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6 Oct 2011

“Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do…” – Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs 1955-2011

6 Oct 2011

India announces $35 tablet computer to help lift villagers out of poverty @ The Washington Post… [via]

NEW DELHI — India introduced a cheap tablet computer Wednesday, saying it would deliver modern technology to the countryside to help lift villagers out of poverty.

The computer, called Aakash, or “sky” in Hindi, is the latest in a series of “world’s cheapest” innovations in India that include a 100,000 rupee ($2,040) compact Nano car, a 750 rupee ($15) water purifier and $2,000 open-heart surgery. Developer Datawind is selling the tablets to the government for about $45 each, and subsidies will reduce that to $35 for students and teachers.

India announces $35 tablet computer to help lift villagers out of poverty - [Link]

6 Oct 2011

BYU-student-built electric car sets land speed record at Salt Flats – [via]

An electric car designed and built by BYU engineering students set a world land speed record for its weight class, averaging 155.8 mph over its two required qualifying runs, one of which was clocked at 175 mph.

The milestone marks the end of a seven-year quest of more than 130 students, led by Perry Carter, who just retired as an associate professor.

“This is a wonderful closure to 31 years of teaching at BYU and many projects,” Carter said after the record was certified. “But this is the one that takes the cake. I’m done.”

 BYU-student-built electric car sets land speed record at Salt Flats - [Link]

6 Oct 2011

adafruit.com writes:

There are any number of projects for which it would be handy to animate LEDs from a PC. Not a microcontroller, but a full-on PC. Media — music and video — are a natural for PCs, and tools like Max/MSP and Processing are a natural for creating media-based software sketches. (We use “PC” here in the generic “personal computer” sense, not in opposition to Mac; Using a combination of Processing and Arduino, everything shown here runs as well on Mac or Linux as it does on a Windows system!)

As a first demonstration, we’ll build a simple “Ambilight ” clone. Ambilight is a feature of some Philips televisions that projects colored light onto the wall behind the display , synchronized with the content on the screen to create an immersive effect. The authentic Philips system is well-integrated into the TV and works from any video source. Our facsimile, being computer-driven, works specifically with media content from your PC. This means its perfect for watching Youtube, TV or Movies on your PC or playing games!

Adalight – Make your own DIY Arduino-powered ambient “Ambilight”-like lighting rig - [Link]


6 Oct 2011

Meet the Pinguino! @ MAKE… [via]

There’s more than just one 32-bit PIC based “Arduino-compatible” on the block and this one, the Pinguino, is a board that I was pretty interested in – mostly because it’s from a maker (for makers) not a company so much and the efforts towards an open source tool chain. I emailed the designer and maker of this board asking about its history, the differences between their board and the chipKIT Uno32. Keep reading for a fantastic overview with Jean-Pierre Mandon and Tsvetan Usunov.

Meet the Pinguino! – [Link]

 

6 Oct 2011

The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics just announced… [via]

“Some say the world will end in fire, some say in ice…” *

What will be the final destiny of the Universe? Probably it will end in ice, if we are to believe this year’s Nobel Laureates in Physics. They have studied several dozen exploding stars, called supernovae, and discovered that the Universe is expanding at an ever-accelerating rate. The discovery came as a complete surprise even to the Laureates themselves.
In 1998, cosmology was shaken at its foundations as two research teams presented their findings. Headed by Saul Perlmutter, one of the teams had set to work in 1988. Brian Schmidt headed another team, launched at the end of 1994, where Adam Riess was to play a crucial role.

The research teams raced to map the Universe by locating the most distant supernovae. More sophisticated telescopes on the ground and in space, as well as more powerful computers and new digital imaging sensors (CCD, Nobel Prize in Physics in 2009), opened the possibility in the 1990s to add more pieces to the cosmological puzzle.

The teams used a particular kind of supernova, called type Ia supernova. It is an explosion of an old compact star that is as heavy as the Sun but as small as the Earth. A single such supernova can emit as much light as a whole galaxy. All in all, the two research teams found over 50 distant supernovae whose light was weaker than expected – this was a sign that the expansion of the Universe was accelerating. The potential pitfalls had been numerous, and the scientists found reassurance in the fact that both groups had reached the same astonishing conclusion.

For almost a century, the Universe has been known to be expanding as a consequence of the Big Bang about 14 billion years ago. However, the discovery that this expansion is accelerating is astounding. If the expansion will continue to speed up the Universe will end in ice.

The acceleration is thought to be driven by dark energy, but what that dark energy is remains an enigma – perhaps the greatest in physics today. What is known is that dark energy constitutes about three quarters of the Universe. Therefore the findings of the 2011 Nobel Laureates in Physics have helped to unveil a Universe that to a large extent is unknown to science. And everything is possible again.

The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics – accelerating expansion of the Universe - [Link]

6 Oct 2011

Arduino 1.0 bringing improvements and changes.. David writes – [via]

Arduino 1.0 is coming soon. The first release candidate was posted to our development site for Maker Faire NYC and is available for public download. It brings a number of improvements and changes to the software that we encourage you to test before the final Arduino 1.0 release, scheduled for the end of the month.

The Arduino development environment (IDE) has undergone a number of adjustments…

Arduino 1.0 bringing improvements and changes - [Link]

 

6 Oct 2011

RGB LCD Arduino Intervalometer @ The Custom Geek. [via]

I am getting ready to sell some kits and wanted a good way to photograph the assembly without fumbling around trying to hold a camera in one hand and a project in the other. The answer? An intervalometer. A device that can send an IR signal to my Nikon, triggering the shutter. The video above explains all of the features including; automatic delay calculation, auto stop, multiple LCD and LED feedback options, Li-Po charging, FTDI headers, and manual control via button or plug-in foot switch.

This project will work with most Nikon DSLR cameras without changing anything, but can easily be adapted to work with Canon, Sony, or any camera that will accept an IR remote.

RGB LCD Arduino Intervalometer - [Link]

6 Oct 2011

Open Hardware Hub. From the about page… [via]

Open Hardware Hub is the first and only place where you can upload, share, and collaborate on open source hardware creations. Our goal is to become the number one place on the internet for people to learn, design, and build together. We want to provide a compelling community where builders around the world can work together on whatever they have a passion for. Sharing knowledge is vital to making our world a better place, and by connecting intelligent builders, we hope to fuel the fires of innovation.

Open Hardware Hub - [Link]

4 Oct 2011

ALMA Opens Its Eyes – [via]

Humanity’s most complex ground-based astronomy observatory, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), has officially opened for astronomers. The first released image, from a telescope still under construction, reveals a view of the Universe that cannot be seen at all by visible-light and infrared telescopes. Thousands of scientists from around the world competed to be the first few researchers to explore some of the darkest, coldest, farthest, and most hidden secrets of the Cosmos with this new astronomical tool.

ALMA Opens Its Eyes - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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