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19 Sep 2013

codebender_editor

Traditionally, you would need to install an IDE, which includes all the necessary software, find and install the correct drivers, set permissions, etc. It can take 10-60 minutes. Or it can be a total mess.

With codebender, you can program your Arduino straight from your browser. No need to find, install, update and manage libraries and drivers. codebender does that for you. Just install our browser plugin and follow our Getting Started guide. From having an Arduino, to having a programmed Arduino. In mere minutes.

After installing the pluggin, you can flash any codebender sketch to your device. See the code bellow? You could load that to your device, straight from this page!

[via]

Codebender web-based Arduino coding tool - [Link]

11 Sep 2013

Flutter is an open source ARM-powered wireless Arduino with 1000m+ (3200 ft) range and 256-bit AES hardware encryption.

Flutter is a wireless electronics development platform based on Arduino. With over 3200ft (1km) of usable range, a powerful ARM processor, and integrated encryption, Flutter makes it easy for you to build projects that communicate across the house, across the neighborhood, and beyond.

Whether you want to check the temperature of a beer-brewing setup, have your mailbox send you a text message when the mailman arrives, control a swarm of flying robots, or just turn on your lights with your phone, Flutter gives you the range, power, and flexibility to do it.

Flutter: $20 Wireless Arduino with half mile (1km) range - [Link]

9 Sep 2013

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Microduino is… Arduino compatible + Small size + Stackable pin-out + Various extension modules + Open source + Low price == Awesome!

The Microduino series is a 100% Arduino compatible open source hardware, compatible with Arduino IDE development environment and existing Arduino sketches.

All Microduino boards adopt a uniform U-shape 27-pin standard pin-out (UPin-27). Thus Microduino series can be easily stacked together through the UPin-27, and all modules are delivered ready to stack.

Microduino: Arduino in your pocket –small, stackable, smart - [Link]

5 Sep 2013

cc3000_small

Make a WiFi Weather Station With Arduino and Adafruit’s CC3000 breakout.

As open-source hardware users and makers, we love playing with new chips, boards and tools. And there is one chip which is quite popular these days: the CC3000 WiFi chip from TI. This chip comes with many promises: cheap (around $10), easy to use, low-power … It was featured in many articles around the web, but somehow it was quite hard to use with Arduino as there was no breakout board or library available. Luckily, Adafruit solved that for us with a nice breakout board and a working library for Arduino. In this article, I will show you how to use this chip for home automation purposes. Remember that weather station project? We are going to do the same: measure the temperature and the humidity. But this time we won’t display the information on an LCD screen. Instead, we will transmit the data wirelessly via WiFi to your computer and display it there. Excited ? Let’s get started!

Make a WiFi Weather Station With Arduino and Adafruit’s CC3000 breakout - [Link]


4 Sep 2013

A tour to where Arduino is produced, the most famous open source framework for rapid prototyping.

Tour on Arduino Production line in Rome - [Link]

4 Sep 2013

DSC_3457

techunboxed.com has a designed a simple build of  Arduino board.

Arduino clones are ubiquitous. A quick web search or a look at any electronics hobbyist website will turn up some kind of Arduino-like microcontroller board. Studies have shown that the absolute last thing the world needs is another Arduino clone that adds nothing or very little to existing designs. One might surmise that these are the exact reasons why someone should never design another Arduino clone, yet here is Ktuluino.

There’s nothing original or particularly compelling about the Ktuluino. The name even has “ino” added to the end which has become so overused that it’s often painful and cringe inducing. With seemingly everything going against it, why would someone make something like this? The answer is… this board was an exercise in PCB design. I need stuff to practice on, and although there’s nothing revolutionary about this board, it is practical. Who can’t use another Arduino, or three?

Ktuluino – How to Build Your Own Arduino Clone - [Link]

3 Sep 2013

Yun_board

Let’s explore Arduino Yún’s unique features – Hardware review. [via]

The Yún is unique in the Arduino lineup, as it has a lightweight Linux distribution to complement the traditional microcontroller interface. It also has WiFi and Ethernet connections on board, enabling it to communicate with networks out of the box. The Yún’s Linux and Arduino processors communicate through the Bridge library, allowing Arduino sketches to send commands to the command line interface of Linux.

Let’s explore Arduino Yún’s unique features – Hardware review - [Link]

29 Aug 2013

nitrogen_arduino

What happens to electronic components at cryogenic temperatures? That’s the main question Mikail tried to answer with his experiment using liquid nitrogen and Arduino: 65.3Mhz@-196°C. Check the video below to see the magic.

Overclocking Arduino with liquid nitrogen - [Link]

12 Aug 2013

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David A. Mellis writes:

For a little over a year, I’ve been working on an open-source, DIY cellphone as part of my PhD research at the MIT Media Lab. The current version of the phone is based on the Arduino GSM shield and Arduino GSM library. It sports a deliberately low-resolution screen (8 characters, each a 5×7 matrix of LEDs), a laser-cut wooden enclosure, flexure (living hinge) buttons, and a ~1000-line Arduino program that powers the user interface. The phone can make and receive phone calls and text messages, includes a phone book and caller id, and keeps the time. Everything you’d expect from a 20-year old Nokia! (Except snake.) I’ve been using various iterations of the project as my primary cellphone for the past six months or so.

[via]

Open-source, do-it-yourself cellphone (built with Arduino) - [Link]

12 Aug 2013

How to capture and reverse engineer an infrared IR code and use an Arduino or other microcontroller to replay the command. Oscilloscope and logic analyser capture, coding, troubleshooting, tounge angle, it’s all here.
In this instance Dave captures the NEC (Japanese) code from his Canon video camera remote control on the digital oscilloscope, figures out all the bits and encoding, and writes an Arduino library to replay the code back, and verifies it with his Saleae Logic logic analyser.

EEVblog #506 – IR Remote Control Arduino Protocol Tutorial - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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