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21 Jul 2011

Gijs Gieskes built this 1.5-bit video sampler around an Arduino, a Microchip 23K256 memory module, and an LM1881 video sync stripper chip. For video out, he uses the TVout Arduino library. [via]

1.5-bit Arduino Video Sampler - [Link]

21 Jul 2011

 

TJ writes – [via]

I made a sprinker system controller using arduino and your RTClib (thanks!). It has telnet features using a wiznet module to remotely control it and configure water schedules. I’ve also open sourced the code on github for anyone who’s interested.

Arduino water sprinkler control - [Link]

21 Jul 2011

Easily measuring inductance with Arduino. Handy if you’re building a LCR meter! [via]

Easily measuring inductance with Arduino - [Link]

21 Jul 2011

Build a ‘Klout Klock’, track your influence and time… [via]

Klout exposes a web service enabling developers to build mash-up applications around its metrics and all that is required to play is an API key which is easily obtained when registering an application. My application is the “Klout Klock” device and before getting into the details of building it, you can see it how it works in this video…

The clock is built using a Netduino Plus and an AdaFruit ST7735 TFT screen. I have described how to connect them together in a previous post here. In that post, I had indicated that managing such a TFT screen from a Netduino was sub-optimal due to the memory requirements involved. That statement is even more true with a Netduino Plus which has roughly 28KB of RAM available for an application. This means that allocating a 40KB buffer to manage the TFT display as I was doing it previously is out of the question.

Build a ‘Klout Klock’, track your influence and time - [Link]


4 Jul 2011

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

András Veres-Szentkirályi found an old CGA monitor and wondered whether it could be repurposed for use with an Arduino. He noted that CGA monitors use inexpensive DB-9 connectors, the signals are TTL (0-5V digital), the
clocks are in the range of cheap microcontrollers (HSYNC is 15,75 kHz, VSYNC is 60 Hz), and yet 640 by 200 pixels can be drawn in 16 colors.

He dug through old technical data on CGA and worked up the necessary code, posting the results on his blog.

He believes further development is possible to clean up the timing, so his next step will be to use plain AVR C/C++ code to avoid Arduino overhead allowing finer control over the timing. He would also like to create a character map in the Flash (PROGMEM) and code up a library that would allow the display of text or simple graphics.

Arduino driving CGA display - [Link]

3 Jul 2011

LabVIEW Interface for Arduino Thanks Jose!

The LabVIEW Interface for Arduino (LIFA) Toolkit is a FREE download that allows developers to acquire data from the Arduino microcontroller and process it in the LabVIEW Graphical Programming environment. For more information, check out the Getting Started with the LabVIEW Interface Toolkit video tutorial from VI Shots.

LabVIEW Interface for Arduino – [Link]

30 Jun 2011

Following the announcement here:

The Zigduino is now on sale for $69.99! I’m shipping worldwide and available for retail purchase at Metrix: Create Space. It will shortly be available from Seeedstudio and lipoly.de.

The Zigduino is a pin and code compatible OSHW Arduino variant based around the ATmega128RFA1. This gives it a number of useful features above and beyond a stock Arduino:

  • Built-in 802.15.4 transceiver
  • Hardware AES-256 encryption module
  • 128K of flash
  • 16K of RAM

Zigduinos for Sale - [Link]

18 Jun 2011

A Gentle Introduction to Netduino, great starter! [via]

This “guide” started as pretty basic article and turned into a slightly more expanded guide on electronic design and programming techniques for Netduino. To knowledgeable users, some topics may seem gone too much in depth and detail even for “basic” subjects. However, the aim was to provide beginners with knowledge and confidence they need to become advanced enough so that to design successful microcontroller projects by themselves. Additionally, it is always a good idea to understand how things work, even when we can achieve the results using LEGO approach with shields.

A Gentle Introduction to Netduino – [Link]

17 Jun 2011

Arduino has an analogWrite function. But how do you convert a PWM signal to a voltage?

It covers basic PWM, changing your PWM freqency, and and to design a simple R/C filter, including making use of some great online tools.

Arduino’s AnalogWrite – Converting PWM to a Voltage - [Link]

16 Jun 2011

HOW TO – build a $23 graphic LCD shield… from thoughtfix in the Adafruit customer forums.

All I did was follow the instructions for the Nokia 5110 LCD EXACTLY how they were described at http://ladyada.net/products/nokia5110/ with two notable exceptions. First, I used +5V (shown in the pink wire in the drawing, white wire on the results) for the LED backlight. Second, I followed the pin traces around the proto shield used in the example and built that onto the underside of the Adafruit proto shield!

I had difficulty with the wire at such short runs. Specifically, I had insulation shrinking when I set the soldering iron hot enough to melt the solder to the wires. A more experienced person (or higher quality wire insulation) could avoid this. The LED uses one of the +5V rail connectors on the Proto Shield’s PCB and the “open” rail gathers 3.3V to share with the LCD and the driver.

HOW TO – build a $23 graphic LCD shield - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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