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22 Oct 2012

Cubieboard is aLinux computer-on-a-board type device. It features a 1 GHz ARM Cortex A8 CPU, with 1GB of DDR3 RAM, and the Mali400 OpenGL ES GPU with HDMI output priced at $49

Specifications:

  • 1G ARM cortex-A8 processor, NEON, VFPv3, 256KB L2 cache
  • Mali400, OpenGL ES GPU
  • 512M/1GB DDR3 @480MHz
  • HDMI 1080p Output
  • 10/100M Ethernet
  • 4Gb Nand Flash
  • 2 USB Host, 1 micro SD slot, 1 SATA, 1 ir
  • 96 extend pin including I2C, SPI, RGB/LVDS, CSI/TS, FM-IN, ADC, CVBS, VGA, SPDIF-OUT, R-TP..
  • Running Android, Ubuntu and other Linux distributions

Cubieboard: Another Linux computer on a board - [Link]

8 Oct 2012

drcurzon writes:

This version is much more secure and could easily be used across the internet with very few security concerns. A brief outline:

  • A server program that runs on the Raspberry Pi to read variables
  • A MySQL database to store the variables in
  • An Apache2 served webpage to allow control of the variables

Web Control of Raspberry Pi GPIO - [Link]

7 Oct 2012

lightnin9 writes:

Now everybody knows it’s way smarter to just pay someone to host your website. But what not everybody knows is that it’s way more punk rock to Do it Yourself. So what follows are some tips / pointers / instructions for setting up your own home webserver (which will burn a scant 2 watts) using all free, open source software, a Raspberry Pi, and your home internet connection.

The emphasis here is on lightweight, which fits well with the Raspberry Pi. Sure, you can setup a blog with wordpress or Django, and they will run (I’ve tried it, at least with Django). But they probably will run rather slowly. Why? The rPi doesn’t have a lot of memory or processing power, and a database / front end model requires a decent amount of that. If your site / blog ever gets much traffic, it’ll likely buckle under the load. The answer? Just serve up plain old static HTML pages. It’s fast, secure, simple, and easy on the rPi’s limited resources. But rather than painstakingly handcodeing each new blog entry, you can use a static html generator like Pelican to make it easy

Host your own blog from a $25 Raspberry Pi computer - [Link]

6 Oct 2012

drcurzon writes:

This is my first Instructable so all criticisms and comments are welcome. This will show you how to set up a simple wired web server on your Raspberry Pi, with PHP and MySql.

The Raspberry Pi is a good choice for a webserver that will not recieve too much traffic, such as a testing server, or small intranet, as it doesn;t get too hot (so is nice and quiet), and only uses around 5 Watts of power (costing £3.50 a year where I am if it’s running 24/7)

Raspberry Pi Web Server - [Link]


15 Sep 2012

The steps to make a Raspberry Pi supercomputer!

Raspberry Pi Supercomputer - [Link]

7 Sep 2012

The mPrinter is a small thermal printer that prints dynamic snippets of information we call mPrints.  Andy Muldowney writes:

The mPrinter is a small, portable thermal printer that prints dynamic snippets of data we call mPrints. mPrints can be simple text, HTML, images, or best of all, fully dynamic data created from a custom hosted Javascript environment on our website.

By utilizing Javascript, the programming language of the web, we are able to breath new life into printing useful information. Nearly anything you can do in a web browser, you can do in an mPrint. Possibilities include pulling data from a database, using remote APIs such as Facebook, Twitter, or Flickr, and parsing data in realtime.

mPrinter – An analog printer for a digital world - [Link]

19 Aug 2012

Scott Harden writes:

Some days you feel like working on projects to benefit humanity. The day I made this clearly wasn’t one of those days. A little over a year ago, I got into a troll war with my friend Mike Seese. The joke, similar to that of rick rolling, was to get each other to unexpectedly click a link to the Hatsune Miku version of the leekspin song. After several weeks of becoming beyond annoying, I decided to make an actual Hatsune Miku which would spin her leek and bobble her head to the techno version of the Levan Polka for his birthday.

The goal was to create a minature Miku which would perform perfectly in sync with audio coming from a portal music player (iPod or something) and NOT require a computer connection. I accomplished it by sending some creative control beeps out of the left channel of the stereo signal. Although I didn’t finish the project, I got pretty far with the prototype, so I decided to dig it out of the archives and share it with the world because it’s pretty entertaining!

Geek Spin – ATTiny44 Project Prototype - [Link]

6 Aug 2012

This app note from Texas Instruments focuses on understanding and interpreting datasheets for logic ICs. [via]

To assist component and system-design engineers in selecting Texas Instruments (TI) standard-logic products, this application report is a synopsis of the information available from a typical TI data sheet. Information includes a brief description of terms, definitions, and testing procedures currently used for commercial and military specifications. Symbols, terms, and definitions generally are in accordance with those currently agreed upon by the JEDEC Solid State Technology Association for use in the USA and by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) for international use.

Understanding and interpreting logic IC datasheets - [Link]

4 Aug 2012

www.computerhistory.org

Light, sound, temperature: the world is a symphony of vibrations. All around us is a world alive with continuously varying signals. These real world sensations are called analog signals to distinguish them from digital signals–which can only switch between 0 and 1 (on and off) and which exist only in a computer. Many systems have both analog and digital elements: a smartphone, for example, has both analog and digital parts and converts signals back and forth between the two continuously. Over half of the iPhone 4 is composed of analog circuits or systems.

Capturing these real-world signals and making them do amazing things is the domain of the analog circuit designer. Jim Williams, who was considered one of the best analog circuit designers in the world, suffered a stroke and passed away on June 12, 2011. Linear Technology, the company Jim worked for, has loaned the Computer History Museum Jim’s unique workbench so that visitors can learn about Jim and the fascinating world of analog circuit design.

An Analog Life: Remembering Jim Williams - [Link]

23 Jun 2012

diytronics.blogspot.gr writes:

Recently I found a cheap used PS3 at a local Game and Trade that was closing its doors. It’s the older “fat” 80GB model. Everything was in pretty good condition except for the controller. It was obviously the store demo controller and thus was unbelievably disgusting. I had to handle it with gloves on. I entirely disassembled it and disinfected every part of it.

Fixing a PS3 Controller that Won’t Charge - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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