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11 Mar 2011

Inspired by the intervalometer project at the Honey Jar, Dan Bridges produced a motion activation control to use with his Canon SLR camera. [via]

Arduino motion detection camera – [Link]

11 Mar 2011

Using the Arduino development platform you will learn how to display numbers and letters on a single 7-segment LED display. There are many ways to drive 7-segment displays — this is a fairly simple method.

Arduino – Hooking up a 7-Segment LED Display – [Link]

10 Mar 2011

We’ve seen a number of tutorials explaining the use of LCD displays with Arduino. In most the display contrast is varied by use of a potentionmeter. Here’s a tutorial from Hobbytronics which varies the contrast using PWM. [via]

Arduino varies LCD contrast using PWM – [Link]

10 Mar 2011

Shield to control 6 relay, 6 digital input and 6 analog input with Arduino Duemilanove, Arduino UNO or Seeeduino. The digital inputs and relay outputs are equipped with an LED that indicates the status. The lines of I/O are connected to the Arduino through corresponding pin-strip pitch 2.54 mm. It gets its power directly from the Arduino module, which provides the 5 volt regulator derived from their contacts between the 5V and GND. The mini-relay Shield of work at 12 volts, so that the relays are working properly will have to connect the Arduino module with an external power supply can provide this voltage. The card can be used in many applications and in many ways. Find in this page a little sketch as to manage I/O via serial commands.

Input/Output Shield for Arduino – [Link]

 


9 Mar 2011

Riley Porter shows you how easy it is to replace a blown Atmel chip (the microcontroller heart of the Arduino) and to flash the Arduino software onto the new chip. For a few bucks and about 15 minutes of work, you can have your Arduino board back in business. [via]

Arduino – Replace and Re-Flash a Blown Microcontroller Chip – [Link]

6 Mar 2011

blog.lincomatic.com writes:

ITead Studio kindly sent me a Colorduino for beta testing. The Colorduino was inspired by SeeedStudio’s Rainbowduino LED Driver Platform. Its form factor is very similar to that of the Rainbowduino, and the layout of the connectors was intentionally designed to mimic the latter. Both boards are based on the ATmega368 MCU, and are Arduino compatible. The principal difference between the platforms is that while the Rainbowduino is based on 3 MBI5168 constant current sink drivers and a M54564 darlington source driver, the Colorduino pairs the M54564 with a single DM163 constant current driver.

Also released an Arduino library that works with both the Colorduino and Iteadʼs Arduino RGB Matrix driver shield.

Tead Studio Colorduino – A Preview – [Link]

5 Mar 2011

Arduino Uno @ Technology Review… [via]

As electronic devices got more complicated in the past few decades, it became increasingly difficult and expensive to tinker with hardware. The 1970s garage engineers who built their own computers gave way to geeks who programmed their own software. But now the rise of open-source hardware is paving the way for a return of build-it-yourself electronics. Creators can start with devices such as the Arduino, an inexpensive control board that’s easy to program and can hook up to a wide variety of hardware. People can create projects that range from blinking light shows to more sophisticated efforts such as robotics. The Arduino started with designers in Italy, who license the boards to manufacturers and distributors that sell official versions for less than $50. The Arduino designers freely share the specifications for anyone to use, however, and third-party manufacturers all over the world offer versions of their own, sometimes optimized for specific purposes.

Arduino Uno @ Technology Review – [Link]

2 Mar 2011

The Lol Shield Theatre. Falldeaf writes: [via]

This is a project I’ve been working hard on. It’s a web app, python program and arduino sketch that work together to make it easy to make animations, vote on them, then view them on an Arduino Lol Shield, like the type you sell on your site. Hope you like it!

The Lol Shield Theatre - [Link]

2 Mar 2011

ArduEye: Brutally minimalist (but quite fast) vision sensor using an Arduino @ DIY Drones. Geoffrey writes – [via]

We are finally having manufactured a “shield” board for the Arduino platform that interfaces a Centeye image sensor with an Arduino to form a true (if simple) “smart sensor”. This particular version is about a simple as you can make it

ArduEye: Brutally minimalist (but quite fast) vision sensor using an Arduino – [Link]

2 Mar 2011

makeprojects.com writes:

If you’ve ever wanted the ability to use some form of hardware-based authentication in your projects then this is the board to do it with. The Parallax RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) reader is super easy to configure. It only takes four wires! It uses the serial protocol to transfer information from RFID cards to the Arduino. This project is a quick introduction on using this RFID reader with the Arduino system.

Using the Parallax RFID Reader with an Arduino – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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