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17 Sep 2011

TUTORIAL: Arduino Hacks -Burning bootloader chips using an Arduino.

A lot of people start learning about microcontrollers with an Arduino but then want to build their own projects without having to sacrifice their dev board. Or maybe they want to make their own Arduino variant, that is compatible with the IDE. Either way, a common problem is how to burn the bootloader onto the fresh AVR chip. Since AVRs come blank, they need to be set up to be Arduino IDE compatible but to do that you need an AVR programmer (like the USBtinyISP).

The good news is that you can burn bootloader using your existing Arduino with only a little bit of work. There’s even a minitutorial on the arduino.cc site
This tutorial is an extention of that tutorial. First we’ll show how you can make a permanent bootloader-burner by soldering a 28-pin ZIF socket to a proto shield and use the PWM output line of the Arduino to generate a clock. This will let you ‘rescue’ many chips that have been set to the wrong type of oscillator, or change ones that are set from external oscillator (most Arduino bootloaders) to internal (such as the lilypad).

Arduino Hacks -Burning bootloader chips using an Arduino - [Link]

17 Sep 2011

Lawn Sprinkler the Introduction Part 1. Mike writes… [via]

The new craze for Home Automation is to use technology to Go Green. One aspect of Going Green is about managing resources in a more efficient way. I have seen a number of other hobbyists build projects that manage the amount of electricity or gas that they use within their home. In this project I am going to manage the amount of water I use for watering my lawn. In part 1 of this series I am going to cover the big picture of what I am attempting to do.

DIY sprinkler system with Netduino Plus - [Link]

17 Sep 2011

Arduino Dashboard App @ LVL1. [via]

ArduinoDashboard is an application for viewing analog and digital pin sensor values from an arduino in real time. This can be used with any arduino sketch and now has compiled versions with no need to download processing.org ide. Sources included as well.

Arduino Dashboard App - [Link]

15 Sep 2011

Driving an adafruit VC0706 TTL Serial JPEG Camera with a Netduino @ Fabien’s Bit Bucket. [via]

Earlier this month, AdaFruit released a nice little TTL camera, perfect for security and remote monitoring applications. The camera supports three resolutions (640×480, 320×240 and 160×120), has a built-in motion detection circuit and can output an NTSC signal, all in a fairly compact form factor. The communication with the camera is done over a TTL UART @ up to 115200 bauds…

As I’m working on a security-related project involving the Netduino, it was the perfect opportunity to put this camera to the test, starting with writing a C# driver. While interfacing with the camera over the TTL UART of the Netduino is straight forward, the datasheet describing the protocol and commands required to control the camera functions is painfully sketchy and sometime inaccurate. In some instances, some camera functions such as OSD (text overlay) are not supported in the firmware even though the datasheet documents them or only behave properly if called in a particular sequence, which of course, is not documented…

Driving an adafruit VC0706 TTL Serial JPEG Camera with a Netduino - [Link]


15 Sep 2011

adafruit.com writes:

We’ve updated our excellent character LCD tutorial to include a section about RGB-backlit LCDs, with wiring images, video and example code!

Arduino Tutorial – connecting a parallel LCD - [Link]

15 Sep 2011

Apps4Arduino – [via]

We created Matatino, a framework that lets you communicate between your Mac applications and your Arduino. You can follow our tutorials to get started with adding Matatino to your project.

To see Matatino in action, check out Meters for Arduino.

We will be adding more examples, libraries and tutorials for the Android ADK, iOS Redpark Serial Cable, Processing and OpenFrameworks in the future! You can stay informed about updates through RobotGrrl’s blog Apps4Arduino category feed.

Do you have a hardware project that you need some great software for? Tell us about it, and we would love to help you out!

Apps4Arduino - [Link]

7 Sep 2011

Using VFD display with Arduino – [via]

Summer of 2010 I picked up an Arduino board from adafruit and took some time to walk through all of the tutorials available with it. Since then I have spent most of my time on other projects including my bachelor’s. Recently I have obtained the Motor Party Pack, LoL Shield Kit, and a 20×2 VFD (Vacuum Fluorescent Display) to go with the original board so my interest is sparked again. I have found that the Motor Party Pack and LoL Shield have adequate instruction and tutorials, but the VFD is lacking in beginner level instructions to get started. As such I have decided to write a tutorial for the 20×2 VFD available through adafruit.

The adafruit VFD is made by Samsung and is model No. 20T202DA2JA, this is really unimportant though as adafruit is nice enough to link you to the spec sheets for both the module and the controller chip. What you would be looking for is the pin-out found on page 4 of the module controller sheet.

Using VFD display with Arduino - [Link]

4 Sep 2011

Radio Arduino – uses Adafruit WaveShield!… [via]

What it is really doing is playing 24 music tracks that I preloaded onto an SD card in WAV format. There are also 10 tuning noises tracks that get played when the tuner is turned.

Because this is the first time I did this I had a lot of help. Firstly the chaps and chapesses at Hackspace have been very supportive in teaching me how to use and Arduino, particularly Adrian McEwan and Oomlout. Also Jingle Joe who supervised my soldering of the Wave Shield, Brox who helped me decipher the ancient mysteries of FAT16 and Esme who helped dismantle the original radio… PS I did do some of it myself!

Radio Arduino – uses Adafruit WaveShield! - [Link]

 

3 Sep 2011

Build a Netduino-powered Game Console. Fabien writes… [via]

Over the past few months, my friend Bertrand and I have been working on a game console, the PIX-6T4, which is powered by a Netduino mini.

The console is designed as platform for learning digital electronics and C#: we’re in the process of writing a book covering all aspects of building the console, how its components work and how to write games for it with our framework. Here’s a video of the prototype of the console…

Build a Netduino-powered Game Console - [Link]

3 Sep 2011

SousVide-o-Mator from Stian Eikeland on Vimeo.

Stian made this awesome sous-vide temp. controller, which he calls the “SousVide-O-Mator”. Built around an ATMega328 with the Arduino bootloader, it uses a DS18B20 temp. probe to monitor the temp, a 20×4 LCD to communicate with the user, and a solid-state relay to switch the rice cooker on and off. It also features one of the neatest, cleanest stripboard layouts I’ve ever seen (style counts!). He writes:

My brand spanking new homemade Sous Vide controller (PID controller for cooking). By connecting the relay to my rice cooker and putting the probe and a small aquarium pump inside I’m able to very accurately control the water temperature..

This is basically a heating immersion circulator as used by some fancy restaurants – readily made equipment cost in the range of $1000.. So I made one myself on the cheap (controller + rice cooker + water pump). This can be used to cook meat to perfection

Perfect for Sous Vide cooking! ( For more information about Sous Vide: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sous-vide )

Source code is available at bitbucket. Nice work, Stian! [via]

SousVide-O-Mator - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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