 3D printing process uses a liquid resin, which is hardened at precisely the correct spots by a focused laser beam. The focal point of the laser beam is guided through the resin by movable mirrors and leaves behind a hardened line of solid polymer a few hundred nanometers wide.

Fast 3D printing with nanoscale precision - [Link]

2 Mar 2012

Knowles Sound Solutions has launched a specially developed material called N’Bass Virtual Back Volume, designed to improve the acoustic performance of speakers in devices with small form factors. N’Bass stands for ‘enhanced bass’ and it increases the apparent back volume seen by the loudspeaker driver by up to 100%. It can provide better acoustic performance – specifically more bass – or enable smaller loudspeaker box designs while maintaining the same performance. It also facilitates the use of bigger drivers to provide better sound performance in the same total volume. [via]

Miracle Material Doubles Speaker Volume For Better Bass Response - [Link]


24 Feb 2012

MinION – $900 usb-powered DNA sequencer on sale this year – [via]

Oxford Nanopore (ON) has been developing a disruptive nanopore-based technology for sequencing DNA, RNA, proteins, and other long-chain molecules since its birth in 2005. The company has just that within the next 6-9 months it will bring to market a fast, portable, and disposable protein sequencer that will democratize sequencing by eliminating large capital costs associated with equipment required to enter the field.

MinION – $900 usb-powered DNA sequencer - [Link]

24 Feb 2012

Sony’s SmartTags could change phone habits @ Crave – CNET – [via]

Near field communication (NFC) technology enables smartphones to work with mobile payments and public transit systems, but a new accessory from Sony could make the wireless wonder much more personal.

SmartTags are small programmable tokens that give your NFC-equipped Android phone a series of commands to keep you from performing repetitive tasks.

For example, swiping your phone by a SmartTag placed on a nightstand could turn your phone silent, turn off Wi-Fi/Bluetooth, and activate your alarm for the following morning. While the aforementioned tasks are easy to do on your own, perhaps there is a certain charm in an automatic trigger.

“SmartTags” could change phone habits - [Link]

21 Feb 2012

biolitestove.com writes:

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BioLite CampStove – Charge your gadgets in fire - [Link]

12 Feb 2012

Imec and Genalyte have developed and produced a set of disposable silicon photonics biosensor chips for use in diagnostic and molecular detection equipment. The chips combine standard silicon photonic waveguide technology with bio-compatible modifications and were manufactured using standard microelectronic CMOS fabrication technology. The chips have been tested in the field and proven to meet the functional requirements with high yield.

The high integration level of silicon photonics on the chips enables extensive multiplexed biosensing. Each chip can contain up to 128 ring resonator sensors coated with application-specific chemicals to provide very sensitive molecular detection capability. [via]

Disposable Biosensors Feature Molecular Detection - [Link]

9 Feb 2012

David Biello writes:

One drinking-water bottle could provide enough energy for an entire household in the developing world if Dan Nocera has his way. A chemist from M.I.T. and founder of the company Sun Catalytix, Nocera has developed a cobalt-based catalyst that allows him to store energy the same way plants do: by splitting water.

“Almost all the solar energy is stored in water splitting,” Nocera told the inaugural ARPA-E conference on March 2. Solar Catalytix is among five companies awarded government funding to develop “direct solar fuels,” dubbed “electrofuels” by ARPA-E, the new Advanced Research Projects Agency for transformational energy technologies. “We emulated photosynthesis for large-scale storage of solar energy.”

Artificial photosynthesis could power your house - [Link]

8 Feb 2012

Thinfilm Electronics and PARC developed a technology for printing semiconductors onto a plastic film – [via]

Last month, a small Norwegian company called Thinfilm Electronics and PARC, the storied Silicon Valley research lab, jointly showed off a technological first—a plastic film that combined both printed transistors and printed digital memory.

Such flexible electronics could be an important component of future products, such as food packaging that senses and record temperatures, shock-sensing helmets, as well as smart toys. But the story of how PARC’s technology—the printed transistors—wound up paired with memory technology from an obscure Norwegian company also provides a window onto a 10-year struggle by Xerox to transform the way it commercializes R&D ideas.

Logic circuits and computer memory are printed together on a sheet of plastic - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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