Home Blog  





20 Oct 2012

lincomatic.com writes:

I like fast things. And good code. Often, they go hand in hand. This is a demo of my optimized library, LiquidTWI, pushing data out to the LCD almost as fast as the “native” (direct) interface with LiquidCrystal. Only this time, using just 2 wires (TWI).

LiquidTWI2 – A Lean, High Performance I2C LCD Library for Arduino - [Link]

 

9 Oct 2012

DUE ARM-powered Arduino – [via]

Far removed from the legions of 3D printers featured at this year’s Maker Faire in New York was a much smaller, but far more impressive announcement: The ARM-powered Arduino DUE is going to be released later this month.

Instead of the 8-bit AVR microcontrollers usually found in Arduinos, the DUE is powered by an ATSAM3X8E microcontroller, itself based on the ARM Cortex-M3 platform. There are a few very neat features in the DUE, namely a USB On The Go port to allow makers and tinkerers to connect keyboards, mice, smartphones (hey, someone should port IOIO firmware to this thing), and maybe even standard desktop inkjet or laser printers.

ARM-powered Arduino - [Link]

23 Sep 2012

The TWIDisplay 8-digit LCD is an easy to use 8-digit 14-segment transflective LCD display. Libraries for Arduino and avr-gcc are available on GitHub.

Only four wires are required for operation, one for power (runs on both 3.3V and 5V), one for ground, and two for the TWI protocol. To control a display like this, a dedicated controller chip is required.

TWIDisplay – 8-digit 14-segment LCD - [Link]

21 Sep 2012

Breakout – [via]

Breakout is a prototyping tool for exploring the intersection of the web and the physical world. The popularArduino platform and the Firmata protocol are leveraged to enable users to access physical input and output purely from javascript. This makes it easy for anyone familiar with javascript and basic web development to explore the possibilities of using physical I/O in their web applications. Furthermore, the Breakout framework includes a growing library of hardware abstractions such as buttons, leds, servo motors, accelerometers, gyros, etc enabling the user to easily interface with a range of sensors and actuators using just a few lines of javascript code.

Breakout grew out of a need for a simple platform to enable designers to prototype functional web-based interfaces to the physical world. It is based largely on the Funnel toolkit and informed by the experiences of the developers of both Funnel and Breakout as designers, technologists and educators.

Control your Arduino over the web - [Link]


20 Sep 2012

This project uses an Arduino UNO to create the proper timing signals for 800×600 VGA output. The output is a standard red/green/blue pattern. Not particularly exhilarating but a great starting point for any Arduino lover curious about generating VGA signals.

Basic Arduino VGA - [Link]

20 Sep 2012

winneymj writes:

My inspiration for developing this gas gauge was after purchasing a new car (Scion Xa) and wondering what MPG I was getting. After much research on ODBII protocols (Scions support CAN-BUS), and looking into open source software that already existed (OBDuino32K) I delved into my first Arduino project.

This project has taken me over a year to put together from building my own CAN-BUS shield, learning to design a circuit board, soldering SMD parts and then building my own enclosure so I could mount it in my car.

Arduino CAN-BUS OBD Gas Gauge - [Link]

16 Sep 2012

Small Arduino compatible USB host board. Take control of your Android phone or other USB device in your next project.

This project began the day I saw the Google IO 2011 talk about the new Android Accessory Development Kit (ADK). I had never seen or used an Arduino before. I had written a few Android programs but something about being able to connect custom hardware to my phone inspired me to start this long trip down hardware lane. Specifically, I was inspired to create motorcycle navigation software knowing that I would be able to create a remote control for my phone that would allow me to control the software with gloved hands. I finished the navigation software a few months later, and it has been a great success. This board has allowed me to complete that project; I now have a remote control attached to my motorcycle.

Mini USB Host Microcontroller Board – Arduino Compatible - [Link]

8 Sep 2012

The micro-sized, Arduino enabled, usb development board – cheap enough to leave in any project! Erik Kettenburg writes:

The Story: We set out to build a little brother to the wonderful Arduino line of development boards – we were tired of leaving our valuable Arduino’s behind in projects, or worse, ripping apart old projects to build new ones! We also felt the Arduino was too big and powerful for many projects where we only needed a few pins, or an SPI or I2C bus. And so the Digispark was born! To us, the best things about the Arduino is the community, the easy of use, and the IDE – by making the Digispark an Arduino compatible development board all of those remain common. Plug it in, power your project with USB or external sources, program it with the Arduino IDE, and easily use existing Arduino code! But with its small size and low cost you can feel free to leave it in your project, give one to a friend, and use them everywhere!

Digispark – The tiny, Arduino enabled, usb dev board! - [Link]

7 Sep 2012

The wireless modem you’ve been waiting for. Works with Arduino & other micros. Open source mesh networking base. FCC Certified. Cheap. Eric Gnoske writes:

So who’s behind RadioBlocks? A group of engineers who have worked on many aspects of low-power radio devices. A group of engineers who time & time again saw customers coming to us with similar requests, but with no way for us to easily fill them. So we created RadioBlocks to allow people to easily drop a radio link into their project, hence “RadioBlocks” – A simple to use radio building block.

Sure there are lots of radio boards out there. Most have two modes: super-simple serial-port replacement mode, and complex full network mode. Neither of those are useful – most people want to send some data between some devices. They need more than serial-port replacement, but the full network mode is too much hassle. Then many of those radio devices are just too expensive – are you really going to drop $30 or $40 on a single radio node, then buy extra hardware so you can attach sensors? Good luck with that!

RadioBlock: Simple Radio for Arduino or any Embedded System - [Link]

7 Sep 2012

Teensy 3.0 – 32 bit ARM Cortex-M4, usable in Arduino and C by Paul Stoffregen — @ Kickstarter – [via]

Teensy 3.0 is a small, breadboard-friendly development board designed by Paul Stoffregen and PJRC.  Teensy 3.0 will bring a low-cost 32 bit ARM Cortex-M4 platform to hobbyists, students and engineers, using Arduino(R)** or programming directly in C language.

Based on a 32 bit ARM chip, Teensy 3.0 aims to greatly increase the computing capability and peripheral features, but maintain the same easy-to-use platform that has made Teensy 2.0 so successful.

Teensy 3.0 has been in development for well over 1 year.  Many prototypes have been built.  The photo above is the final prototype.

Teensy 3.0 – 32 bit ARM Cortex-M4 - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits