Home Blog  





31 Aug 2012

Chris @ PyroElectro.com writes:

A tachometer is a useful tool for counting the RPM (rotations per minute) of a wheel or basically anything that spins. The easiest way to build a tachometer is using a transmitter and receiver. When the link between them is broken, you know that something is spinning and can execute some code that calculates the current RPM of whatever is spinning to break the transmitter/receiver link.

In this article we will explore how to use an IR transmitter and receiver break-beam pair similar to the PIC Tachometer project I built a few months ago, but because of popular demand, the Arduino system will be used for all the processing and break-beam interruption counting. The end result will be a 16×2 LCD displaying the RPM of some computer fans.

Arduino Tachometer - [Link]

27 Aug 2012

Ishan Karve writes:

I have made a 16×8 led word clock, a rectangular one. Break from square or almost square ones. This one is a complete modular design and can be scaled up or down in size / complexity according to ones need. The whole design and requisite files are in open domain and the project has also some good 3d pcb renders. The main clock controller is arduino-like and is again scalable.

The LED panel is composed of 8 individual panels of 4×4 LEDs. Each group of 4 such panels will be controlled by a MAX7219. Here are the schematics and board layouts of the 4×4 LED board and LED driver … They are on the way to a fab house….In the meantime I shall do 3D render of my project. Schematics & PCB designed using Eagle CAD 6.2.0 Lite Running on Linux Box.

16×8 LED Word Clock - [Link]

19 Aug 2012

A little known feature of Arduinos and many other AVR chips is the ability to measure the internal 1.1 volt reference. This feature can be exploited to improve the accuracy of the Arduino function – analogRead() when using the default analog reference. It can also be used to measure the Vcc supplied to the AVR chip, which provides a means of monitoring battery voltage without using a precious analog pin to do so.

Secret Arduino Voltmeter – Measure Battery Voltage - [Link]

19 Aug 2012

coolarduino.wordpress.com writes:

O’K, after having some fun with stereo version of the VU meter I described in my previous blog-post, now it’s time to do a serious stuff. Studio grade VU meter !!! 24 steps, equally spaced every 3 dB, covering Extra wide Dynamic Range from -63 up to +6 dB. Single (mono) channel this time, no messing around, absolute precision at the stake. Plus, it keeps absolutely Top-Flat linear frequency response from 40 Hz up to 20 kHz(*).

Audio VU meter with extra wide Dynamic Range 69 dB - [Link]

 


6 Aug 2012

Are you considering using Arduino for your next high-tech project? Think of it twice! Check vpapanik.blogspot.gr opinion about using Arduino for advanced projects.

Arduino is a must-have these days.

It’s a great microcontroller-based prototyping platform, coming into many flavors, with tons of open source projects, tutorials, forums etc. for anyone to start playing with embedded hardware. Using a simple IDE and C++ based code, a USB cable and a few passive components, it is possible to blink a LED in seconds or exchanging messages with a PC (well, a Mac too) in a few minutes, without any serious prior knowledge in electronics.

It’s undoubtedly an excellent starter, but how far can you go with an Arduino ? well, pretty far, but up to a point because (as generally in life) there’s always a tradeoff between simplicity and performance. It’s up to the engineer/maker to decide if and when.

Arduino : thank you and goodbye - [Link]

31 Jul 2012

The idea behind this post is to bring together some robot designs and transform them in a new device with new hardware and standard software (arduino of course) and so easier to use.  These robots have three things in common: a mechanical structure, the hardware and the software. While the mechanical part is necessarily different, we wanted to understand if there was a hardware board that could be common, with a unique development system. The choice, quite obviously, has the Arduino board, which with its development environment is perfect to create similar projects.

Robot shield for Arduino - [Link]

24 Jul 2012

Randy Sarafan writes:

Plants liven up any space by adding a sense of airiness and life. That is – of course – when you don’t forget to water them, and they shrivel up and die. I am very bad at remembering to water plants. That is why I built this self-watering plant to do it for me. Using a soil sensor, and an Arduino-controlled water pump, I have created a system that will never forget to do it. Instead of remembering to water my plants when the soil goes dry, I only have to remember to once and a while refill the water reservoir. In this way, I have decreased my obligation to these plants and put it off to a much later date. Perhaps further iterations of this device can be connected to a rain barrel so that I won’t even have to worry about refilling my reservoir, and the entire system can be fully automated.

Self-Watering Plant with Arduino - [Link]

22 Jul 2012

Ian @ dangerousprototypes.com

Codebender is a new web-based development environment for the Arduino. Everything happens online, they even figured out how to upload new sketches from the browser. Before you groan about another locked-up software as service startup hear this: it’s open source! We talked to Codebender about the project.

Codebender web-based Arduino IDE - [Link]

21 Jul 2012

Arduino environment monitor for Nagios @ boxed. Lars writes – [via]

I just did a rapid prototype of an OSH/DIY network sensor for Nagios using all Adafruit components and an Arduino Ethernet. Thought you might be interested!

Arduino environment monitor for Nagios - [Link]

16 Jul 2012

Does this sound familiar to you? After spending many hours on optimizing for speed and memory your super-duper MCU application, you can only conclude that it will not run on an Arduino board. You have built the shield (the Arduino compatible extension board) with your special I/O and you wrote most of the software, but these last functions that should add that finishing touch just don’t fit in the board’s memory. Maybe Rascal can help?

Built around a 400 MHz AT91SAM9G20 ARM9 from Atmel, the Rascal is an open source Linux board compatible with Arduino extension cards or shields. Programming the board is easy thanks to a library written in Python from Pytronics that allows easy access to peripherals and shields. The Rascal’s firmware comes with a web server that can serve as a programming interface; you can write your applications directly in a web browser connected to the Rascal board. [via]

Rascal Combines Linux and Arduino - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits