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26 Nov 2013

TB01-brd-600x526

T0m designed a Twin Triac AC switch on DP5050 PCB:

Double SSR for TO-220 package triacs and MOC* series optocoupled drivers. The schematic is based on a design by RobG posted to the 43oh forum.

[via]

Twin triac AC switches - [Link]

28 Jul 2013

FCDFCNGGSILY4BV.LARGE

This is an instructable for making your own PWM (Pulse Width Modulated) flyback driver!

Simple PWM Flyback driver tutorial - [Link]

23 May 2013

How to generate high voltage DC with a Cockcroft-Walton Multiplier circuit. a.k.a Cockcroft-Walton / Villard / Greinacher Cascade

EEVblog #469 – Cockcroft-Walton Multiplier - [Link]

16 Dec 2012

nixe_tube_powersupply_pcb

bleuchez.wordpress.com writes:

I’ve recently become interested in Nixie tubes.  Nixie tubes are neon filled glass tubes that contain cathodes in various shapes, numbers being the most common, and a mesh anode.  Passing a current through the cathode causes the neon gas to ionize which makes it light up.

The problem with these tubes is that they voltages of around 170V in order to ionize the gas.  Fortunately, most tubes only need a few mA which makes the supply design simpler and easy to run off a wall wart.

A low cost Nixie Tube Power Supply - [Link]


1 Aug 2012

Dual-Resonant Solid State Tesla Coil (DRSSTC). Shane writes – [via]

It’s been a long time since I built something that isn’t a robot, a motor controller, anelectric vehicle, or a multirotor. Also, the Edgerton Center Summer Engineering Workshop (responsible for the DIY Segway, BWD Scooter, Cap Kart, and tinyKart) isn’t running this year, so I feel the need to take on a summer project of my own. Inspired by the work of MITERS regulars Tyler, Daniel, Bayley, and Ggy, I’m attempting to build..

Specifically, I’m building a Dual-Resonant Solid State Tesla Coil (DRSSTC). Tesla coils generate high voltage and pretty sparks using electromagnetic induction. They’re loosely-coupled air-core transformers where the world is your output load. (Or just the toroidal “top load” and the air around the Tesla coil.) “Dual-resonant” implies that both the primary and the secondary form RLC series resonant circuits, tuned to about the same natural frequency. “Solid state” implies that the primary circuit is driven (near resonant frequency) by transistors, usually IGBTs although I will be starting with MOSFETs.

Building a Dual-Resonant Solid State Tesla Coil (DRSSTC) - [Link]

11 May 2012

www.philpem.me.uk writes:

Over the past few years, I’ve built up a few battery packs for myself and for other people. Most of them worked fine – in fact, one of the first packs I built over five years ago is still in service, working fine in a torch in the bottom of my cupboard.

The big problem with soldering to batteries is that you tend to damage the plastic separator, and the cell seals. This – as you might guess – is not a Good Thing™. In some cases, solder can splatter over the cell’s pressure relief vent. There’s a reason the datasheets make a big fuss about the vent – in an overpressure situation, the vent is used to release the excess pressure in the cell. Needless to say, blocking the vent with solder is never a good plan, unless you’re trying to get a Darwin Award, or you happen to enjoy watching your battery pack undergoing rapid, uncontrolled self-disassembly.

In industry, resistance welding is used instead of soldering. Not only are the welded joints smaller than solder blobs, but they cause less damage to the cell. The only problem is the cost of resistance welding equipment. A low-end resistance welding machine can cost upwards of GB 2,000.

The Poor Man’s Battery Tab Welder - [Link]

14 Mar 2012

Radu Motisan writes:

Here is an electric fence, perimeter protection circuit, designed to run on batteries, and provide configurable pulses of up to 20KV, to protect a tent perimeter against bears or other animals, out in the wild.

The high voltage generated is not dangerous because of the low current (and power), but it will produce intense pain.

Electric Fence – 20KV pulses for perimeter defense - [Link]

10 Feb 2012

Hak8or uploaded a gallery of high voltage arc pictures. The setup was salvaged from an old CRT monitor. He suspects the flyback transformer produces around 30 kV – [via]

I found some old pictures of me playing around with a flyback, and I wanted to test out this awesome gallery thing I found, so I mushed them together, and well, here they are!

High-voltage arcs using a flyback transformer from a monitor - [Link]

8 Feb 2012

Matt Renaud writes:

It’s time for a little confession: I don’t always spend as much time on my power supply designs as I should. Sometimes I get excited about my latest circuit and after looking for just the right tubes, output transformers, coupling caps, and low noise resistors, the power supply design becomes almost an after thought. Sometimes things turn out ok and there are no problems. Other times I end up with bad voltages, unacceptable power supply sag, channel crosstalk, or worst of all, a hum that I just can’t seem to eliminate. It’s at these times that I always wish I had taken a little more time to get it right.

The truth is, there is no reason to suffer power supply set backs like this. The design of basic tube power supplies is actually very straight forward. And, if we rely on the excellent work of those who’ve come before us (O. H. Schade, N. H. Roberts, D. L Waidelich, H. J. Reich), we don’t even need to tackle any advanced math or taxing mental gyrations to arrive at some truly excellent power supply designs.

Power Supply Design for Vacuum Tube Amplifiers - [Link]

3 Feb 2012

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

Luca is building a Nixie clock, and in this post he covers the high voltage power supply section.

Nixie tubes are digit displays that use ~170V between the digit wire and a wire mash, to agitate the gas inside the tube. This surrounds the digit wire with a orange glow and it becomes visible through the tube.

Luca is using the MAX1771 based DC/DC boost converter to supply the high voltage required. This DC/DC steps up the 9-12V input to 180V output, as a bonus it has an additional 5V output for the rest of the circuit board.

Nixie clock HV power supply - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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