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2 Apr 2014

LT8301

The LT8301 is a monolithic flyback regulator that significantly simplifies the design of isolated DC/DC converters. By sampling the isolated output voltage directly from the primary-side flyback waveform, the part requires no opto-isolator or third winding for regulation. The LT8301 operates over a 2.7V to 42V input voltage range, has a 1.2A/65V power switch and delivers up to 6 watts of output power, making it well suited for a wide variety of industrial, medical, datacom, military and automotive applications. The LT8301 is available in a small TSOT-23 package. Extended and industrial versions operate over a junction temperature range of -40°C to 125°C. A high temperature automotive grade operates from -40°C to 150°C and a military grade operates from -55°C to 150°C.

LT8301 – 42VIN Micropower No-Opto Isolated Flyback Converter with 65V/1.2A Switch - [Link]

1 Apr 2014

EasyPICtitle

Raj Bhatt from Embedded-Lab has posted a detail review of mikroElektronika’s EasyPIC v7 development board (http://www.newark.com/mikroelektronika/mikroe-798/development-system-easypic-v7/dp/63W4082) on his website. EasyPIC v7 supports over 350 PIC microcontrollers including PIC10F, 12F, 16F, and 18F, and contains an onboard fast USB programmer and real-time debugger. The board also features two mikroBUS sockets for tons of other add-on boards, thus expanding its capabilities.

[via the contact form]

Review of EasyPIC v7 - [Link]

1 Apr 2014

FPNQ4FWHRWNEBSZ.MEDIUM

ajoyraman @ instructables.com writes:

PC sound cards form a readily available Signal Generator for testing electronic circuits. The utility of these signal generators is limited because the outputs are AC coupled and limited to ±2V.

Taking advantage of the two channels provided by the sound card this Instructable shows a scheme which uses one channel to output the Sin/Square/Triangle waveform with a fixed gain, while setting up a 441 Hz PWM square wave on the second channel. This PWM waveform is converted to ±8V averaged and summed with the first channel to provide a DC offset controllable by the duty-cycle setting.

PC Sound Card Signal Generator Interface - [Link]

1 Apr 2014

F0YJW0THGH6XIA9.MEDIUM

bgyroscope @ www.instructables.com writes:

This instructable will show you how to build your own stopwatch to record multiple splits using an ATmega328 programmable microcontroller. When one presses the start button (or slaps the metal band in my watch), the screen displays the last lap for a second then continues the time on the next lap. It’s great for all you runners out there doing an interval workout.

Lap Stopwatch with ATmega328 Microcontroller - [Link]


1 Apr 2014

AVR

Evilthingamabober @ instructables.com writes:

Microcontrollers are, without a doubt, amazing little things. They are versatile, powerful, and extremely tiny. Unfortunately, the latter trait is also shared by both my wallet and my programming skills. My understanding of C is poor, and I can hardly afford to buy something like an Arduino or a decent ISP. And in any case, the Arduino would be overkill for many of my projects, which only need simple IC’s.

But as many of you know, DIY always finds a way. This tutorial is meant for those among us with no budgets or programming experience who want to start using these little machines. It is not based around the ATmega328 (the Arduino Uno chip), but rather the Attiny line of chips (the Atiny85 and Attiny2313, to be specific). The total cost of this project can go as lower than $15 if you know where to buy from, and you can still use the original Arduino IDE and language to program your projects in the end. Keep in mind that you will need some soldering skills to get this project done.

The Idiot’s Guide to Programming AVR’s on the Cheap - [Link]

31 Mar 2014

SerialMonitor

ARPix has posted this instructable on constructing an external serial monitor device using the Atmega328 MCU and a graphic LCD. It allows a user interface to set the serial baud rate and start/stop functions using tact switches.

Sometimes I needed an external serial monitor like the Serial Monitor in the Arduino Editor, to see what is going on. So I made one. For the ESM I used an Atmel Atmega328 because it have an internal SRAM with 2KBytes. It’s necessary for the big data processing. So you need more than 1KByte SRAM.

[via]

Constructing an external serial monitor - [Link]

31 Mar 2014

v3barofinished

This is a 1-wire absolute pressure sensor based around the Motorola MPX4115A:

The 1-wire weather group is always looking for new sensors and ideas that will allow them to monitor more and more elements, the 1-wire barometer is just one of these sensors. Based around the Motorola MPX4115A absolute pressure sensor, the group has been trying to design / decide on a good interface circuit for quite a long time.

The most commonly used and my personal preference is the Bray series. Both the version 1,2 and 3 designs use the same amplifier with adjustable offset and gain presets, the main difference between the three versions is that the second two versions have dual voltages, 5v and 10v with the amplifier being powered from the 10v rail, this way the amplifier has a greater output range which uses the full input range of the DS2438 ADC, subsequently giving better resolution capabilities.

1-Wire Barometer Project - [Link]

31 Mar 2014

dsc08431

Lee Zhi Xian writes:

I often use Arduino to test out my project prototype before complete it. Sometimes, I wanted to test more than one project at the same time. I would need more Arduino, but the original Arduino is over my budget for prototyping purpose. Therefore, I decided to make my own Arduino. Some of the benefits of making your Arduino (at least for me) are it is cheap, easy, learn to design PCB and electronics at the same time. Although there are a lot of guides on how to make your own Arduino, I decided to make one so as I can share with my readers, and at the same time document it for myself.

Build your own Arduino Uno - [Link]

31 Mar 2014

pcb

The accelerometer can measure acceleration in two axis using Analog Devices ADXL202. +-2g can be measured in each axis.

The accelerometer can measure acceleration and time. Using the time and the acceleration it can calculate and display:Time (s)

  • Average acceleration (m/s2)
  • Instantanous acceleration (min/max) (m/s2)
  • Speed (m/s & km/h)
  • Distance (m & km)

The mass of the object can also be input, the accelerometer can then also display:Instantenous Force (N)

  • Average Force (N)
  • Instantenous Power (kW and HP) * .

Bullit Accelerometer – Accelerometer with microcontroller and display - [Link]

 

31 Mar 2014

FMF2YMDHS3GUGBB.MEDIUM

This project was originally released on www.robives.com

Resistors use coloured bands to show their value. There are usually four bands, the first two code for the first two digits of the resistors value, the third is the multiplier, basically the number of zeroes on the end of the number. The final band shows the tolerance of the resistor, how accurate it is.

This color wheel helps you decode the bands on standard resistor so you can see what value they are .

Resistor Color Wheel - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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