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26 Oct 2011

Chris The Carpenter has put together possibly the most complete robot module for the Propeller Platform. Called the 444AVXB, he writes… [via]

Let’s start with the name, 444-AVXB stands for:
4 Amps (2 amps x 2 motors) via a L298 motor driver
4 ADC’s (Analog inputs) via a MCP3204 chip
4 Servos with connections to power and with current-limiting resistors on the signal wires
Audio-out (non-amplified)
Video-out via a standard RCA jack
Connections for an X-bee
Connections for a BlueSmirf Bluetooth unit

he 444-AVXB was designed with the robot hobbyist in mind. Connections are available for just about every “standard” thing you would find on a small to medium-sized robot. A hefty motor driver handles decent-sized motors with nice screw terminals for both power and motor connections. (4) 3-pin connections are provided for servos which can be powered by either external power or on-board power. An ADC chip allows for 4 analog inputs to be read, great for analog sensors, pots, LDR’s etc.

Video-out takes advantage of the awesome video capability of the prop and can be connected to any TV with a “video-in” and/or many of the cheapie 7” LCD screens (found on Ebay). Audio is just that, audio out with the circuit being the same as can be found on many other propeller products. Pin 15 has been brought forward as well for a Ping))) sonar unit. Finally, there is room and connections for EITHER an X-bee or Bluetooth module. All unused pins are accessible via female headers.

A Robot Module with Everything - [Link]

23 Oct 2011

Mike is just controlling a CNC over the web with an iPad, no biggie – [via]

Controlling my cnc over the web with my ipad so I mocked up a powertail with an arduino to turn the spindle on/off. Took the original housing off and it fits easily into my adafruit arduino case. Matt Ratto made an on off button for me in processing that can leave on my desktop and click remotely.

Controlling a CNC over the web with an iPad - [Link]

23 Oct 2011

RiderNet V2 – an All-Weather Arduino-Managed WiFi Network… Kris writes – [via]

RiderNet is an all-weather arduino-managed 802.11g WiFi network made from 6 exterior and 3 interior Netgear WNDR3300 WiFi routers and Arduino Mega 2560s in a mineral oil tank. The mineral oil provides temperature stabilizaiton in freezing cold and very hot conditions, an aquarium pump and heater provide circulation and heating in the winter. These will be installed around Misty Brae Farm on trees, barns and other spots to provide complete WiFi coverage of our Pony Club Center in Virginia. The electronics were inspired by Adafruit Industires, which provided all the tutorials and great parts I got the project.

After completion I took these screenshots, and dressed one of them up with a breakdown of the RiderNet components. This unit is the “Showcase Model”, as I mounted a VFD LCD and one of the new Adafruit temp/humidity sensors outside the router for exterior measurements. This one will go in the main barn, so it wont be directly exposed to rain/snow – so I figured it would be nice to have the temp/humidity of the barn displayed on the VFD. The VFD LCD working with the “showcase” router looks very nice – especially at night.

RiderNet V2 – an All-Weather Arduino-Managed WiFi Network - [Link]

23 Oct 2011

 

How-To: Shrinkify Your Arduino Projects @ MAKE. Matt writes… [via]

Ever since I started making projects with the Arduino, I’ve had a desire to shrink them down to a single, small circuit board. One of my first projects, a customizable SLR intervalometer, was packed in a phonebook-sized cardboard box and used the Arduino Deumilanove connected to a breadboard with jumper wires. I brought the box out to Central Park at 5am to make a timelapse of the sunrise, but when I got to the park, I spent 20 minutes fixing the connections between the Arduino, the breadboard, and the components. Since then, I’ve explored a few different ways of shrinking projects down and making them more robust. For the intervalometer, I designed a circuit board that had female header pins to seat an Arduino Nano. It was a huge improvement on the design, but I knew I could do a lot better.

I tried to teach myself AVR programming, but ran into a lot of snags along the way. By the time I got an LED to blink, I had invested hours in the project (a stark contrast to my first Arduino experience) and was feeling quite discouraged. I also tried using PICAXE chips. While it was much easier to get started with these chips than with AVR programming, I felt like I was abandoning all my years of C programming to learn a form of BASIC that’s an entirely different animal from when I used it as a kid.

How-To: Shrinkify Your Arduino Projects - [Link]


18 Oct 2011

sustburbia.blogspot.com writes:

Back in July I was contacted by Nikki of fizzPop Hackspace in Birmingham about making very low cost Arduino clones on stripboard. I hadn’t really given it much thought until I realised how easy it would be to make an Arduino compatible device on stripboard (or breadboard) for something less than a fiver!

