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9 Oct 2014

Edison-vs-Raspberry-Piby Michael Hord @ edn.com:

A lot of people have been (usually unfavorably) comparing the Edison to single board computers like the Raspberry Pi. Let’s do a little A:B comparison, shall we?

The Edison is not a Raspberry Pi - [Link]

7 Oct 2014

MAX9632

This compact Fremont subsystem reference design accurately measures low voltage, 0 to 100mV, single-ended analog signals with a high-accuracy, 16-bit analog front end (AFE) complete with an isolated data path. The design optimizes the functions of an ultra-precision low-noise buffer (MAX9632); a highly accurate ADC(MAX11100); an ultra-high-precision 4.096V voltage reference (MAX6126); a 600VRMS monolithic data isolator (MAX14850); and low-dropout (LDO) regulators providing regulated +6V, +5V, and -5V power rails (MAX1659 and MAX1735).This one-of-a-kind AFE solution works in many applications requiring low-voltage input, high impedance, and high-accuracy analog-to-digital conversion.

Maxim Fremont: 16-Bit, High-Accuracy, 0 to 100mV Input, Isolated Analog Front-End (AFE) - [Link]

30 Sep 2014

fridge-alarm

by openpicus.com:

We know you guys like to eat during night (the best time for programming and hacking) but this is a really unhealthy habit and we want you fit and healthy.

The alarm for your fridge activates at a certain time and sends an email (to your girlfriend, mum, enemy or whoever kicks your ass) every time you open the door of the fridge.

Hack your fridge with IoT kit! - [Link]

30 Sep 2014

Hot_swap_Fig1_600x298

by Glen Chenier @ edn.com:

It is often said that “the devil is in the details.” All too often those details are hidden deep within a datasheet where you can easily overlook them. When a datasheet reference circuit is copied into a product, the designer must still be fully aware of how the circuit functions and anticipate unexpected problems that might arise from slight deviations.

Take a recent case of an LT1640 hot-swap controller IC, often used in a hot-plug telecom fan tray. I was asked to reverse-engineer this so our technicians would know how to power it on the bench without a using a chassis. Nothing complicated about it, just the usual slow turn-on of a pass MOSFET in series with the load, thereby slowing the dV/dt and limiting the inrush current to the load input-filter capacitors.

Missing datasheet details can cause problems - [Link]


29 Sep 2014

PICdecade-550x275

by embedded-lab.com:

The old resistor decade boxes consisted of a bunch of rotary switches which make them little bulky and expensive. Stynus has built this microcontroller-based resistor decade box that uses one rotary encoder and 16 relay switches to switch on the various resistances. The microcontroller used in this project is PIC16F84A.

PIC Microcontroller based resistor decade box - [Link]

24 Sep 2014

grenbean-8

by Eric Mack @ gizmag.com:

What if your dryer could send a notification that would buzz your phone or smartwatch to let you know your laundry is done? Well, it may be easier to tap into the brains of your appliances than you might think, with the US$20 open-source Green Bean module announced today by GE at MakerCon in New York.

Meet Green Bean, a module for hacking into appliances - [Link]

3 Sep 2014

F6YTWWUH2WER5U9.LARGE

by drcurzon @ instructables.com:

Hi there,
This is my first Instructable so all criticisms and comments are welcome.
This will show you how to set up a simple wired web server on your Raspberry Pi, with PHP and MySql.

The Raspberry Pi is a good choice for a webserver that will not recieve too much traffic, such as a testing server, or small intranet, as it doesn;t get too hot (so is nice and quiet), and only uses around 5 Watts of power (costing £3.50 a year where I am if it’s running 24/7)

Raspberry Pi Web Server - [Link]

29 Aug 2014

RPiHAT

by elektor.com:

Arduino has its shields, the Beaglebone Black its capes and up until recently the Raspberry Pi just had expansion boards. The latest B+ version of the Pi comes with more I/Os increasing the pin count to 40 of which 26 are backward compatible with the original connector fitted to the A and B boards. Two of the extra pins ID_SC and ID_SD are data and clock lines to connect to a serial EPROM fitted to the expansion board, sorry HAT. The EEPROM holds the board manufacturer information, GPIO setup and a thing called a ‘device tree’ fragment – basically a description of the attached hardware that allows Linux to automatically load the appropriate driver.

HATs On for the Raspberry Pi - [Link]

20 Aug 2014

email

by  Deddieslab:

Actually the first ‘project’ I ever did with a Raspberry Pi was sending a push message to my Iphone. It was 2012, I was lying sick in bed and found a new app on my Iphone called Pushover (what else to do when you’re sick?). With Pushover you can send and receive custom made push messages. On the website I found a simple Python script to send messages. I knew the Rpi was able to run Python code, so here my Rpi adventures started. Within 30 minutes I was able to receive ‘hello world’ on my phone (needless to say I wasn’t lying in bed anymore). Seeing ‘hello world’ on your screen is like the software equivalent of the blinking led, THE coolest feature ever!

Doorbell alert with pushmessage and mail with webcam footage - [Link]

18 Aug 2014

FKFEX3VHYY8JT5F

tanishqjain340 wrote this instructable detailing the build of his analog calculator project:

Do simple calculations with your math box.
The next time you need to crunch a couple of numbers, resist the urge to grab a digital calculator. Instead, round up some variable resistors, also known as potentiometers, and wire them into an analog mathematics rig. By twisting the potentiometers’ knobs and measuring the resulting voltage or resistance with a digital multimeter, you can perform simple multiplication and addition without a microprocessor in sight.

[via]

Go analog with a resistance-based calculator - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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