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14 May 2012

A 3D Printer that delivers the resolution you crave. Michael Joyce writes:

Right from the beginning I wanted the B9Creator to be different. Anodized aluminum construction, stainless steel hardware, many thoughtful features that enhance normal operation… all these things set the B9Creator apart from the DIY 3D Printer herd. But when it comes to printing complex, detailed and fragile objects, this is where the B9Creator really shines bright!

B9Creator – A High Resolution 3D Printer - [Link]

12 May 2012

chris @ pyroelectro.com writes:

Since we now have a beautiful robotic chassis, we’re ready to continue our Building A Robot series, and get serious with some motor control. This second part of building a robot is perhaps the most crucial as it will define what type of control we will have over the motors. Ideally, we want a simple method for controlling the motors so that our software is free to do other things.

In this article we will move forward with the Building A Robot series by adding the electronics necessary to control the speed and direction of both motors on the robotic chassis, which we developed in the previous article, Part 1: The Chassis. The two main additions in this portion of the project are a microcontroller and a motor controller IC.

Building A Robot: Motor Control - [Link]

30 Mar 2012

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

The 2012 Atmel Robotics Contest (ARC) is currently underway. The contest is open to university students 18 years or older in North America, South America and Europe, and the goal is to develop a battery-powered 3D version of the Atmel robot ‘Mel’ (pictured above) using Arduino’s 4WD platform (for example, see Seeedstudio’s version) and Atmel components. Contestants can either work on their own or team up with other university students.

Deadline for submissions is May 18th, 2012. ARC contest rules are available in PDF from the contest webpage.

Atmel University Program Kicks Off 2012 Robotics Contest - [Link]

28 Feb 2012

StorageBot – voice controlled robotic parts finder. Danh writes – [via]

Hi Adabot and LadyAda, I just completed my StorageBot project for the Instructables ShopBot contest. It uses robotic technologies to help locate parts in bins using a very unique approach. You basically speak to the StorageBot and it “spits out” the parts you are looking for. I used a lot of common parts from the DIY community like stepper motors, a servo, an Arduino compatible processor and 3 meters of the addressable light strip from Adafruit. My favorite part of the project was a 10 minute video demoing the StorageBot but also explaining the significance of why we Makers build things.

StorageBot – voice controlled robotic parts finder - [Link]


26 Dec 2011

intelligentagent.no writes:

In the heart of the D1 radar sensor is a radar chip based on Ultra-Wideband (UWB) radar technology from Novelda (www.novelda.no). An UWB radar sensor sends out electromagnetic pulses and looks at the pulses that are reflected back. When an electromagnetic pulse hits the wall in the video above, a part of the pulse is reflected back to the radar and a part of it penetrates the wall and is reflected from the cabinet behind the wall.

See-through-wall robot - [Link]

26 Nov 2011

A low cost scalable robot system for demonstrating collective behaviors

In current robotics research there is a vast body of work on algorithms and control methods for groups of decentralized cooperating robots, called a swarm or collective. These algorithms are generally meant to control collectives of hundreds or even thousands of robots; however, for reasons of cost, time, or complexity, they are generally validated in simulation only, or on a group of a few 10s of robots.

To address this issue, Harvard University researchers Michael Rubenstein, Nicholas Hoff and Radhika Nagpal present Kilobot, a low-cost robot designed to make testing collective algorithms on hundreds or thousands of robots accessible to robotics researchers. To enable the possibility of large Kilobot collectives where the number of robots is an order of magnitude larger than the largest that exist today, each robot is made with only $14 worth of parts and takes 5 minutes to assemble. [via]

Buy or build your own Kilobot swarm - [Link]

12 Nov 2011

Olly – the web connected smell robot via waxy – [via]

look close, there’s an Arduino in there. Read more about the project here.

Olly – the web connected smell robot - [Link]

2 Nov 2011

Here’s a blog post that will show you the setup you’ll need to make your own do-it-yourself radio controlled (RC) tankbot from the ground up. This example uses a few kits from Solarbotics to build your own RC controller, communication link, and tankbot using minimal parts. We even managed to get 250 feet of range out of the deal! For this exploit we invite you to move over to the dark side, as the heart of the project isn’t Xbees but instead 2.4GHz IEEE 802.15.4 Radio Frequency Network modules from Synapse Wireless which are actually super simple to use and configure. This post will merely get you started with building a general RC platform, feel free to modify/hack the system to suite your own diabolical requirements.

 Build Your Own RC Tankbot – [Link]

26 Oct 2011

Chris The Carpenter has put together possibly the most complete robot module for the Propeller Platform. Called the 444AVXB, he writes… [via]

Let’s start with the name, 444-AVXB stands for:
4 Amps (2 amps x 2 motors) via a L298 motor driver
4 ADC’s (Analog inputs) via a MCP3204 chip
4 Servos with connections to power and with current-limiting resistors on the signal wires
Audio-out (non-amplified)
Video-out via a standard RCA jack
Connections for an X-bee
Connections for a BlueSmirf Bluetooth unit

he 444-AVXB was designed with the robot hobbyist in mind. Connections are available for just about every “standard” thing you would find on a small to medium-sized robot. A hefty motor driver handles decent-sized motors with nice screw terminals for both power and motor connections. (4) 3-pin connections are provided for servos which can be powered by either external power or on-board power. An ADC chip allows for 4 analog inputs to be read, great for analog sensors, pots, LDR’s etc.

Video-out takes advantage of the awesome video capability of the prop and can be connected to any TV with a “video-in” and/or many of the cheapie 7” LCD screens (found on Ebay). Audio is just that, audio out with the circuit being the same as can be found on many other propeller products. Pin 15 has been brought forward as well for a Ping))) sonar unit. Finally, there is room and connections for EITHER an X-bee or Bluetooth module. All unused pins are accessible via female headers.

A Robot Module with Everything - [Link]

9 Oct 2011

Robot System Description :

  • 2 mobile phone vibrator
  • AVR ATtiny45 Microcontroller
  • IR RC5 Receiver for remote control
  • NiMH rechargeable battery
  • LED status indicator
  • Dimensions 12mm x 10mm x 18mm

Wheels less smallest Robot “ROBO-BijanMortazavi” - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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