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29 Aug 2014

RPiHAT

by elektor.com:

Arduino has its shields, the Beaglebone Black its capes and up until recently the Raspberry Pi just had expansion boards. The latest B+ version of the Pi comes with more I/Os increasing the pin count to 40 of which 26 are backward compatible with the original connector fitted to the A and B boards. Two of the extra pins ID_SC and ID_SD are data and clock lines to connect to a serial EPROM fitted to the expansion board, sorry HAT. The EEPROM holds the board manufacturer information, GPIO setup and a thing called a ‘device tree’ fragment – basically a description of the attached hardware that allows Linux to automatically load the appropriate driver.

HATs On for the Raspberry Pi - [Link]

20 Aug 2014

email

by  Deddieslab:

Actually the first ‘project’ I ever did with a Raspberry Pi was sending a push message to my Iphone. It was 2012, I was lying sick in bed and found a new app on my Iphone called Pushover (what else to do when you’re sick?). With Pushover you can send and receive custom made push messages. On the website I found a simple Python script to send messages. I knew the Rpi was able to run Python code, so here my Rpi adventures started. Within 30 minutes I was able to receive ‘hello world’ on my phone (needless to say I wasn’t lying in bed anymore). Seeing ‘hello world’ on your screen is like the software equivalent of the blinking led, THE coolest feature ever!

Doorbell alert with pushmessage and mail with webcam footage - [Link]

18 Aug 2014

FKFEX3VHYY8JT5F

tanishqjain340 wrote this instructable detailing the build of his analog calculator project:

Do simple calculations with your math box.
The next time you need to crunch a couple of numbers, resist the urge to grab a digital calculator. Instead, round up some variable resistors, also known as potentiometers, and wire them into an analog mathematics rig. By twisting the potentiometers’ knobs and measuring the resulting voltage or resistance with a digital multimeter, you can perform simple multiplication and addition without a microprocessor in sight.

[via]

Go analog with a resistance-based calculator - [Link]

18 Aug 2014

RPiCam1

by elektor.com:

When you think Raspberry Pi and camera you probably already know the score; a small camera board that plugs into the Pi’s CSI connector fitted with a fixed-focus wide-angle lens. This versatile setup has been the basis of all sorts of homebrew applications. The SnapPiCam takes the Pi down a different route and converts it into a 5 MP digital camera with interchangeable lens.

Gregory L Holloway is the brains behind this idea, he developed it as an entry into an Instructables competition (which he won) and the response he got encouraged him to launch it on Kickstarter. The design uses the lower spec RPi A without an Ethernet port and with 256 MB of RAM. The camera includes a LiPo battery and DC-DC converter to make it truly portable and different versions allow you to add a rear touchscreen and various interchangeable, magnetic-mount lens ranging from wide-angle to telephoto zoom.

SnapPiCam, a DIY Digital Camera - [Link]


12 Aug 2014

sd-fux-1.scale

by joshuawise.com:

Around June of 2012, I had gotten myself into a very bad habit. Instead of carrying my SD card in my camera, I left it sticking out of the side of my laptop, presumably intending to do something with the photos on it eventually. On my flight home from Boston, the predictable thing happened: as I got up out of my seat, the machine fell out of my lap, and as the machine hit the ground, the SD card hit first, and was destroyed.

I was otherwise ready to write off the data stored on that device, but something inside me just wasn’t happy with that outcome. Before I pitched the SD card in the trash, I took a look at what remained – as far as I could tell, although the board was badly damaged, the storage IC itself was fully intact (although with a few bent pins).

Reverse Engineering a NAND Flash Device Management Algorithm - [Link]

7 Aug 2014

2014-05-14-20-33-36-600x450

Jianan Li made this LiPo Booster project, that is available at Github:

LiPo Booster is a breadboard-friendly boost converter board based on the TPS61230 IC from Texus Instrument. It has an output voltage of 5V, and is designed to be used with a single cell LiPo battery.

[via]

LiPo Booster, a breadboard-friendly boost converter board based on TPS61230 - [Link]

4 Aug 2014

Compute-Module

by Russell Barnes @ www.raspi.today

The Director of Hardware at the Raspberry Pi Foundation, James Adams, walks us through the making of the new and improved Model B+ and more…

While he was a chip designer at Broadcom, James Adams ran the design team that created the 3D graphics engine that went on to feature in the Raspberry Pi, arguably the Pi’s strongest asset.

Later he moved to a tech startup called Argon Design that was created by the same man behind the original company that Broadcom bought many years ago for its multimedia technology. The 4th generation of that very chip also features in the Raspberry Pi, so Adams was already well versed with its capabilities long before joining the Foundation in February 2013.

The making of the Raspberry Pi Model B+ - [Link]

2 Aug 2014

iotera

by elektor.com:

We have already seen a number of ideas for tracking tags seeking funds on Kickstarter, most systems are limited by the range of Bluetooth communication with a smart device. This system from Iotera tackles the problem using cloud-based thinking: The basic wireless system consists of one or more tags or ‘iotas’ and a home base unit. Each 22 x 11 x 3 mm iota contains a  chip, accelerometer, temperature sensor, speaker, RF transceiver, Bluetooth (unused so far) and a battery to give up to three months operation. Each iota communicates with the home base unit using wireless channels in the 902 to 928 MHz band giving a range of up to four-miles. Back home, the base unit receives the low-speed transmissions from the iota tag and forwards the information to a server via a Wi-Fi connection.

Novel Cloud-based Tag System - [Link]

30 Jul 2014

2014-07-19-16.10.18

by Martin @ harizanov.com:

I purchased a battery operated smoke/fire alarm few days ago and it showed up today. It runs on 9V and will make a loud sound if smoke is detected. My intention was to hook it up with my home automation system so that I would receive alert if it would go off including SMS, pushbullet notification to my phone, email etc.

The Funky v1 is ideal for the purpose because it is really flat/tiny and would fit inside the alarm. It will tap into the piezo siren and sleep until the siren is activated. Upon activation, it will make a wireless transmission to my home automation system (Raspberry Pi running Node-Red) for further processing and alerting me on my phone.

DIY Internet of Things Fire Alarm - [Link]

30 Jul 2014

curious-c-beeper-600x450

Electronics DIY published a new build, the Curious C-beeper:

Curious C-Beeper is a fun to build little probe that can be used to quickly detect the capacity of capacitors in pF nF range, test their stability with temperature changes, find broken wires, locate wires, trace wires on PCBs, and to locate live wires behind the walls without touching them. The circuit uses three transistors to make a most unusual capacitance beeper probe. When a capacitor is touched to the probe, the probe beeps at a frequency that varies with capacitance. The frequency change is so steep with capacitance that tiny capacitors may be precisely matched or an exact fixed value may be selected to replace a trimmer in a prototype.

[via]

Curious C-beeper - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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