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17 Oct 2014

Turn your toaster oven into your own solder reflow factory shop using the Reflow Master Shield!!!

The Reflow Master Shield from Paladin Enabling Technologies is an Arduino shield that turns your normal toaster oven into a reflow oven. A reflow oven is used in the production of electronics to change solder paste from a paste form to a liquid form and lastly to a solid form. This results in all your components being soldered for you in one run.

But let me share with you why I’ve created the Reflow Master Shield and why you would want one.

Reflow Master Shield – Arduino Solder Reflow Oven - [Link]

17 Oct 2014

ArduinoMicroLink

by elektor.com:

If Arduino is your development platform of choice the tiny self-contained MicroLink board offers some interesting features. At just 50 x 32 mm it contains an ATmega328, an SIM800H quad band GSM module and on-board USB and battery charging capabilities. It has all the peripherals necessary to allow wireless remote control and monitoring and can use any standard 3.7 V LiPo battery for power which is charged when the USB port is connected. The charge state can be checked at any time from a remote location.

The Arduino compatible MicroLink - [Link]

13 Oct 2014

webradio_pic2

Arduino WebRadio player is an inexpensive WebRadio player that can plays internet audio streams up to 64-kbps and is based on mp3, aac and wma audio formats.

The main components are:

  • Arduino Pro mini board
  • ENC28J60 ethernet module
  • VS1053B mp3, aac, wma decoder
  • 84×48 dot matrix LCD module (Nokia 5110)

Arduino WebRadio player - [Link]

13 Oct 2014

arduino-rf-receiver-and-relay-shield

by electro-labs.com:

You are planning to use Arduino in your project but you need some kind of remote control functionality. A standalone Arduino won’t provide what you need but this DIY shield may be a good solution for you. It includes a 433.92Mhz RF receiver which lets you send commands to Arduino wirelessly and four SPDT relays which can be used for switching purposes.

Each relay is capable of switching up to 10A @ 250VAC so they can be used to control mains powered devices. There are four LEDS indicating the status of the relays. The terminal blocks on the shield lets you easily connect the devices you will control.

The RF receiver is a module that can be found in the market easily. It is directly soldered to the shield and runs at 4800bps. The board has an antenna input which lets you solder your custom antenna to increase the wireless range.

DIY 433MHz RF Receiver and 4 x SPDT Relay Shield - [Link]


10 Oct 2014

water-level-controller-arduino

praveen @ circuitstoday.com writes:

This article is a about a fully functional water level controller using Arduino. The circuit displays the level of water in the tank and switches the motor ON when the water level goes below a predetermined level. The circuit automatically switches the motor OFF when the tank is full. The water level and other important data are displayed on a 16×2 LCD display. The circuit also monitors the level of water in the sump tank (source tank). If the level in side the sump tank is low, the motor will not be switched ON and this protects the motor from dry running. A beep sound is generated when the level in the sump tank is low or if there is any fault with the sensors.

Water level controller using arduino - [Link]

10 Oct 2014

ArduinoGemma

by elektor.com:

In a presentation at the Maker Faire held in Rome this weekend Arduino co-founder Massimo Banzi gave a preview of the soon to be released Gemma wearable Arduino board. The 27 mm diameter board contains an ATtiny85 processor programmable from the Arduino IDE via Gemma’s micro USB connector. The design is a collaborative effort together with Adafruit Industries who also worked on the Arduino Micro.

The ATtiny85 has 8K of flash and 5 I/O pins, including analog inputs and PWM outputs. It was designed with a USB bootloader so you can plug it into any computer and reprogram it over a USB port (it uses 2 of the 5 I/O pins, leaving you with 3). Ideal for small & simple projects sewn with conductive thread, the Arduino Gemma fits the needs of most of entry-level wearable creations including reading sensors and driving addressable LED pixels.

The Arduino Gemma - [Link]

9 Oct 2014

arduinofinished

by designboom.com:

who would ever imagine that global cultural and economic revolution would spring from the tranquil fields of piedmont, italy, in tiny towns nestled against the stunning backdrop of the alps? but that’s exactly where arduino, the system of microcontrollers revolutionzing the maker movement and pioneering the concept of opensource hardware, was born in 2005 and continues to make its home today.

arduino’s story is unusual to say the least. five colleagues, seeking to empower students with the tools to create, developed the platform in 2005. now distributors estimate that over one million arduinos have been sold, and the arduino community is among the most resilent and inventive on the internet. forums like instructables and arduino’s own scuola connect enthusiasts to learn from one another, and arduino users build on the platform to open up new creative possibilities.

Arduino factory + production tour in turin, italy - [Link]

6 Oct 2014

esp8266eval-600x450

by dangerousprototypes.com:

Ray Wang has been experimenting with the ESP8266 Serial-to-WiFi module, which has gained much hype recently. “The module is very compact, easy to interface with, and inexpensive. I wrote an Arduino program to show how to use the Arduino to communicate with the WiFi module and set up a very simple web server.” Check out the blog post at RaysHobby.

First impression on the ESP8266 serial-to-WiFi module - [Link]

6 Oct 2014

nixie-600x398

Kevin Rye writes:

I’m in the very early stages of prototyping a nixie clock. I picked up some MJE340 power transistors to switch on some IN-3s. I can then use a digital pin on my Arduino to turn on the IN-3s through the transistor. I’ll then have myself a blinking colon for my nixie tube clock.

[via]

Flashing a Nixie with an Arduino - [Link]

6 Oct 2014

IMG_20141002_155652-600x449

The Arduino and Cloud-based homebrewing controller by Martin Kennedy of TheBedroomLaboratory:

It’s just a basic site, based on this Scotch.io tutorial, which is currently plotting the temperature in my sitting room. It’s got a PHP backend (Laravel framework with RESTful API), MySQL database and an AngularJS frontend with (n3-chart/d3 for the graph). In the house, I’ve whacked together a quick breadboard circuit which comprises of an Arduino clone, a DS18B20 Temperature Sensor (with resistor for the i2c connection) and an ESP8266 module. Every minute, this wireless sensor POSTs the temperature to our REST API. This value is saved in the database and will appear in the graph whenever the page is opened. To hook it up to a fermenter, the sensor would just be placed in a thermowell in the fermenter bucket so we can see the beer temperature over time.

[via]

Brewmonitor: The Arduino-powered, cloud-based homebrewing controller - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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