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17 Sep 2011

Simple Examples of Sending MIDI Data from Arduino to Computer… [via]

It’s easy to send data from just one sensor or button on the Arduino to Max/MSP for further processing and routing to music applications. Take the following example, which reads a potentiometer from Arduino analog input pin 0 and sends this data to Max/MSP as a serial stream of bytes. This stream of bytes has a data range of 0 – 127, perfect for MIDI control applications.

Once the data has been received in Max/MSP, it can be routed to a ctlout object, thus allowing control of any parameter in any application that accepts MIDI continuous controller inputs.

Simple Examples of Sending MIDI Data from Arduino to Computer - [Link]

17 Sep 2011

What’s inside a smart meter? @ EDN. – [via]

The technicians at iFixit got their hands on an Elster Rex2 Watt-hour meter with features that an old-fashioned motor-driven meter lacks: nonvolatile memory with 1 million write cycles, advanced security with full 128-bit AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) encryption, the ability to make remote upgrades, and support for 900-MHz and 2.4-GHz ZigBee communication. The meter can also track overall power usage by time, which raises privacy concerns for some utility customers. On the other hand, some customers welcome the ability to parse their power usage to better manage it and, they hope, save money.

What’s inside a smart meter? - [Link]

17 Sep 2011

Light Switch XBee: Example Project by Rob Faludi. [via]

Just finished documenting the latest example project. The Light Switch XBee is a wireless wall switch that can control lamps, fans, motors or your homemade robot using Digi’s XBee radio. It’s a model for almost any digital input device you’d like to build. If it goes on and off, you can make it wireless using this example as your guide!

Full PDF here

Light Switch XBee: Example Project - [Link]

17 Sep 2011

TUTORIAL: Arduino Hacks -Burning bootloader chips using an Arduino.

A lot of people start learning about microcontrollers with an Arduino but then want to build their own projects without having to sacrifice their dev board. Or maybe they want to make their own Arduino variant, that is compatible with the IDE. Either way, a common problem is how to burn the bootloader onto the fresh AVR chip. Since AVRs come blank, they need to be set up to be Arduino IDE compatible but to do that you need an AVR programmer (like the USBtinyISP).

The good news is that you can burn bootloader using your existing Arduino with only a little bit of work. There’s even a minitutorial on the arduino.cc site
This tutorial is an extention of that tutorial. First we’ll show how you can make a permanent bootloader-burner by soldering a 28-pin ZIF socket to a proto shield and use the PWM output line of the Arduino to generate a clock. This will let you ‘rescue’ many chips that have been set to the wrong type of oscillator, or change ones that are set from external oscillator (most Arduino bootloaders) to internal (such as the lilypad).

Arduino Hacks -Burning bootloader chips using an Arduino - [Link]


17 Sep 2011

Transistors: Plugging the leaks @ The Economist – [via]

MOORE’S LAW—the prediction made in 1965 by Gordon Moore, that the number of transistors on a chip of given size would double every two years—has had a good innings. The first integrated circuit (invented by Jack Kilby of Texas Instruments, see above) was a clunky affair. Now the size of transistors is measured in billionths of a metre. Moore’s law has yielded fast, smart computers, with pretty graphics and worldwide connections. It has thereby ushered in an age of information technology unimaginable when Dr Moore coined it. Not bad going for what was originally just an off-the-cuff observation.

That observation, however, is not truly a law. It is, rather, the description of a journey of many steps, each a specific technological change (see chart below). That new steps will happen is as much an article of faith as a prediction. Every time transistors shrink, they get closer to the point where they can shrink no further—for if the law continues on its merry way, transistors will be the size of individual silicon atoms within two decades.

Transistors: Plugging the leaks - [Link]

17 Sep 2011

Learn to code @ Codecademy. [via]

Codecademy is the easiest way to learn how to code. It’s interactive, fun, and you can do it with your friends.

Learn to code @Codecademy - [Link]

17 Sep 2011

Best viewed at 720p and fullscreen, this is truly spectacular. More from Universe Today: [via]

Newly reprocessed images from NASA’s STEREO-A spacecraft, allow scientists to trace the anatomy of a Coronal Mass Ejection in December 2008 as it moves and changes on its journey from the Sun to the Earth. Using a new technique, heliophysicists can now identify the origin and structure of the material that impacted Earth, and connect the image data directly with measurements at Earth at the time of impact.

The different views from left to right are at different scales. The yellow dot is Venus and the blue dot is Earth. Closer to Earth is a dial showing the solar wind density changes at Lagrangian point L1 where the ACE and Wind spacecraft recorded the event.

NASA Video: Solar Storm Enveloping the Earth - [Link]

17 Sep 2011

Gilberd headphone amplifier. Riad writes – [via]

I listen to music on headphones a lot at work, and my source is almost always a CD/DVD-A/SACD player (Denon DVD-2910). Since it doesn’t have a headphone driver, I need something to power my various cans (1, 2, 3). In the past, I designed a tube-based headphone amp but frankly while it’s nice for nostalgia’s sake I’m not interested in “tube sound” (a.k.a. “a lot of even-harmonic distortion”), so why go to the trouble and expense? Let’s get more modern, cheaper, and a lot higher performance. (The name Gilberd is after William Gilberd, an early figure in electrical engineering.)

Gilberd headphone amplifier - [Link]

17 Sep 2011

Lawn Sprinkler the Introduction Part 1. Mike writes… [via]

The new craze for Home Automation is to use technology to Go Green. One aspect of Going Green is about managing resources in a more efficient way. I have seen a number of other hobbyists build projects that manage the amount of electricity or gas that they use within their home. In this project I am going to manage the amount of water I use for watering my lawn. In part 1 of this series I am going to cover the big picture of what I am attempting to do.

DIY sprinkler system with Netduino Plus - [Link]

17 Sep 2011

PZST – an open-source Propeller IDE – [via]

And more in the Parallax forums

PZST – an open-source Propeller IDE - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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