I’ve tried to standardise the design, to make use of the ATmega328 pin-out – which lends itself for an efficient layout.
Here’s a couple of recent boards – one is a controller for a spark ignition system, and the other is a general purpose layout – just the Arduino in the corner of a vast expanse of prototyping board.

Below is the prototype spark ignition controller. It is based on the Atmel ATmega328 microcontroller and uses the standard FTDI USB to serial cable as a means of

Arduinoids – The Rise of the Machines - [Link]

18 Oct 2011

The MHVBoard is an Arduino clone kit, which does away with a second chip for USB comms, and instead uses V-USB to talk directly to the main microcontroller.

The kit has been designed to run soldering workshops, and is completely hand-solderable, even by complete newbies (all through hole components except for 1 large pin soltage regulator).

Programming is done via the USBAspLoader bootloader, which presents itself to the computer as a USB ASP programmer, which AVRDude knows how to talk to. Patches for the Arduino environment to teach it about this board are also included.

Since the chip directly has USB support, projects can easily emulate low-speed USB devices using the V-USB library. I have integrated USB Keyboard support into our MHVLib runtime library, and others have written similar libraries for the Arduino environment.

The MHVBoard also has a prototying area available, and our members have successfully used this for various interfaces (displays, nunchucks, etc). I have also built a software controllered 3V->5V boost regulator (using the MHVlib driver) in the proto-area so I can run off LiPos, but that is another project ;)

Other unique features include a 20MHz clock (instead of 16MHz on other Arduino boards), as well as breadboard compatibility. A right angle connector can be mounted along the edge, allowing the whole board to be installed (standing vertically) into a breadboard, with all pins broken out.

MHVBoard – an Arduino Clone - [Link]

6 Oct 2011

adafruit.com writes:

There are any number of projects for which it would be handy to animate LEDs from a PC. Not a microcontroller, but a full-on PC. Media — music and video — are a natural for PCs, and tools like Max/MSP and Processing are a natural for creating media-based software sketches. (We use “PC” here in the generic “personal computer” sense, not in opposition to Mac; Using a combination of Processing and Arduino, everything shown here runs as well on Mac or Linux as it does on a Windows system!)

As a first demonstration, we’ll build a simple “Ambilight ” clone. Ambilight is a feature of some Philips televisions that projects colored light onto the wall behind the display , synchronized with the content on the screen to create an immersive effect. The authentic Philips system is well-integrated into the TV and works from any video source. Our facsimile, being computer-driven, works specifically with media content from your PC. This means its perfect for watching Youtube, TV or Movies on your PC or playing games!

Adalight – Make your own DIY Arduino-powered ambient “Ambilight”-like lighting rig - [Link]

6 Oct 2011

Meet the Pinguino! @ MAKE… [via]

There’s more than just one 32-bit PIC based “Arduino-compatible” on the block and this one, the Pinguino, is a board that I was pretty interested in – mostly because it’s from a maker (for makers) not a company so much and the efforts towards an open source tool chain. I emailed the designer and maker of this board asking about its history, the differences between their board and the chipKIT Uno32. Keep reading for a fantastic overview with Jean-Pierre Mandon and Tsvetan Usunov.

Meet the Pinguino! – [Link]

 

6 Oct 2011

Arduino 1.0 bringing improvements and changes.. David writes – [via]

Arduino 1.0 is coming soon. The first release candidate was posted to our development site for Maker Faire NYC and is available for public download. It brings a number of improvements and changes to the software that we encourage you to test before the final Arduino 1.0 release, scheduled for the end of the month.

The Arduino development environment (IDE) has undergone a number of adjustments…

Arduino 1.0 bringing improvements and changes - [Link]

 

6 Oct 2011

RGB LCD Arduino Intervalometer @ The Custom Geek. [via]

I am getting ready to sell some kits and wanted a good way to photograph the assembly without fumbling around trying to hold a camera in one hand and a project in the other. The answer? An intervalometer. A device that can send an IR signal to my Nikon, triggering the shutter. The video above explains all of the features including; automatic delay calculation, auto stop, multiple LCD and LED feedback options, Li-Po charging, FTDI headers, and manual control via button or plug-in foot switch.

This project will work with most Nikon DSLR cameras without changing anything, but can easily be adapted to work with Canon, Sony, or any camera that will accept an IR remote.

RGB LCD Arduino Intervalometer - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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