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27 Dec 2011

howiem.com writes:

Picked up one of these IC test clips on eBay for a few quid.

The idea is that you clip it to a chip on a circuit board so you have easy access to the connections for use with test probes.

I’ve got a different use for it though. If you develop a circuit using an Atmega chip (like, say, a circuit you developed with an Arduino but have now moved to a custom board), reprogramming the chip is fiddly. The best way to make your circuit easily re-programmable is to build an ISP header onto your board – it’s just a 6-pin connector that lets you blast new programming onto the chip without removing it from the circuit.

DIY Atmega programming clip - [Link]

26 Dec 2011

intelligentagent.no writes:

In the heart of the D1 radar sensor is a radar chip based on Ultra-Wideband (UWB) radar technology from Novelda (www.novelda.no). An UWB radar sensor sends out electromagnetic pulses and looks at the pulses that are reflected back. When an electromagnetic pulse hits the wall in the video above, a part of the pulse is reflected back to the radar and a part of it penetrates the wall and is reflected from the cabinet behind the wall.

See-through-wall robot - [Link]

26 Dec 2011

 

vpapanik writes:

A simple device for testing and/or healing Nixie tubes of IN-18 type. An 11-pole switch is connected in series with a 50 KΩ pot (+ 470 Ω resistor for safety), powering from an 180V DC source. Normal operation at 2 mA is shown. For healing tubes, one can double the current (4 mA), baking the tube for several hours in order to remove cathode poisoning. Enjoy !

Nixie Tube IN-18 Tester / Healer - [Link]

26 Dec 2011

Top Ten Things To Do In 2012 @ ECN: Electronic Component News – [via]

0b0000.0000: Build something open source. It’s amazing what is available. Back in the heyday of hobby electronics, it was easy to find projects in magazines such as “Popular Electronics.” You could get kits from Heathkit of RadioShack. But, for the most part, all of those things went away. With Open Source, you can build an almost unlimited variety of gadgets. What’s more, you can taylor your build to your experience level. If you want to do it all, just get the files, fab your boards, buy your parts and solder it up. If you’re less ambitious, buy a complete kit. If you’re even more ambitious, mod the design and post it up for the community.

Top Ten Things To Do In 2012 - [Link]


26 Dec 2011

The Audrey Braille Display – LIVE! @ Utopia Mechanicus. David writes – [via]

It’s taken far longer than I wanted, but I am finally looking at a finished prototype for the Audrey Braille Display. Made of 3mm Acrylic laser-cut pieces (via the Victoria Makerspace laser cutter), it uses two stepper motors, connects to an Arduino (and LadyAda Motor Driver board), and displays 5 characters.

The Audrey Braille Display - [Link]

 

26 Dec 2011

embedded-lab.com writes:

Because of their compact size, ease of use and many built-in peripherals, the 18-pin PIC16F series processors (PIC16F628A, PIC16F88, and now PIC16F1827/47) have always been my favorite microcontrollers. Many of my projects and tutorials written in this blog also use PIC16F628A and PIC16F1827 microcontrollers. As I will be using them more in the future too, I thought of making some PCB versions of my breadboard module for PIC16F628A with some modifications. I used Iteadstudio’s PCB prototyping service for this, and I would say the PCBs turned out really well for the price I paid. I used their 2 layer 5cm x 5cm service and got 10 PCBs for less than $15, including shipping to the United States.

Breadboard module for 18-pin PIC16F microcontrollers - [Link]

25 Dec 2011

[1112.5154] Observation of a new chi_b state in radiative transitions to Upsilon(1S) and Upsilon(2S) at ATLAS – [via]

The chi_b(nP) quarkonium states are produced in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and recorded by the ATLAS detector. Using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.4 fb^-1, these states are reconstructed through their radiative decays to Upsilon(1S,2S) with Upsilon->mu+mu-. In addition to the mass peaks corresponding to the decay modes chi_b(1P,2P)->Upsilon(1S)gamma, a new structure centered at a mass of 10.539+/-0.004 (stat.)+/-0.008 (syst.) GeV is also observed, in both the Upsilon(1S)gamma and Upsilon(2S)gamma decay modes. This is interpreted as the chi_b(3P) system.

New particle indentified at LHC – The Chi-b 3P boson - [Link]

25 Dec 2011

The Comeback of Xerox PARC @ Technology Review – [via]

Last month, a small Norwegian company called Thinfilm Electronics and PARC, the storied Silicon Valley research lab, jointly showed off a technological first—a plastic film that combined both printed transistors and printed digital memory.

Such flexible electronics could be an important component of future products, such as food packaging that senses and record temperatures, shock-sensing helmets, as well as smart toys. But the story of how PARC’s technology—the printed transistors—wound up paired with memory technology from an obscure Norwegian company also provides a window onto a 10-year struggle by Xerox to transform the way it commercializes R&D ideas.

For most of its 40-year history, PARC (for Palo Alto Research Center) was as famous for squandering new technologies as it was for inventing them. The mouse, the graphical user interface, and the drop-down menu were all born at PARC—but it was Apple and Microsoft that commercialized them and made them cornerstone inventions of the PC industry.

The Comeback of Xerox PARC - [Link]

25 Dec 2011

FPGA hardware/software projects were produced by students in the last month of ECE5760 at Cornell. Projects were built using the Altera/Terasic DE2 or DE2-115  FPGA educational boards. This year’s projects include:

  • Prime number generator and RSA encrypter/decrypter
  • Conway’s life tone synthesizer
  • Hand video-tracking virtual piano and drums
  • Finger video-tracking virtual string instrument
  • Hand video-tracking video game

Cornell University ECE 5760 Final Year Projects – [Link]

24 Dec 2011

 

Chris @ PyroElectro.com writes:

Searching for a reliable wireless solution for your project can be a real pain if you’re not familiar with current wireless standards, data rates and reliability. The Xbee Modules that we will use in this article are widely available, use a very reliable wireless transmission protocol and have sufficient datarates for most hobby projects.

This article will show you how to build a basic wireless input and output system in the form of a single transmitter and single receiver. Communication will be one way to keep things simple with two xbee modules being used for the wireless link. In the end, a small trimpot will control the movement of a servo motor.

Xbee Wireless Servo Control - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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