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6 Jan 2015

FRDZIFTHD4VM5Q5.MEDIUM

by siemenwauters @ instructables.com:

this is my first instructable. i show you updates on my cnc machine which will cost about 200 euro’s for still decent quality.
don’t hate if you don’t like this instructable, I’m just an 18 years old student from belguim sharing his ideas and creations with other people. because i think working together and sharing idea’s will make better projects.

this is what the machine looks like right now. ill post new photos every time i advance building

i know my video’s are not the best. i’m working hard to show you how everything works so it would be nice if you watched at least a peace of all of them to support my project.

Cheap Arduino CNC – [Link]

5 Jan 2015

BMP180_11

“Raz” over embedded-lab.com has written a tutorial on how to interface BMP180 temperature and barometric pressure sensor with Arduino UNO board. The BMP180 is a new generation sensor coming on a LGA package and it’s able to measure pressure in the range of 300 to 1100hPa using low power and achieving low noise measurements. The interface is a standard I2C and sensor is fully factory calibrated. The voltage required to power the IC is 3.3V, so your Arduino must provide 3.3V. On this tutorial the data is displayed on a 1.44″ TFT display and “Raz” moved a step further calculating the altitude from the derived pressure. Code and libraries are supplied on the link below.

Interfacing BMP180 temperature and pressure sensor on Arduino UNO – [Link]

5 Jan 2015

meter

by jacobquatier.com:

Been awhile since I posted anything here, so I thought I’d use this post to give some more detail on a project I just completed. The whole idea was to create a giant meter to show website response time almost like a speedometer would. The result is something that’s both fun to watch and provides a meaningful ‘heartbeat’ of current status. After several revisions and different designs along the way, I ended up with what you see here.

Server response time meter – [Link]

2 Jan 2015

F89F9LJI49RMTLA.MEDIUM

by DIY Hacks and How Tos @ instructables.com:

The Clapper was a popular gadget in the 80’s and 90’s. It let you turn appliances on and off just by clapping. This can be pretty useful, but it has some limitations. First there is the problem of loud noises accidentally turning the lights off. Also, you can’t control multiple outlets independently of each other.

So I decided to make programmable version of the Clapper using an Arduino microcontroller. The Arduino lets you set codes for each outlet. This eliminates false triggering and lets you control multiple outlets independently. Your lamp could be turned on and off with one clapping pattern and your fan could be controlled with another pattern.

Sound Activated Outlet – [Link]


30 Dec 2014

20140930_223552

by lfaessler @ soldernerd.com:

My aim is to build an ultrasonic anemometer based on a Arduino Uno board. Now what’s an anemometer? That’s just a fancy name for a wind meter. I want to be able to measure both wind speed and wind direction with high accuracy. Most wind meters are of the cup or vane variety. They turn wind into mechanical motion and then measure that motion to calculate wind speed and possibly direction. An ultrasonic anemometer on the other hand sends and receives ultrasonic pulses and measures the time-of-flight. From the time-of-flight (or the time difference, depending on your approach) you can then calculate the wind speed in a given direction. Add a second pair of senders and receivers at a 90-degree angle and you get both wind speed and direction.

Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer – [Link]

26 Dec 2014

hc-05-breadboard-600x339

Phillipe Cantin writes:

So you want to two HC-05 modules to automatically connect together, as soon as they’re powered up and with zero code? Well this is your lucky day since this can be done using the AT+BIND command.
Let’s do this thing!
For this, you will need:
1 Arduino (I’m using UNO)
2 HC-05 modules
1 breadboard
Wires
Arduino IDE (I’m using version 1.0.5-r2)

[via]

HC-05 Bluetooth link with zero code – [Link]

24 Dec 2014

9e0e86e12eab457883a78438de6273fe_large

by Rabid Prototypes @ kickstarter.com:

The Pixelduino is a tiny Arduino-compatible microcontroller with a full color 1.5″ OLED display + MicroSD built-in!

The Pixelduino is an Arduino-compatible microcontroller that features a 1.5″ 128×128 pixel color OLED screen and a MicroSD slot!

There are all sorts of things you can do with a device like this. You can create wearables like a watch, bracelet, pendant, or buckle that displays color images, attach sensors and display data in text or visual form, display debug information, create a graphics user interface, or even make simple retro games.

Pixelduino – The Arduino with an awesome OLED display! – [Link]

24 Dec 2014

An Arduino pulse sensor project from Bajdi:

I found a little heart rate sensor @ ICstation. It is a clone of the open hardware pulse sensor. The sensor is well documented, and it comes with Arduino and Processing example code.
To try it out I connected the sensor to an ATmega328 running at 3.3V and loaded the example Arduino code. I could now see my heart beat on the Arduino serial monitor :)
I then connected a 2.2″ TFT display to the Arduino and tried to figure out how to display the sensor output on it. Sounds simple but unfortunately it isn’t. Updating the full screen (320×240 pixels) is really slow. So I needed some smarter code to update only the pixels that needed to change. I happened to stumble on Matthew McMillans blog, he wrote some smart code to use a similar display as a speedometer. So I borrowed some of his code and mixed it with the example code of the pulse sensor. You can see the result in the above video.

[via]

Arduino heart rate sensor – [Link]

22 Dec 2014

FRSUU6DI3THEUNX.MEDIUM

by physicsenthusiast:

In this tutorial, you will learn how to build a device that lets you feel radiation in your vicinity on your fingertips, and, if tuned well, feel cosmic rays passing through your hands. You will build it starting only with Geiger Muller tubes, fairly standard electronics components, and RFDuinos. The basic steps are to create a high voltage supply in which to suspend your tubes, process pulses from your tubes and feed them into an RFduino, and then use RFduino’s GZL library to radio events to a glove with vibrating motors attached to the fingertips. (RFDuino also makes it very easy to read data into an iPhone app, if you feel like going further).

Networked Cosmic Ray Detector: Feel Radiation on your Fingertips – [Link]

20 Dec 2014

camera-0706-A

This camera module can perform image processing such as AWB (auto white balance), AE (automatic exposure) and AGC (automatic gain control), for the video signal coming from CMOS sensor. What’s more, in fusion of other advanced technology such as image enhancement processing under low illumination, and image noise intelligent forecast and suppress, this module would output high quality digital video signals by standard CCIR656 interface. OV7670 built-in JPEG decoder supported reatime encoding for collected image, and external controller can easily read the M – JPEG video streams, achieving the camera design of double stream. OV7670 supported motion detection and OSD display function of screen characters and pattern overlay, capable of self-defining detection area and sensitivity.

OV7670 Camera Module DIY Guide – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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