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10 Aug 2013

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AntzyP @ instructables.com writes:

Cap’n ArrDrownHo! is the lovechild of Ardweeny and Boarduino and he’s here to commandeer your AVR ships. ArrDrownHo! inherits pros of both and cons of neither. Pick up an AVR chip and start prototyping instantly on a breadboard! Want to replace that costly Arduino in your project with a cheap AVR, but don’t know how? Use the simple plug-and-play ArrDrownHo! piggybacked onto the AVR to act as interface for programming and provide power.

ArrDrownHo! – Easily convert AVR to Arduino - [Link]

10 Aug 2013

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Niek designed this BareDuino micro, that is available at github:

For some Arduino projects, you don’t actually need that many IO pins. That’s exactly the case when I tried to build a simple RGB throwie that would cycle through colours. I was looking for a cheaper alternative to the Arduino UNO’s ATmega328P when I stumbled across this post by MIT’s High-Low Tech lab. They developed a library for programming the 8-pins ATtiny45/85 from the Arduino IDE. It’s a very smart solution to use permanently in some low pin-usage projects, but you still need to hook up individual wires from your programmer to the ATtiny to be able to program it. That’s when I came up with the idea of the BareDuino Micro.

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BareDuino micro - [Link]

6 Aug 2013

ObdCanShield

The Arduino OBDCAN Shield connects Arduino board to CAN OBD-II compliant car, light truck, or motorcycle.

  • ISO15765-4 (CAN) protocol
  • Arduino R3 form factor
  • Stacking headers for expansion and connection to LCD
  • Joystick control for menu navigation
  • Provides operating voltage for the Arduino board from OBD connector
  • Serial port operating voltage either 3.3V or 5V, driven by IOREF pin
  • Standard DB-9 subconnector for use with OBD-II cable.

OBDCAN Shield for Arduino - [Link]

6 Aug 2013

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Learn how to load Arduino bootloader on a ATMEGA328 IC using ISP programmer and Arduino board. randofo @ instructables.com writes:

Bootloading an Arduino with a ZIF socket allows you to easily program a lot of chips at once without worrying about mangling the pins. The reason for this is that ZIF stands for “zero insertion force,” and as the name implies, ZIF sockets don’t require any force to take the chip in or out. This means that you do not have to worry about any of the pins bending when you take the chip in and out of the socket. This is particularly useful if you need to bootload a lot of Arduino chips at once for inclusion in an electronics kit or if you need to repeatedly program a chip and transfer it back and forth between a separate circuit board.

Bootload an Arduino with a ZIF Socket - [Link]


6 Aug 2013

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A great introductory tutorial about Arduino. randofo @ instructables.com writes:

An Arduino is an open-source microcontroller development board. In plain English, you can use the Arduino to read sensors and control things like motors and lights. This allows you to upload programs to this board which can then interact with things in the real world. With this, you can make devices which respond and react to the world at large.

For instance, you can read a humidity sensor connected to a potted plant and turn on an automatic watering system if it gets too dry. Or, you can make a stand-alone chat server which is plugged into your internet router. Or, you can have it tweet every time your cat passes through a pet door. Or, you can have it start a pot of coffee when your alarm goes off in the morning.

Intro to Arduino - [Link]

6 Aug 2013

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randofo @ instructables.com writes:

When I was a kid my father had a panic button under his desk that was wired to call 911. While I thought this was pretty cool at the time, it later occurred to me that he had this because the neighborhood that his business was located in was a bit rough, and — perhaps — we were in perpetual danger. Nonetheless, I always thought the idea of having a panic button was pretty darn neat. Perhaps this notion stuck with me for so long of a time because I was never allowed to press it as a kid. It was ‘off limits,’ and thus a very appealing idea.

Now that I am an adult and have a desk of my own, I resolved that I too needed a panic button. However, I feel like one that calls 911 has limited use in my line of work, and my opportunity for panic was probably less severe. So, I decided that I needed to tone it down a bit. The under desk panic button that I have created dials my own phone when it’s pressed.

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Desk Panic Button - [Link]

6 Aug 2013

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alstroemeria @ instructables.com writes:

In this instructable we will be recreating a clock inspired by Alvin Aronson’s original design. When I first saw this clock I was very impressed by how clean an elegant the design was I immediately wanted to recreate this effect. I hope some of you feel the same and use this as a guide to be one-step closer to having one of your own

Digital/Analog Clock – Arduino + PaperCraft - [Link]

3 Aug 2013

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Qtechknow @ instructables.com

Have you ever heard of TFT LCD screens? They are great ways to display information from your Arduino, or display pictures. The Arduino team just released an official TFT LCD screen with their new Robot at Maker Faire 2013. It’s very easy to get started with!! This tutorial will show you how to get the LCD up and running, load information from the SD card, and make a few simple projects.

The TFT LCD screen is a great way to detach your computer, and have the Arduino relay information that you need to know onto the LCD. A great part of the LCD is that it has a built in microSD card socket. You can store images on the microSD card socket, and even some text!

Your Image on an Arduino! – TFT LCD Screen Guide - [Link]

31 Jul 2013

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domiflichi @ instructables.com writes:

If you’re like me, after I got my Arduino and performed a final programming on my first chip, I wanted to pull it off my Arduino Duemilanove and put it on my own circuit. This would also free up my Arduino for future projects.

The problem was that I’m such an electronics newbie that I didn’t know where to start. After reading through many web pages and forums, I was able to put together this Instructable. I wanted to have the information I learned all in one place, and easy to follow.

Standalone Arduino / ATMega chip on breadboard - [Link]

30 Jul 2013

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Syst3mX @ instructables.com writes:

After making a 8X10 matrix a lot of people asked me about expanding the matrix to some thing bigger, and some wanted to write stuff to the matrix via a PC, so one day I looked at a pile of LEDs that I had leftover from a LED cube projected and I decided to make a bigger matrix with all the things people wanted.

Make a 24×6 LED matrix - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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