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17 Feb 2014

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zmashiah @ instructable shows us how he build a display to easily check for his phone status, like battery remaining charge, missed calls and unread SMS. Data is transfered to an Arduino board via bluetooth. He writes:

When at home, I do not carry my phone with me everywhere… so sometimes phone rings or an SMS comes in and I do not hear that. With the volume of music played by the teenagers at home, that is not a surprise :-) so I decided to build a small accessory that will show up the number of missed calls and unread SMS. In order to ensure it is very visible I use a 7 Segment LED display so it can be viewed from distance.

Bluetooth mobile phone accessory for Missed calls and SMS - [Link]

17 Feb 2014

RetroWatch

GodsTale build an OLED wrist watch using Arduino Pro mini and a Bluetooth module. He writes:

Retro Watch is an open source project to let you make a smart watch based on Arduino and Android. This text explains about modules, blueprints, how to install and use the Arduino and the Android source codes step by step.

[via]

RetroWatch: A DIY Smartwatch using Arduino - [Link]

17 Feb 2014

ProMiniAutoReset

Ralph shared his auto-reset feature of his Arduino board. He writes:

Various versions of the Arduino will reset the board by toggling the serial DTR line, a feature called auto-reset. Since it relies on the DTR line, it won’t work with TTL serial adapters that don’t break out the DTR line. After writing my half-duplex serial UART, I thought of using the TTL serial break signal which holds the line at 0V for several ms. Normal serial communications would also send 0V, but at 57.6kbps, it would never last more than 160us before returning to the idle high voltage state. So what I needed was a circuit would not reset when the line is low for 160us, but would reset when the line is low for 100ms or more.

Zero-wire serial auto-reset for Arduino - [Link]

11 Feb 2014

WifiShield2-500x378

Boris Landoni @ open-electronics.org writes:

Since now on, it will be easy to provide your Arduino with Internet connectivity by using this shield. The shield sports a TCP/IP stack manager, in order to free up the Arduino from some basic tasks. It’s also essential to equip the board with a library, that communicates with the TCP/IP manager and makes it easier to program the Arduino and to let it communicate with other computers via the Internet.

Despite the proliferation of hardware to connect Arduino with the web, and especially despite YUN, we considered useful to design and propose a new WiFi shield for Arduino, which replaces the one already presented.

A new Wi-Fi Shield to connect your Arduino to the Internet - [Link]


11 Feb 2014

Paperduino 2.0 with Circuit Scribe – Paper Arduino, on Instructables. [via]

What if making an Arduino, or wiring up an Arduino was as easy as printing one out? In this tutorial we printed our own Arduino Pro Mini board using a pen plotter and the Electroninks Circuit Scribe (a rollerball pen with highly conductive ink). Within 15 minutes we printed the board, placed components down with glue or tape, and uploaded a sketch.

Paperduino 2.0 with Circuit Scribe – Paper Arduino! - [Link]

30 Jan 2014

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In this article read about how to build an AVR ISP Shield for Arduino. phenoptix writes:

This Instructable is for the build instructions for our new AVR ISP Shield Kit for Arduino. Its development owes a great deal to Instructables and our own community (particularly Nick!) and I hope to explain some of that along the way.

Let me start by saying to program an AVR chip with an Arduino you don’t need a shield or even a crystal if you’re programming Arduino bootloaders. But if you plan on doing it more than once a shield is going to save you some headaches as setting up a breadboard each time and then worrying about debugging is a pain…

Building an ISP Shield for Arduino - [Link]

29 Jan 2014

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randofo @ instructables writes:

The 8-Pin Programming Shield allows you to program ATtiny series chips using the Arduino itself as the programmer. In other words, you plug this into your Arduino and then you can easily program 8-pin chips. These small microcontrollers can then be incorporated into any project that you want. Follows are instructions for assembling your own 8-Piin Programming Shield.

8-Pin Arduino Programming Shield - [Link]

27 Jan 2014

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amandaghassaei @ instructables.com writes:

The Arduino is a pocket-sized computer (also called a “microcontroller”) that you can program and use to control circuits. It interacts with the outside word through sensors, leds, motors, speakers… even the internet; this makes it a flexible platform for lots of creative projects. Some popular uses include:

– programmable light displays that respond to music or human interaction
– robots that use information from sensors to navigate or perform other tasks
– unique, customizable controllers and interfaces for music, gaming, and more
– connecting real world objects to the internet (twitter is especially popular)
– anything interactive
– automating and prototyping

Beginner Arduino Course - [Link]

27 Jan 2014

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In this article you will learn how to programm an ATtiny mcu using Arduino IDE.

Follows are directions for programming the ATtiny microcontrollers using the Arduino IDE. In plain English, this is how to program 8-pin Atmel chips as you would normally an Arduino. This is cool because the ATtiny is tiny, and – well – this allows you to make tiny things that don’t need a big ol’ microcontroller.

Program an ATtiny with Arduino - [Link]

27 Jan 2014

stripboard-pid-resized

Tom posted his Arduino PID controller shield in the dangerous prototypes project log forum:

Program a temperature profile to mash beer or reflow solder. Here’s how.

This full featured open source PID controller uses a DIY stripboard shield for Arduino Uno and compatible boards. Firmware based on osPID massively revamped and extended, blood was sweated over new auto tune routines. Standalone or remote operation over UART using Java GUI. All documented on Github with BOM, schematics, code, pictures etc. Parts cost about $15, external SSR module and Arduino required.

I spun this project as a kit for Tayda, with the idea that all the components could be cheaply ordered in one place.

Open source PID controller (DIY Arduino shield) - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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