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30 Jul 2014

2014-07-19-16.10.18

by Martin @ harizanov.com:

I purchased a battery operated smoke/fire alarm few days ago and it showed up today. It runs on 9V and will make a loud sound if smoke is detected. My intention was to hook it up with my home automation system so that I would receive alert if it would go off including SMS, pushbullet notification to my phone, email etc.

The Funky v1 is ideal for the purpose because it is really flat/tiny and would fit inside the alarm. It will tap into the piezo siren and sleep until the siren is activated. Upon activation, it will make a wireless transmission to my home automation system (Raspberry Pi running Node-Red) for further processing and alerting me on my phone.

DIY Internet of Things Fire Alarm - [Link]

30 Jul 2014

curious-c-beeper-600x450

Electronics DIY published a new build, the Curious C-beeper:

Curious C-Beeper is a fun to build little probe that can be used to quickly detect the capacity of capacitors in pF nF range, test their stability with temperature changes, find broken wires, locate wires, trace wires on PCBs, and to locate live wires behind the walls without touching them. The circuit uses three transistors to make a most unusual capacitance beeper probe. When a capacitor is touched to the probe, the probe beeps at a frequency that varies with capacitance. The frequency change is so steep with capacitance that tiny capacitors may be precisely matched or an exact fixed value may be selected to replace a trimmer in a prototype.

[via]

Curious C-beeper - [Link]

29 Jul 2014

wp_20140716_011-11

by superpiboy.wordpress.com:

I had recently bought an original Gameboy DMG from Good Will for a whopping $5.00, condition unknown. Taking a gamble, I purchased it and took it home to find that it had severe damage caused by a battery that exploded and leaked all over the mainboard.

I had also recently started looking on eBay for the elusive Gameboy Light. It’s a system I have always wanted but could never allow myself to buy since they are pretty expensive on eBay. The Gameboy Light is the Gameboy Pocket with an Indiglo light and was only released overseas in Japan.

I had bought a Raspberry Pi a while back and really didn’t know what I wanted to do with it. At that moment, like a Reese’s Peanut Butter cup, it dawned on me – could the Raspberry Pi be used with a Gameboy?

Super Mega Ultra Pi Boy 64 Thingy Build - [Link]

19 Jul 2014

slim_pi

This is Part 2 of a series of blogs regarding the development of a wall-mounted server based on the Raspberry Pi, featuring WiFi and a colour touchscreen. Part 1 can be found here.

The enclosure I’m using, a re-purposed room thermostat casing, places some very tight constraints on the dimensions of the Raspberry Pi and PiTFT board.The plastic used in the case is quite sturdy, and is at least 2mm in thickness. Therefore the real inner depth of the case is about 12mm. As for the width of the Pi, we need to shave at least 4mm from the side. The Pi itself is 86mm wide, same with the PiTFT board, so we will need to find a way of making it closer to 82mm.

Pi On The Wall – wall mounted home server - [Link]


17 Jul 2014

raspiado

by elektor.com

When you start hooking peripherals such as keyboard, WiFi dongle and mouse to a Raspberry Pi it’s not long before you run out of ports and need a USB hub, preferably powered so that it can supply the RPi as well. At this point cabling starts to take over your workspace.

The Raspiado board, launched on Kickstarter should help cut down on the tangle; it has the same dimensions as the RPi board and mounts on its underside via two (stackable) standoff pillars to leave the top GPIO and camera connectors open to whatever you’re building so that it won’t impede the RPi’s connectivity options.

Raspberry Pi without the Spaghetti - [Link]

17 Jul 2014

GPIO

Graphic showing the GPIO pin breakout on the Raspberry Pi B+ board.

Raspberry Pi B+ GPIO 40 Pin Block Pinout - [Link]

15 Jul 2014

photo-main

Watch signals propagate through basic digital circuits. Emulate any two-input logic gate using just one rLogic board and one jumper. To order rLogic+, the breadboard compatible variant, simply order normal rLogic. When the survey is sent out you will indicate which you would like.

rLogic is a basic breakout board for the Fairchild Semiconductor TinyLogic® series of Configurable Logic Gates, with an LED for watching signals and cleverly arranged header pins for simple conversion from gate to gate. Different from programmable logic, configurable logic is manually changed through rewiring using a simple shunt (AKA, a jumper), allowing you to easily and quickly morph a single pinkie sized board into any basic logic function you might need. rLogic requires no prior knowledge, but if knowledgeable of basic digital circuitry then you may jump right in with creating. If not, then a few minutes with rLogic boards will begin to teach you the basics of digital electronics.

rLogic: Affordable, Tiny, Universal Logic - [Link]

15 Jul 2014

RS246-Raspberry_Pi_Model_B+-500x333

RS Components just announced the availability of Raspberry Pi Model B +.

After the success with Model B, three million items sold, Raspberry Pi has been enhanced with several new features and functions included in the Model B + version. Apparently:
the energy consumption of the Pi Model B+ are significantly lower (between 20% and 30% less than the B)
I / O lines have been expanded replacing the GPIO socket with one for 40-pin connectors (pinout for the first 26 contacts remains identical to that of the original Model B)
The number of USB ports is doubled from two to four

The new Raspberry B+ is here for RasPi lovers - [Link]

12 Jul 2014

What’s inside a 1991 vintage IBM PS/2 L40SX 80386SX laptop?

EEVblog #639 – IBM L40SX Retro Laptop Teardown - [Link]

11 Jul 2014

Android-Wear-Tear-Down01_575px

Anandtech tears down the LG G Watch and Samsung Gear Live:

The G Watch turns out to be pretty easy to take apart. There are four Torx T5 screws on the back, removing them gives you access to its internals. The 400mAh battery is integrated into the back cover. ARM’s teardown confirms 3.8V chemistry, resulting in a 1.52Wh total capacity.

The logic board in the Gear Live is a bit more complex. There’s a second layer stacked on the main logic board that also acts as an RF can.

[via]

LG G Watch and Samsung Gear Live Teardowns - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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