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13 Nov 2014

intrologo-lithium-battery-charger

by electro-labs.com:

In this project, we are building a programmable single/multi cell lithium battery charger shield for Arduino. The shield provides LCD and button interface which let the user set the battery cut-off voltage from 2V to 10V and charge current from 50mA to 1.1A. The charger also provides the ability to monitor the battery status before and during charge.

The charger is based on LT1510 Constant Current/Constant Voltage Battery charger IC and controlled by Arduino UNO. The display on the shield is Nokia 5110 LCD which is very simple to use and still available on the market. There are two different battery connectors available on the shield, a two contact screw terminal block and a right angle 2mm JST-PH connector.

DIY Lithium Battery Charger Shield for Arduino - [Link]

12 Nov 2014

A-e1415074891328

Vincent informs us of this Arduino compatible CT-UNO, the Cytron version of Arduino UNO:

The CT-UNO combines the simplicity of the UNO’s Optiboot bootloader (which load program faster), the stability of the FTDI and the R3 shield compatibility of the latest Arduino UNO R3. Besides, we know many are using Android phone which comes with USB micro-B cable (power bank also require micro-B to charge), therefore, to lower down the cost needed for customer to get started, we populate the USB micro-B socket for USB connection! Program can be loaded from Arduino UNO by utilizing your Android phone USB cable. Select “Arduino UNO” from the board and choose the correct COM port, you are ready to upload the code.
CT-UNO has all the amazing features Arduino UNO offer. 14 Digital I/O pins with 6 PWM pins, 6 Analog inputs, UART, SPI, external interrupts, not to forget the I2C too.

[via]

Introducing CT-UNO, Cytron version of Arduino UNO - [Link]

10 Nov 2014

rftoy_annotated-1024x543

RaysHobby build a project called RFToy:

it’s an Arduino-compatible microcontroller board for interfacing with radio frequency (RF) modules, such as the popular 433/315MHz transmitter/receiver, and the nRF24L01 transceiver. The RFToy has a built-in ATmega328, USB-serial converter (CH340G), 128×64 OLED display, three buttons, and a coin battery holder. Programming is done in Arduino through the on-board mini-USB port. It has three sets of pin headers to directly fit RF modules, and an audio jack to output RF receiver signals to a computer’s sound card. Using RFToy you can build a variety of projects involving RF modules, such as remote control and wireless sensors.

[via]

Introducing RFToy, an Arduino-compatible gadget for radio frequency modules - [Link]

9 Nov 2014

IMG_4391-e1391203511652

This is an Arduino monitor – tester by ctopconsult.com:

Features:

One LED for every single input or output
Can be used with Uno, Leonardo, Mega, Due, Mini, etc.
Also fits with my universal I/O board
Power taken from Arduino 5V and 3.3V outputs, and the Vin
Load on any pin is 10 kohm or more
LED intensity proportionally reflects the pin voltage or duty cycle

Arduino Monitor/Tester - [Link]


9 Nov 2014

webserver-1

Luca Dentella build an ethernet shield based on the ENC28j60 driver from Microchip.

SDWebServer is a complete webserver that can retrieve static elements from an SD card (including a user-defined default webpage) and can also create dynamic pages. This is the latest post in my tutorial about using ENC28j60-based shields with Arduino.

SDWebServer – enc28J60 and Arduino - [Link]

7 Nov 2014

HF-LPT100_or_USR-WIFI232-T_connected_to_arduino_sm

by 2xod.com:

The Arduino’s greatest weakness is also it’s greatest triumph. That is, it is only a low power simple processor, which makes internet connectivity for such a simple device difficult. Often the network interface has a few orders of magnitude greater performance than the arduino atmel avr processor itself.

Arduino Yun is the answer to wifi connectivity for arduino. Ushering in a new era known as the internet of things, Yun is actually a complete 400mhz system on chip. There is irony in the fact that the powerful system on chip’s only duty is to serve the lowly AVR. Akin to “You Pass Butter”

Arduino Wifi With Hi Flying HF-LPT100 - [Link]

7 Nov 2014

collage-600x332

Colin over at CuPID Controls writes:

We want to put our remote sense and control modules out into the wild and read and aggregate them as it makes sense.
Our basic system layout is as below. We’ve got multiple wireless nodes that broadcast data periodically, and a controller/aggregator that will log this data, acknowledge receipt, and do something useful with it. Eventually, we may have intermediate powered nodes that serve to mesh the grid out, but for now, our nodes just send data to the controller.
We’re currently using these awesome little RF units, called Moteinos. They are an Arduino clone that can use the standard IDE with their bootloader. They’ve got the ever-so-popular ATMega328P chip that is familiar to anybody working with an Arduino Nano or Uno.

[via]

Adventures in Moteino: Remote temperature monitor - [Link]

6 Nov 2014

FMFOE1OI236UGEL.MEDIUM

by ohneschuh @ instructables.com:

Capacitive sensors are an elegant way to control an Arduino using the Capacitive Sensing Library. But the sensitivity and error tolerance depend strongly on the hardware (sensor) design. I found a design guideline here and tested different setups which mostly work well if the Arduino was powered by battery. But the sensor signal changes dramatically if I connect the Arduino to a power supply.

Actually I found a design for five (and more) sensors which works well powered with battery and power supply.

Capacitive Sensor Design - [Link]

6 Nov 2014

microcontrollers_IMG_5471

Make your Arduino walk and chew gum at the same time.

Once you have mastered the basic blinking leds, simple sensors and sweeping servos, it’s time to move on to bigger and better projects. That usually involves combining bits and pieces of simpler sketches and trying to make them work together. The first thing you will discover is that some of those sketches that ran perfectly by themselves, just don’t play well with others.

The Arduino is a very simple processor with no operating system and can only run one program at a time. Unlike your personal computer or a Raspberry Pi, the Arduino has no way to load and run multiple programs.

That doesn’t mean that we can’t manage multiple tasks on an Arduino. We just need to use a different approach. Since there is no operating system to help us out, We have to take matters into our own hands.

Multi-tasking the Arduino - [Link]

30 Oct 2014

ReyPlaying

LED matrices are a popular mean of displaying text, graphics, and animated information at gas stations, convenient stores, and many other public places. Raj’s new project is about making a Bluetooth-enabled 8×64 LED matrix display, where you can send the text messages through a smartphone over a Bluetooth connection. He used Arduino as the main controller and an HC-06 Bluetooth adapter to receive data from the smartphone. He has shared all of his design files and Arduino firmware on his blog.

DIY LED Matrix Display with Bluetooth support - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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