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12 Jun 2014

The WifiDuino is the chip-sized Arduino + Wi-Fi + 128×64 OLED at low price that is easy to use.

WifiDuino is an open-source Arduino-compatible, wifi-enabled board. It allows users to use Arduino IDE (Integrated Development Environment) interface to write programs directly, and with Wi-Fi function. WifiDuino is user friendly, get started in no time. What’s different from Arduino Wi-Fi shield is that WifiDuino is a lot smaller in size, cheaper and easier to use.

WifiDuino is an open source project, which means you are welcome to develop and improve the project if you want. It is also ideal for beginners too. WifiDuino and Arduino are used the same chip. You can quickly learn how to make things with WifiDuino with its rich library resources from the Arduino database.

WifiDuino – The WifiDuino is the chip-sized Arduino + Wi-Fi + 128×64 OLED - [Link]

11 Jun 2014

PK @ dqydj.net writes:

Let me set this up for you: most 8-bit AVRs in the wild (I happened to use an Arduino Nano for this project) are running at 16 MHz. That’s 16,000,000 calculations per second… a very respectable number for most embedded applications.

The VGA industry standard, which is pretty much the default case “we-can-always-fallback-to-this” video standard (640 pixels wide by 480 pixels tall by 60 frames per second), requires pixels to be clocked out at 25.175 MHz:

25,175,000 > 16,000,000.

And that was just one of the barriers to pulling off this silly project. And, yes, with the hack I told you about last time (Please see my notes below), more is possible without overclocking the Arduino – roughly 800 or so pixels wide in 4 bit color should be doable with a 16MHz part, and, probably 1024 pixels in 4 bit color are in reach for 20 MHz clocked parts. (If you’re willing to drop to 2 or 1 bit color and spend a ton on ICs that can handle even faster clocks, you can hit HD resolutions – but I think you’ll run into financial constraints before you max out on the technical side)

How to Produce 640×480 Color VGA Video From an 8-Bit Arduino - [Link]

10 Jun 2014

motor-speed-control-arduino

praveen @ circuitstoday.com writes:

PWM or pulse width modulation is a very common method used for controlling the power across devices like motor, light etc. In PWM method the power across the load is controlled by varying the duty cycle of the drive signal. More the duty cycle more power is delivered across the load and less the duty cycle, less power is delivered across the load. A hex keypad is used for controlling the speed. The speed can be varied in seven steps using the hex keypad. Arduino UNO is the type os arduino development board used in this circuit. The circuit diagram of the PWM motor speed control using arduino is shown in the figure below.

PWM motor speed control using Arduino - [Link]

10 Jun 2014

Add a video monitor to your arduino via serial !! You can use it as your prefered output or as a secondary screen for the results of your sketch.

All you send through the serial will be printed out on your TV screen. (You can use an old TV).

On Arduino, you must connect TX from arduino to RX (blue borne) of this my rig adapter. Or on a PC, you can connect direct via USB cable.

Add a video monitor to your Arduino using USB Serial TTL to RCA TV input - [Link]

 


9 Jun 2014

blend

Blend Micro is an Arduino development board with built-in Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy (aka BLE or Bluetooth Smart) connectivity targeted at developers using the Arduino platform to design IoT applications. The board uses an Atmel ATmega32u4 micro-controller and the Nordic nRF8001 BLE chip.

The Blend Micro runs in the BLE peripheral role only, allowing BLE central role devices to establish communication.

Blend Bluetooth with an Arduino Platform - [Link]

8 Jun 2014

tetris1

jollifactory @ instructables.com writes:

One of the electronics DIY kit jolliFactory came up with is the Bi-color LED Matrix Driver Module Kit. This module is designed to be chain-able so that you may daisy-chain the modules together to the number of modules you need to suit your project.

Arduino Tetris on bi-color LED matrix - [Link]

8 Jun 2014

14118588217_9c079182ce_z

by lowpowerlab.com:

Hello folks. I’ve been trying to develop a new Moteino variant, one based on the  chip. I dubbed it Moteino MEGA since it has significantly more memory, IO and functionality than the 328P. All went well except when trying out with RFM69 radios, I can only transmit but not receive. So I’m writing this post in hope that someone else tried the RFM69 library with an Atmega1284P and has some tips to spare.

Moteino MEGA prototype - [Link]

7 Jun 2014

xPico_WiFi_Shield

by elektor.com

The xPico WiFi Shield supports simultaneous wireless LAN client connectivity and access point (AP) functionality. This makes it easy to securely connect to an Arduino microcomputer using web-based tools and interactive applications on smartphones or tablets. Its built-in controller ensures that there is no need for a wireless LAN driver on the Arduino microcontroller to configure wireless connectivity.

The xPico Wi-Fi Shield includes connection management software and a web-based configuration interface to manage connectivity complexity on behalf of the application developer. This significantly cuts down the development overheads for engineers, designers, students and hobbyists who need to quickly add smart Wi-Fi solutions to their Arduino designs.

Lantronix Arduino WiFi Shield - [Link]

4 Jun 2014

2014-04-23 14.52.49

Jasper @ jasper.sikken.nl writes:

I designed an electric load. Using an Arduino Nano, the load can be programmed, and the voltage and current are measured. You can set a constant current (CC), a constant power (CP), or a constant resistance (CR) load by simply typing it in to the Arduino Serial Monitor. The circuit is designed for up to 30V, 5A, and 15W. An opamp, a mosfet, and a small sense resistor form the constant current circuit. The current is set using a DAC. Two other opamps measure the power supply voltage and the current. The circuit is powered from the Arduino USB voltage. I reflow soldered the board using the hacked toaster oven at the hackerdojo. Here are pictures of the reflow soldering process

Arduino based programmable load - [Link]

4 Jun 2014

digital-codelock

by praveen @ circuitstoday.com:

Digital code lock or digital combination lock are a type of digital locks where a combination of digits/characters or both are used for unlocking the lock. This article is about a simple digital code lock using arduino. Here the code consists of a combination of digits from 1 to 6. There are separate keys for locking and unlocking the system. The system can be unlocked by pressing the unlock button after entering the correct combination of digits. A hex key pad is used as the input device. Only the first two rows of key (1, 2, 3, A, 4, 5, 6, B) are used in this project. A is used for locking the system and B is used for unlocking the system. Read this article Interfacing hex keypad to arduino for knowing more about hex keypad and its interfacing to the arduino. The circuit diagram of the digital code lock using arduino is shown in the figure below.

Simple digital code lock using arduino - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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