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22 May 2014

FXA3HI9HUIWKA3Y.LARGE

singingshark @ instructables.com writes:

Welcome! For our Environmental Capstone class (senior thesis) for St. Olaf College we built a monitor that would effectively monitor how much water a shower uses. For our project we made four different monitors using the same process. This instructable is written as if you were to make a single water monitor. [...]

Shower Monitor Arduino with LCD display - [Link]

22 May 2014

temperature-logger-circuit

praveen @ circuitstoday.com posted a project on a Temperature logger using Arduino:

This project is about a simple USB temperature logging system using arduino uno and the serial monitor function in the arduino IDE. The system monitors the temperature every 2 seconds and shows it on the arduino serial monitor. The temperature is shown in °Celsius and °Fahrenheit. The system is interfaced to the PC through the USB port. LM35 is used as the temperature sensor.

LM35 is three terminal linear temperature sensor from National semiconductors. It can measure temperature from-55c to +150C. The voltage output of the LM35 increases 10mV per degree Celsius rise in temperature. LM35 can be operated from a 5V supply and the stand by current is less than 60uA. The pin out of LM35 is shown in the figure below.

Temperature logger using Arduino - [Link]

16 May 2014

zero

A new development board has been released from the Arduino – Arduino Zero:

A new development board has been released from the Arduino stable of development products. This board has been developed jointly by Atmel and Arduino and targets ‘The next generation of IoT development’.

The Zero board contains an Atmel SAMD21 microcontroller, built around the 32-bit ARM Cortex M0+ processor. The board also packs 256 KB of flash and 32 KB of SRAM. Shield connectors are Arduino R3 compatible at 3.3 V. The (EDBG) Atmel embedded software debugger is available to aid program development.

Acording to Massimo Banzi, co-founder and CEO at Arduino “The Zero board expands the Arduino family by providing increased performance to fuel creativity of the Maker community. The flexible feature set enables endless project opportunities for devices and acts as a great educational tool for learning about 32-bit application development”.

Arduino Zero Targets the IoT - [Link]

16 May 2014

accesscontrol

An Arduino-based RFID access control to open garage door using RFID by Jason Hamilton:

This is my Arduino-based project that allows you to use RFID for access control to open a door. The door can be anything that can be controlled by a relay. In my case it will be a garage door opener.
This is the initial prototype. Next I plan to build it on a prototype shield and then if put it on a PCB. The top section of components (Arduino and breadboard) will be placed inside the garage and the bottom section of components (LED, buzzer, NFC/RFID reader) will be placed outside (in a project box).

[via]

RFID access control for garage door - [Link]


16 May 2014

Exercise-1-prototype

Want to run Arduino code in a PIC MCU?

 Here’s an approach that enables Arduino code to be configured for execution with the Microchip Technology PIC32MX250F128B small-outline 32-bit microcontroller. It uses the Microchip Technology MPLAB X IDE and MPLAB XC32 C Compiler and the Microchip Technology Microstick II programmer/debugger.

[via]

Execute Arduino code in a PIC MCU using MPLAB IDE - [Link]

15 May 2014

DmxKeyPads

Tony Keith build an Arduino DMX tester, he writes:

I work part-time (more of a hobby) in the lighting industry and use DMX since it is the industry standard for communicating or controlling devices (lighting fixtures, controllers, consoles, etc..) I have seen commercial DMX testers on the market but I wanted to create my own.

I have been working on an idea to create a low cost (<$50), Arduino based DMX tester.

The tester would provide the following functionality:
Simple input protocol for entering commands using 4 X 4 (16) key pad matrix.
Support LCD display (4 x 20) Character
Output DMX for single channel or a range of channels at a set intensity level.

Arduino DMX Tester – Inexpensive Tester for Sending DMX-512 - [Link]

15 May 2014

SRF_Shield

The Ciseco SRF shield instantly transforms any Arduino style board into a fully wireless device. There are no jumpers to worry about, no configuration to be done, simply plug in and begin coding. The shield utilises the world’s best value, secure wireless module, the SRF.

You can securely exchange data with all other Ciseco radio devices, including the ultra-long range ARF. Designed for ease of use, the shield uses normal ASCII when transferring data, requiring no library or complex software. This means all your memory space is for code, not to drive the radio. All settings can be accessed or changed via standard text based AT commands.

The shield has extra pads to allow for configurations such as; Over the Air Programming of your micro, low power sleep states and adding an external antenna to extend the range.

The SRF has flexible frequency and power settings, to cater for all global radio regulations; these are easily set in software.

Also available:

Ciseco SRF shield transforms any Arduino into a fully wireless device - [Link]

14 May 2014

HC-SR04-ultrasonic-range-finder

by praveen @ circuitstoday.com:

Ultrasonic range finder using 8051 microcontroller has been already published by me in this website. This time it is an ultrasonic range finder using arduino. HC-SR04 ultrasonic range finder module is used as the sensor here. The display consists of a three digit multiplexed seven segment display. This range finder can measure up to 200 cm and has an accuracy of 1cm. There is an option for displaying the distance in inch also. Typical applications of this range finder are parking sensors, obstacle warning system, level controllers, terrain monitoring devices etc. Lets have a look at the HC-SR04 ultrasonic module first.

Ultrasonic range finder using arduino - [Link]

14 May 2014

Printoo’s flexible modules provide the ideal form factor to quickly create first product concepts for smart wearables devices. BITalino (http://www.bitalino.com/) is revolutionizing DIY health tracking by making physiological sensors to measure the body’s biosignals accessible to all. Combine the two and it has never been easier to create revolutionary smart wearable concepts to life.

With Printoo, a number of inputs were already available: accelerometer, temperature sensor, capacitive and light sensors. BITalino’s modules for Electromyography (EMG), Electrodermal Activity (EDA) and Electrocardiogram (ECG) can be easily connected to Printoo through a flexible coupling board. Combine these inputs with flexible LEDs (in strip or matrix form), electrochromic displays, a sound buzzer, as well as Bluetooth Low Energy connectivity, and the possibilities are endless.

BITalino – Create projects with physiological sensors - [Link]

 

9 May 2014


Worlds first affordable plug & play, secure, long range wireless for Arduino

SRF Shield – Instant wireless networking for Arduino - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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