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9 Jan 2012

open-electronics.org writes:

Using an ATmega 2560 and therefore the heart of Arduino, we have developed a universal remote control with GSM. This allows to control 2IN/2OUT, DTMF key, gate control and GSM thermostat activated remotely.

We have already presented several remote control with different functions. But now we want to present the best remote control ever made with Arduino.

The remote control is easier, thanks to the availability of several libraries that allow you to do anything to the Arduino microprocessor; if there is not really a specific library, you can modify an existing one. Thus was born TiDiGino, based on the chip ATmega 2560 used in Arduino Mega. Our system has connectors S.I.L. to mount any shield, each of them is in the same location where you would be in the original development platform, which enables the use of commercial and in any case the standard shield.

We said that the functions of our remote control, ie 2IN/2OUT, gate opener, key DTMF GSM and thermostat can be achieved by using special firmware, well, we could write these ourselves, but we wanted to offer our readers who know the Arduino environment do them. This is the sense of TiDiGino Contest, which you could follow our blog and that has just ended, as promised, we publish the hardware of the remote control and a few routines.

TiDiGino –  the Arduino-based GSM remote control - [Link]

3 Dec 2011

Please welcome ArduPilotMega 2.0! – DIY Drones. Jordi writes – [via]

APM 2.0 is the culmination of almost a year of hard work. We wanted to make it perfect and we finally have it, we are pushing the limits of AVR and Arduino. I’m sure you will love it, and it’s designed to cover all the DIY community expectations (including those that are not so DIY and are only interested for something that doesn’t require soldering skills).

ArduPilotMega 2.0! - [Link]

3 Dec 2011

Arduino 1.0 now available.. David writes –  [via]

Arduino 1.0 is now available from the download page

A long time coming, this release brings small but important changes to clean up the Arduino environment and language – as well as adding lots of additional features. Updates to the environment include a new file extension, toolbar icons, and color scheme as well as a progress bar on compilation and upload. The language changes include modifications to the Serial class, addition of DHCP and DNS support to the Ethernet library, a new SoftwareSerial library, multi-file support in the SD library, modifications to the Wire library and UDP class, etc. For details, please see the release notes or this blog post. We’ll be pushing the updated reference for Arduino 1.0 live in the next day or two.

This release is the product of many people (listed in the release notes). Thank you to everyone who helped us get here!

Arduino 1.0 now available - [Link]

3 Dec 2011

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

Luca made an Amp-meter using the ACS712 current sensor, and the Arduino.

The ACS712 is a fully integrated, hall effect based, linear current sensor. It converts the current that passes through its input pins to a proportional voltage on an output pin. He connected the output pin to an analog pin of his Arduino, and made a simple logging software that reads 1000 samples.

Current sensing with the Arduino - [Link]


1 Dec 2011

How to connect a weather station WS2355 (or WS2300) to Weather Underground with Arduino:

There are several softwares that enable the publication of the weather data of a professional weather station, but they all work on PC, so we should connect the weather station to a computer and leave it on, the idea is not good because the computer takes up space and consumes a lot. At a time when we should spare the energy, its not a good thing.

The project we’re talking about instead operates as a stand-alone application and allows you to publish the weather station data independently on http://www.wunderground.com, “forgetting” the PC consumption and even the desk space.
Arduino controls the dialogue with the weather station to acquire the data and also the Ethernet interface to transfer them, by making the necessary connection to the Internet via ADSL, passing by a router pointing to the IP address of the Weather Underground site and transferring information using the TCP / IP.

Connect WS2355 (or WS2300) to Weather Underground using Arduino - [Link

24 Nov 2011

Calunium: An ATMega1284 Arduino Clone – [via]

Whoa! Steve Marple has created Calunium, an Arduino clone built around the ATMega644/1284 chip. In addition to the larger memory and I/O that the ’1284 provides, he’s also integrated a DS1307 real-time clock and coin cell on-board, and broken out the footprint for an LM61 temp sensor. This is a really interesting project, and a nice looking one, too!

You can check out more details at his blog, including posts about building your own Calunium with strip board and the differences between the Calunium and Arduino.

Calunium is Open Source Hardware, and you can get the board and schematic files over on GitHub.

Calunium: An ATMega1284 Arduino Clone - [Link]

2 Nov 2011

Really great article from IEEE Spectrum on the origins of Arduino. Nice to see the IEEE taking an interest in such things – [via]

The picturesque town of Ivrea, which straddles the blue-green Dora Baltea River in northern Italy, is famous for its underdog kings. In 1002, King Arduin became the ruler of the country, only to be dethroned by King Henry II, of Germany, two years later. Today, the Bar di Re Arduino, a pub on a cobblestoned street in town, honors his memory, and that’s where an unlikely new king was born.

The bar is the watering hole of Massimo Banzi, the Italian cofounder of the electronics project that he named Arduino in honor of the place. Arduino is a low-cost microcontroller board that lets even a novice do really amazing things. You can connect an Arduino to all kinds of sensors, lights, motors, and other devices and use easy-to-learn software to program how your creation will behave. You can build an interactive display or a mobile robot and then share your design with the world by posting it on the Net.

In the meantime, they’re enjoying their unlikely fame. Fans travel from far away just to have a drink at the pub in Ivrea where the phenomenon got its name. “People go to the bar and say, ’We’re here because of the Arduino board,’ ” Banzi says. There’s just one problem, he adds with a laugh: The bartenders don’t know what the Arduino board is.

The Making of Arduino - [Link]

2 Nov 2011

Visual Micro – Arduino for Visual Studio – [via]

A complete Arduino development system for Visual Studio 2008 and 2010. Arduino for Visual Studio is a small free addin for Visual Studio that provides fully featured Arduino Development.

Developers no longer need to use the Arduino Ide. We can code and upload to any Arduino microprocessor using Visual Studio. (not available in the express versions).

Visual Micro is based on the operational procedures of the Arduino IDE and follows the rules applied by the Processing IDE for Arduino. This allows the user to load a standard Arduino sketch into the Visual Studio environment without having to make changes to the sketch or .PDE files

Visual Micro is the most comprehensive and easy to use build environment for Arduino to date. The Visual Studio addin includes many of the features you would expect to find in Visual Studio but that are not usually available in the Arduino IDE.

Visual Micro – Arduino for Visual Studio - [Link]

2 Nov 2011

adafruit.com writes:

We’re working on speeding up our LPD8806 library (for massive installations) and wanted to share our nice-and-fast ‘bitbang’ SPI code for use with Arduinos. we use this whenever we have a display that needs fast updating, but don’t want to constrain the system to using the hardware SPI port! You can check it out on GitHub…

High speed, pin-flexible SPI writes - [Link]

31 Oct 2011

todbot.com writes:

Parallax’s Basic Stamp is the mainstay for hobbyists wanting to add intelligence to everyday devices. A new system called Arduino provides the benefits of the Basic Stamp at a greatly reduced cost, increased speed, and is entirely open-source.

Tiny computers surround your life. In your coffee maker, remote control, vacuum cleaner, telephone, and clock radio, these little computers (aka microcontrollers) are getting smarter and cheaper and becoming more pervasive every day. They can be had for less than a dollar. And you can program them as easy as you can write a web page.

Arduino, the Basic Stamp killer - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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