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19 Aug 2012

coolarduino.wordpress.com writes:

O’K, after having some fun with stereo version of the VU meter I described in my previous blog-post, now it’s time to do a serious stuff. Studio grade VU meter !!! 24 steps, equally spaced every 3 dB, covering Extra wide Dynamic Range from -63 up to +6 dB. Single (mono) channel this time, no messing around, absolute precision at the stake. Plus, it keeps absolutely Top-Flat linear frequency response from 40 Hz up to 20 kHz(*).

Audio VU meter with extra wide Dynamic Range 69 dB - [Link]

 

6 Aug 2012

Are you considering using Arduino for your next high-tech project? Think of it twice! Check vpapanik.blogspot.gr opinion about using Arduino for advanced projects.

Arduino is a must-have these days.

It’s a great microcontroller-based prototyping platform, coming into many flavors, with tons of open source projects, tutorials, forums etc. for anyone to start playing with embedded hardware. Using a simple IDE and C++ based code, a USB cable and a few passive components, it is possible to blink a LED in seconds or exchanging messages with a PC (well, a Mac too) in a few minutes, without any serious prior knowledge in electronics.

It’s undoubtedly an excellent starter, but how far can you go with an Arduino ? well, pretty far, but up to a point because (as generally in life) there’s always a tradeoff between simplicity and performance. It’s up to the engineer/maker to decide if and when.

Arduino : thank you and goodbye - [Link]

31 Jul 2012

The idea behind this post is to bring together some robot designs and transform them in a new device with new hardware and standard software (arduino of course) and so easier to use.  These robots have three things in common: a mechanical structure, the hardware and the software. While the mechanical part is necessarily different, we wanted to understand if there was a hardware board that could be common, with a unique development system. The choice, quite obviously, has the Arduino board, which with its development environment is perfect to create similar projects.

Robot shield for Arduino - [Link]

24 Jul 2012

Randy Sarafan writes:

Plants liven up any space by adding a sense of airiness and life. That is – of course – when you don’t forget to water them, and they shrivel up and die. I am very bad at remembering to water plants. That is why I built this self-watering plant to do it for me. Using a soil sensor, and an Arduino-controlled water pump, I have created a system that will never forget to do it. Instead of remembering to water my plants when the soil goes dry, I only have to remember to once and a while refill the water reservoir. In this way, I have decreased my obligation to these plants and put it off to a much later date. Perhaps further iterations of this device can be connected to a rain barrel so that I won’t even have to worry about refilling my reservoir, and the entire system can be fully automated.

Self-Watering Plant with Arduino - [Link]


22 Jul 2012

Ian @ dangerousprototypes.com

Codebender is a new web-based development environment for the Arduino. Everything happens online, they even figured out how to upload new sketches from the browser. Before you groan about another locked-up software as service startup hear this: it’s open source! We talked to Codebender about the project.

Codebender web-based Arduino IDE - [Link]

21 Jul 2012

Arduino environment monitor for Nagios @ boxed. Lars writes – [via]

I just did a rapid prototype of an OSH/DIY network sensor for Nagios using all Adafruit components and an Arduino Ethernet. Thought you might be interested!

Arduino environment monitor for Nagios - [Link]

16 Jul 2012

Does this sound familiar to you? After spending many hours on optimizing for speed and memory your super-duper MCU application, you can only conclude that it will not run on an Arduino board. You have built the shield (the Arduino compatible extension board) with your special I/O and you wrote most of the software, but these last functions that should add that finishing touch just don’t fit in the board’s memory. Maybe Rascal can help?

Built around a 400 MHz AT91SAM9G20 ARM9 from Atmel, the Rascal is an open source Linux board compatible with Arduino extension cards or shields. Programming the board is easy thanks to a library written in Python from Pytronics that allows easy access to peripherals and shields. The Rascal’s firmware comes with a web server that can serve as a programming interface; you can write your applications directly in a web browser connected to the Rascal board. [via]

Rascal Combines Linux and Arduino - [Link]

4 Jul 2012

PANSTAMP writes:

panStamp is an open source project created for the enthusiasts that love measuring and controlling things wirelessly. panStamps are small wireless boards specially designed to fit in low-power applications, simple to program and simple to work with. With panStamps, you can measure almost everything by simply connecting your panStamp to the sensors, placing a battery and sending wireless data from the first moment.

panStamps are suitable for any kind of project needing remote control and low-power wireless transmissions, including home automation, energy metering, weather monitoring and robot control. If you are one of these three things: a hobbyist, a professional or an end-user, you will find that panStamps provide extreme flexibility and power when creating custom wireless networks.

Low-power Arduino based wireless solution - [Link]

2 Jul 2012

One of the most interesting shield that you can mount on the Arduino platform is certainly the ethernet shield, because enable numerous networking applications such as remote control of systems and users, web access and publication of data, and more yet, the simplicity of finding and integrating open-source libraries on Arduino IDE does the rest. The usefulness of LAN connectivity has meant that the market would respond by offering different ethernet shield, first of all the original Arduino Ethernet Shield, which was accompanied by the good shield by Seeed Studio, both of these circuits are based on the chipset WIZnet W5100, allow multiple socket connections and can work at 100 Mbps

Low cost Ethernet shield with ENC28J60 - [Link]

30 Jun 2012

The Arduino team is now shipping their latest creation – the Leonardo. It is the first Arduino to use Atmelʼs ATmegaXU4 series chip with built-in USB. This change is big and it has big benefits. In addition to the built-in USB, it offers more digital and analog pins. This comprehensive guide gives you the details you need to know to start using it – pinout differences, hardware capabilities, new software libraries and more.

Arduino Leonardo versus Uno – What’s New - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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