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29 Feb 2012

Sergei Bezrukov writes:

In this project we send and receive digital data by using a 433MHz transmitter and receiver modules TXM-433 and RXM-433 manufactured by LINX. We also use LINX helical whip-style antennas. The following images show the first part of the project – assembling the modules on a PCB and establishing RF connection between them.

Transmitting digital data over RF with LINX modules - [Link]

29 Feb 2012

 

element14 drives Raspberry Pi revolution to educate a new generation of programmers 

Global distribution deal agreed with Raspberry Pi Foundation with orders being accepted immediately

  • Units available to pre-order from 29 February in Europe, US and Asia
  • Raspberry Pi dedicated area on the element14 Community
  • Support materials and PCB tools available free in the Knode on element14 and the Community

LONDON – Feb. 29, 2012 – element14, the first collaborative community and electronics store for design engineers and electronics enthusiasts and a part of global electronics distributor Premier Farnell [LON:PFL], today announced a global distribution deal with the Raspberry Pi Foundation to offer its ground-breaking credit card sized computer. The element14 Community will support the conversations, debate and sharing of knowledge and information from the anticipated flood of enthusiastic developers and first-time programmers keen to get the most  from their Raspberry Pi. Read the rest of this entry »

29 Feb 2012

circuitlab.com writes:

We are happy to announce the release of CircuitLab, a browser-based schematic editor and circuit simulator.

With CircuitLab you can sketch your circuits as easily as you would on a piece of paper, and then simulate your circuit right in your browser to see how it would work in real life! You can then tweak, design, and iterate — all in one tool, all in your web browser.

CircuitLab has powerful SPICE-like device models, and the simulation engine supports mixed-mode analog and digital components side-by-side, so you can rapidly test your ideas for a wide range of possible projects. In addition to DC calculations and time-domain simulation, CircuitLab also has many advanced simulation capabilities, including frequency-domain (small signal) analysis, stepping through circuit parameters, and arbitrary Laplace transform function blocks.

CircuitLab is completely web-based, which not only means itʼs cross-platform (Windows/Mac/Linux) and requires no installation or plug-ins, but also means that all you the circuits you choose to make public can be shared by just copy & pasting a URL!

Instead of the usual forum posts with static screenshots from different desktop tools, the online electronics community can use CircuitLab to share useful URLs (as well as PNGs and PDFs) which link directly to interactive, editable, runnable schematics. In just a few clicks, another hobbyist can open that circuit, make a change, simulate it, and post the new version back to the community.

CircuitLab is now available publicly at https://www.circuitlab.com. Make sure you check out the Quick-Start Circuits for some great examples of what CircuitLab can do!

CircuitLab – browser-based schematic editor and circuit simulator - [Link]

28 Feb 2012

Luca explains how to boot your PC with a Wake on Lan command sent from an Arduino. Setup the WOL feature on your PC, then use the sendWOL() command to send a magic packet via and ENC28J60 ethernet chip: [via]

The wake command is issued sending on the network a specific packet, called Magic Packet. This packet is receved by all the devices connected to local network because it presents – as destination MAC address – the broadcast address (FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF). It includes six bytes valued FF, followed by the target PC’s MAC address repeated 16 times.

Boot your PC with the Arduino using the Wake on Lan command - [Link]


28 Feb 2012

FTDI just released a new series of their USB to serial device ICs. The X-series is an upgrade on the R part used in the Bus Pirate and formerly in Arduinos. It features better transfer rates, lower power consumption, needs fewer discrete components, and has high power USB charging capability. [via]

FTDI is delighted to announce the launch of its new X-Chip series. Made up of 13 devices, with an exception feature set, the X-Chip series offers full speed USB 2.0 bridging solutions to UART, SPI/FT1248, I2C and FIFO interfaces complementing the company’s existing R chip, and Hi-Speed solutions. “By specifying the X-Chip into their designs, engineers will reduce their overall bill of materials and optimise PCB real estate,” states Fred Dart, CEO and founder of FTDI. “With its comprehensive feature set, the benefits of lower power, smaller device footprint and NEW enhanced battery charger detection can all be realised, as well as the robust USB functionality that FTDI has always provided in its connectivity solutions”. In addition to the ICs, FTDI has released a wide-selection of development modules, enabling instant access to the different functions for each chip type, and thus allowing for easy device evaluation and prototyping development.

FTDI’s new X-Series of USB device chips - [Link]

28 Feb 2012

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

Travis Goodspeed has assembled this wardriving project covering the ZigBee wireless protocol. It is designed around the radio module from the TelosB, which is used to sniff for nearby ZigBee/802.15.4 transmissions. This module is connected via serial to a Roving Networks RN42 module which provides a Bluetooth connection to the Nokia N9. Travis’ GoodFET firmware natively supports the TelosB module, and complete instructions for building and flashing onto the module can be found here. He also developed both a command line and GUI client for the Nokia N9 in order to control the TelosB.

Wardriving for ZigBee - [Link]

28 Feb 2012

Replacing electricity with light: First physical ‘metatronic’ circuit created – [via]

The technological world of the 21st century owes a tremendous amount to advances in electrical engineering, specifically, the ability to finely control the flow of electrical charges using increasingly small and complicated circuits. And while those electrical advances continue to race ahead, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania are pushing circuitry forward in a different way, by replacing electricity with light.

Replacing electricity with light: First physical ‘metatronic’ circuit created - [Link]

28 Feb 2012

Pleasant3D is now open source – 3D printing with MakerBot and other hardware [via]. Zaggo writes:

…starting today, I open source the complete code base of Pleasant3D:

https://github.com/zaggo/Pleasant3D

(The slicer plugins of Pleasant3D were open source from the beginning. I’ll mark the old open source BitBucket repository as obsolete.) I’d be very happy, if some of you 3D-printing (or CNC-milling) Mac developers out there would help with the further development of Pleasant3D!

Pleasant3D is now open source - [Link]

28 Feb 2012

StorageBot – voice controlled robotic parts finder. Danh writes – [via]

Hi Adabot and LadyAda, I just completed my StorageBot project for the Instructables ShopBot contest. It uses robotic technologies to help locate parts in bins using a very unique approach. You basically speak to the StorageBot and it “spits out” the parts you are looking for. I used a lot of common parts from the DIY community like stepper motors, a servo, an Arduino compatible processor and 3 meters of the addressable light strip from Adafruit. My favorite part of the project was a 10 minute video demoing the StorageBot but also explaining the significance of why we Makers build things.

StorageBot – voice controlled robotic parts finder - [Link]

28 Feb 2012

We want to show you how to use the popular Arduino to produce a device capable of recognizing passive transponder (TAG). But this is not the usual RFID key, because the system can activate a relay if a recognised TAG is read, but also we took the opportunity to make an application that use cloud-computing. The basic version, which is a simple key relay consists of an Arduino and the RFID shield based on a ID-12 of Innovations: placing a transponder already learned, the relay is activated. The extended version of our project uses an Arduino, the RFID Shield and the Ethernet Shield with which we can access the Internet and stored, using the Google Docs service, the transponder data.

Arduino RFID shield on the Cloud - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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