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6 Nov 2014

15479712470_6f98be9525_z

Ioannis Kedros @ embeddedday.com:

Why this long intro? Well, I am an engineer, a maker in general, that wants to build stuffs. And the swags above came in a nice cardboard tube. A very strong, thick, with a nice light plastic type coating (helping with the moisture during shipping).

This makes a good indoor enclosure, but with proper treatment will be a nice fit for an outdoor enclosure as well. I am going to put a Raspberry Pi inside it together with a camera and some sensors for reading environmental variables.

The RPi is the Model B and has some connectors around it that I am not going to use. Those are taking space and placing the Pi slightly offset of what I want. I decided to remove them and use some of those in future projects. Nothing is going to the trash bin! Anyway, I am not going to use this Pi to somewhere else. The project will be placed permanently in my “lab” and I will do only software improvements.

Project Tube - [Link]

6 Nov 2014

charger detector figures 3 RGBx600

by Mohamed Ismail @ edn.com:

Other than generous helpings of coffee, what helps industry decrease time to market, drive down cost, and focus more of the design cycle on innovation? Hint: standardization. By defining protocols and operating characteristics, standards have impacted all aspects of technology: device package sizes, pin outs, data and communication interfaces, software drivers, connectors, ESD ratings, environmental compliance, test fixtures. The list goes on and on. The more detailed a specification, the better equipped are developers for defining products that serve the marketplace. If there is any doubt about the value of tightly defined standards, go into any two clothing stores and buy the same size shirt.

USB battery charging rev. 1.2: Important role of charger detectors - [Link]

6 Nov 2014

NewImage242

New solar power material converts 90 percent of captured light into heat via phys.org

A multidisciplinary engineering team at the University of California, San Diego developed a new nanoparticle-based material for concentrating solar power plants designed to absorb and convert to heat more than 90 percent of the sunlight it captures. The new material can also withstand temperatures greater than 700 degrees Celsius and survive many years outdoors in spite of exposure to air and humidity. Their work, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s SunShot program, was published recently in two separate articles in the journal Nano Energy.

New solar power material converts 90 percent of captured light into heat - [Link]

6 Nov 2014

microcontrollers_IMG_5471

Make your Arduino walk and chew gum at the same time.

Once you have mastered the basic blinking leds, simple sensors and sweeping servos, it’s time to move on to bigger and better projects. That usually involves combining bits and pieces of simpler sketches and trying to make them work together. The first thing you will discover is that some of those sketches that ran perfectly by themselves, just don’t play well with others.

The Arduino is a very simple processor with no operating system and can only run one program at a time. Unlike your personal computer or a Raspberry Pi, the Arduino has no way to load and run multiple programs.

That doesn’t mean that we can’t manage multiple tasks on an Arduino. We just need to use a different approach. Since there is no operating system to help us out, We have to take matters into our own hands.

Multi-tasking the Arduino - [Link]


6 Nov 2014

new controller

by jptds.blogspot.co.uk:

It’s not often that I finish the various small projects I undertake. Tesla coils, mass spectrometers, automated tomato plant watering systems, homebrew heaters have all been conceived and sometimes parts bought and assembled with some even making it as far as working. This project however made it all the way to finished.

Bike Light Controller Re-Design - [Link]

5 Nov 2014

rcj_wireless_world-record_40Gbps.jpg-(1)

LTE beat by 40X by a new protocol described this week at the Compound Semiconductor Integrated Circuits Symposium in San Diego. Next their aim is wireless 100 Gbit WLAN: R. Colin Johnson @NextGenLog

World’s Wireless Record Breaks 40 Gbit/s - [Link]

5 Nov 2014

dtx2-4100c_large_1

by dimitech.com:

Microkite is a DTX module built to utilise the great potential of the new PIC32MX1xx/2xx microcontrollers. It integrates a power supply able to provide power to the external user circuit as well, a microSD connector for data storage and a USB-UART bridge for easy communication with a PC terminal.

The module is intended for inclusion in various control systems and follows the DTX standard pinout which opens the possibility for a trouble-free upgrade with newer models in future. The module fits into a standard PLCC-68 socket and significantly optimises the end user circuit and the later software development process.

Microkite DTX module - [Link]

5 Nov 2014

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by mikelllc @ instructables.com:

This project describes the design of a very low budget 3D Printer that is mainly built out of recycled electronic components. The result is a small format printer for less than 100$.

First of all, we learn how a generic CNC system works (by assembling and calibrating bearings, guides and threads) and then teach the machine to respond to g-code instructions. After that, we add a small plastic extruder and give an overview on plastic extrusion calibration, driver power tuning and other few operations that will bring the printer to live. Following this instructions you will get a small footprint 3D Printer that is built with about an 80% of recycled components, which gives it a great potential and helps to reduce the cost significantly.

EWaste 60$ 3DPrinter - [Link]

5 Nov 2014

CS

by Michael Dunn @ edn.com:

Well, the “Test PCB” project is finally underway. In case you don’t remember my original blog, the idea is to send a PCB design out to a half-dozen or so low-cost PCB prototype shops, then review their service and quality.

I’ve created a 6 × 6cm double-sided design for this project. I would have made it larger, but at least one fab’s prices (I’m looking at you, OSH Park) rise steeply with board size, and I wanted to keep within budget.

Quick-Turn PCB shop review project: Step 1, the PCB - [Link]

5 Nov 2014

DI5464f1

by R O Ocaya @ edn.com:

This Design Idea shows a way to drive low-power electronic circuits using a single 1.5V cell. The design is based on a free-running oscillator that drives a flyback transformer to generate a controllable higher voltage. It can be used to power analog circuitry, microcontrollers, and any other light loads.

Flyback switcher works down to 1.1V, flashes HBLEDs - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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