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8 Sep 2012

The micro-sized, Arduino enabled, usb development board – cheap enough to leave in any project! Erik Kettenburg writes:

The Story: We set out to build a little brother to the wonderful Arduino line of development boards – we were tired of leaving our valuable Arduino’s behind in projects, or worse, ripping apart old projects to build new ones! We also felt the Arduino was too big and powerful for many projects where we only needed a few pins, or an SPI or I2C bus. And so the Digispark was born! To us, the best things about the Arduino is the community, the easy of use, and the IDE – by making the Digispark an Arduino compatible development board all of those remain common. Plug it in, power your project with USB or external sources, program it with the Arduino IDE, and easily use existing Arduino code! But with its small size and low cost you can feel free to leave it in your project, give one to a friend, and use them everywhere!

Digispark – The tiny, Arduino enabled, usb dev board! - [Link]

7 Sep 2012

The wireless modem you’ve been waiting for. Works with Arduino & other micros. Open source mesh networking base. FCC Certified. Cheap. Eric Gnoske writes:

So who’s behind RadioBlocks? A group of engineers who have worked on many aspects of low-power radio devices. A group of engineers who time & time again saw customers coming to us with similar requests, but with no way for us to easily fill them. So we created RadioBlocks to allow people to easily drop a radio link into their project, hence “RadioBlocks” – A simple to use radio building block.

Sure there are lots of radio boards out there. Most have two modes: super-simple serial-port replacement mode, and complex full network mode. Neither of those are useful – most people want to send some data between some devices. They need more than serial-port replacement, but the full network mode is too much hassle. Then many of those radio devices are just too expensive – are you really going to drop $30 or $40 on a single radio node, then buy extra hardware so you can attach sensors? Good luck with that!

RadioBlock: Simple Radio for Arduino or any Embedded System - [Link]

7 Sep 2012

Teensy 3.0 – 32 bit ARM Cortex-M4, usable in Arduino and C by Paul Stoffregen — @ Kickstarter – [via]

Teensy 3.0 is a small, breadboard-friendly development board designed by Paul Stoffregen and PJRC.  Teensy 3.0 will bring a low-cost 32 bit ARM Cortex-M4 platform to hobbyists, students and engineers, using Arduino(R)** or programming directly in C language.

Based on a 32 bit ARM chip, Teensy 3.0 aims to greatly increase the computing capability and peripheral features, but maintain the same easy-to-use platform that has made Teensy 2.0 so successful.

Teensy 3.0 has been in development for well over 1 year.  Many prototypes have been built.  The photo above is the final prototype.

Teensy 3.0 – 32 bit ARM Cortex-M4 - [Link]

7 Sep 2012

The Inebriator – Home made Arduino powered cocktail Machine, dispensing the signature cocktail “The Inebriator”

The Inebriator – Arduino Cocktail Machine - [Link]


6 Sep 2012

Arduino Lab by HobbyLab – [via]

Multi-functional logic analyzer and signal generator on Arduino-compatible shield. Simply place it on your Arduino and see all digital signals on the computer screen.

Arduino Lab by HobbyLab - [Link]

4 Sep 2012

Where Arduinos are Born: Touring a PCB Factory @ bunnie’s blog – [via]

Arduinos are made in Scarmagno, Italy, a small town near the Olivetti factories on the outskirts of Torino. All of the circuit board fabrication, board stuffing and distribution is handled out of that small town. I was really excited to see the factories, and I’d like to share some photos of them with you. The highlight of my tour was “System Electronica”, the PCB factory which makes the Arduino PCBs.

Where Arduinos are Born: Touring a PCB Factory - [Link]

3 Sep 2012

This is a shield for Arduino designed and based on the module GSM/GPRS SIM900 or the GSM/GPRS & GPS module SIM908, to make calls, voice and data connections via GPRS. This new version has several new hardware features, that allow maximum customization and provide many configurations. With a microphone and a headset with a 3.5 mm jack (just the standard headphones for computers), you can make a voice call from Arduino!!

GSM GPS shield for Arduino - [Link]

31 Aug 2012

Chris @ PyroElectro.com writes:

A tachometer is a useful tool for counting the RPM (rotations per minute) of a wheel or basically anything that spins. The easiest way to build a tachometer is using a transmitter and receiver. When the link between them is broken, you know that something is spinning and can execute some code that calculates the current RPM of whatever is spinning to break the transmitter/receiver link.

In this article we will explore how to use an IR transmitter and receiver break-beam pair similar to the PIC Tachometer project I built a few months ago, but because of popular demand, the Arduino system will be used for all the processing and break-beam interruption counting. The end result will be a 16×2 LCD displaying the RPM of some computer fans.

Arduino Tachometer - [Link]

27 Aug 2012

Ishan Karve writes:

I have made a 16×8 led word clock, a rectangular one. Break from square or almost square ones. This one is a complete modular design and can be scaled up or down in size / complexity according to ones need. The whole design and requisite files are in open domain and the project has also some good 3d pcb renders. The main clock controller is arduino-like and is again scalable.

The LED panel is composed of 8 individual panels of 4×4 LEDs. Each group of 4 such panels will be controlled by a MAX7219. Here are the schematics and board layouts of the 4×4 LED board and LED driver … They are on the way to a fab house….In the meantime I shall do 3D render of my project. Schematics & PCB designed using Eagle CAD 6.2.0 Lite Running on Linux Box.

16×8 LED Word Clock - [Link]

19 Aug 2012

A little known feature of Arduinos and many other AVR chips is the ability to measure the internal 1.1 volt reference. This feature can be exploited to improve the accuracy of the Arduino function – analogRead() when using the default analog reference. It can also be used to measure the Vcc supplied to the AVR chip, which provides a means of monitoring battery voltage without using a precious analog pin to do so.

Secret Arduino Voltmeter – Measure Battery Voltage - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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