Home Blog  





20 May 2011

If the Arduino wasn’t friendly enough, along comes the Teagueduino from the folks at Teague Labs. Breadboards too confusing? Code have you cross-eyed? Ready-to-go plug-in components and a realtime editor give beginners the training wheels they need to get experimenting right away, while minimizing the fear of breaking something along the way. [via]

Teagueduino comes from a long line of hacks and experiments within our design studio and across the open source Arduino/Freeduino community (particularly inspiring were LittleBits and the Grove System). While the more engineering-minded among us have been quick to dive into Arduino, it has become increasingly clear that Arduino is still too technical and daunting for the majority of other creative types just getting started. Teagueduino is our first major step toward an embedded development stepping-stone that makes building projects simple, while exposing key details (such as code syntax, electrical signal values, and physical hardware integration) that provide a scaffolding for learning more advanced systems and tools.

Meet the Teagueduino – [Link]

19 May 2011

adafruit.com/blog/ writes: [via]

I’m working on an I2C project, but I don’t have a sampling oscilloscope and I need to see what the heck is going on, so I put together this quick and dirty I2C sniffer sketch.

You connect two digital pins on the Arduino to the I2C bus lines SDA and SCL, and Arduino ground to I2C ground. It captures the data (within a certain time window) and then it sends CSV-formatted output to the serial port. You can then take this data and plot it to get an idea of what’s going on on your I2C bus. Naturally, you could expand this to sniff other bus-types, like 1-wire or SPI, provided the signalling rate is low enough. This code samples at about 2Msps on an Arduino running at 16MHz — that figure is derived from the fact that it records approximately 20 samples per 100kbit/s clock cycle.

This code runs a “one-shot” capture, meaning that it only captures data once and then dumps it to the serial port. It starts capturing when it detects the SDA line has gone low. it does not check the SCL line (as a proper start condition detector would).

You can adjust the capture window to suit your needs, though bear in mind that the ATMega328 only has 2k of RAM, so values approaching 2000 may not work so well. A value of 250 is long enough to catch one byte sent over I2C at the 100 kbit/s standard rate. The sampled data is good enough to show you the sequence of events.

If you need very specific, time-aligned data, you should use a logic analyzer or sampling oscilloscope.

For plotting, I recommend LiveGraph, which is super easy to use and runs in Java, so it’s portable.

Quick and Dirty Arduino I2C Sniffer – [Link]

18 May 2011

astroboy907 writes:

This project would be about medium level for a novice, but *hopefully* still provide somewhat of a challenge for more experienced users, as they get into the code and work on improving this. “This” that I have mentioned multiple times, is an Arduino clock, based off of a 4 digit display. I have named this project the “TimeDuino” (but if you have a better name, do not hesitate to add it in the comments!). Its a simple 4 digit clock, driven with Arduino and transistors. Well, enough boring you with the introduction, lets get to the project!

TimeDuino- Arduino based clock using 7 segment displays – [Link]

17 May 2011

understandingmaya.com writes:

I’m building a Blendophone for Maker Faire. What’s a Blendophone? It’s a “musical” instrument made from eight blenders controlled by an iPhone and an Arduino. My friend Usman Muzaffar is writing an iPhone app to control the beat sequencing and solo input, while I’m building the hardware and an Arduino sketch to switch the blenders on and off.

Here’s the next step in the Blendophone project I’m building for Maker Faire: making it wireless. (Note: I’ll be doing a talk about the Blendophone with my co-conspirator, Usman Muzaffar, at next weekend’s Maker Faire Bay Area 2011 each day at 3pm on the Make: Live stage in Expo Hall).

Blendophone Project Build – [Link]


17 May 2011

“follower” wrote in with yet another cool project for the Android Open Accessory SDK. This time, you don’t even need to do any Android programming; your Arduino Sketch tells follower’s Android app what to do and what to display on the screen: [via]

Handbag makes it possible to create Arduino-based accessories for Android devices without creating an Android app. You both define the Android application user interface and implement the behaviour in your Arduino sketch.

Here’s an example of how you would (currently) create an interface with a label, some space and a single button:

configureWidget(UI_WIDGET_LABEL, ID_NONE, “Example Handbag Android Accessory”);
configureWidget(UI_WIDGET_LABEL, ID_NONE, “”);
configureWidget(UI_WIDGET_BUTTON, ID_B1, “Toggle Digital Pin 4″);

Use Android Open Accessory Without Android Programming – [Link]

16 May 2011

Mike Colagrosso created Avviso, a Processing and Arduino library for sending push alerts to iOS devices using the Prowl API. This would make projects such as Snail Mail Push Alerts a much easier task because a PHP web server is not needed in the set up. The libraries, example code, and set up guide are available on Github.

This is a cool project with comprehensive explanations helpful for newbies. [via]

Avviso library for Arduino and Processing sends iOS push alerts – [Link]

14 May 2011

Not long after the Open Accessory Kit was announced, romfont posted a great set of instructions on getting this work with a standard Arduino: [via]

A lot of people have been put off by the price of the reference hardware kit, which is roughly $390. What’s worse, they appear to be sold out until end of May, and Microchip’s cheaper ($80) alternative doesn’t arrive until July. So instead of waiting I decided to write a guide on how to get an ADK-capable Arduino for about $55.

Standard Arduino Works With Android Open Accessory - [Link]

13 May 2011

Google’s open accessory development kit on standard Arduino hardware, not confirmed but seems like it should work… [via]

A lot of people have been put off by the price of the reference hardware kit, which is roughly $390. What’s worse, they appear to be sold out until end of May, and Microchip’s cheaper ($80) alternative doesn’t arrive until July. So instead of waiting I decided to write a guide on how to get an ADK-capable Arduino for about $55.

Since the ADK reference design is based on Arduino and Oleg Mazurov’s excellent USB host shield, it stands to reason that we should be able to build our own hardware kit from these components. I already had these parts lying around from my work on MicroBridge, so I decided to ‘port’ their code, which in reality means just changing a couple of pin definitions.

Google’s open accessory development kit on standard Arduino hardware – [Link]

13 May 2011

That was fast… [via]

Android ADK project that shows the Artist and Track info for the song your Android device is playing from the new Music Beta service from Google. The sign gets the current track metadata from the new Android Music App. The spectrum analyzer animation is just eye candy — it’s not analyzing the audio…yet

Hey look, the first Android Arduino Accessory project – [Link]

12 May 2011

Teague Labs has developed a device for programming and altering the code on Arduinos without the need for a computer. This opens new opportunities for in the field programming and testing of Arduino projects. [via]

The Computerless Arduino consists of two major components; an Arduino-compatible microcontroller loaded with a realtime code interpreter, and a stand-alone 5 button LCD display to display port values and manipulate code. The display can be connected to the Arduino via a 4-pin port at any time to peek at In/Out values, view the current code, and make changes as desired.

The experimental code for this device is open source and available on Teague Labs website.

Computerless Arduino programming hack - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits