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27 Jan 2015

obr1651_uvod

If you´re deciding whether it´s worth to use a backup battery, we bring you a few remarks why to go for it or not.

Lithium battery Xeno Energy with a lifetime of over 10 years and rules for their usage were brought to you in our article „10 years of operation for 1 battery?”. They´re usable as a “main” power source for low power consumption devices and the second main field of their usage is a power supply backup. In contrast to the smallest cells used for PC memories backup (BIOS) for example, the types, which we keep in stock feature capacity of several Ah and they´re also able to provide a relatively decent current. That enables to use such battery also for a real operation of the device (MCU) during the power supply dropout.

Probably the main reason why not to use a backup battery is a doubt about higher production costs of a given device. However, when we look at the sales price in our e-shop, we find, that common PCB types like for example XL-050F AX (LS14250CNA) or XL-060F AX (LS14500CNA) are available for the price of max. 4 Eur/pce. At the same time, using this type of batteries eliminates the need for a battery holder, charging chip, etc.

The newest contribution on the field of PCB lithium batteries in our stock is the type XL-210F/STD 5,5mm, what´s the disc with 33mm diameter and only 6.6mm height, with leads to be soldered to PCB (THT). Low profile enables usage even in slim devices and everywhere, where common cylinder types are not suitable.

Further information will provide you the Xeno short form catalogue as well as detailed datasheets of Xeno batteries. In the Xeno production portfolio can also be found special batteries with a higher pulse capacity and type for extra high temperatures -55 to +130°C.


Backup battery soldered directly to a PCB? - [Link]

27 Jan 2015

F7YN572I5BN8B9W.MEDIUM

by micahmelnyk @ instructables.com:

In short: I developed a portable, battery powered device that sounds an alarm when your bag or purse is moved. Once armed, can only be turned off by your secret code.

The device is built off an Arduino compatible Trinket Pro, using an off-the-shelf project box with PCB.

Bag movement alarm for theft prevention - [Link]

27 Jan 2015

FLA4E8II5BS9NUA.MEDIUM

by TinyCircuits @ instructables.com:

In this Instructable, we will be building a compass using the TinyShield Compass as well as the Circle Edge Led shield.

After getting your boards and battery, the Arduino IDE will be the first thing to download if you have not done so already. When the IDE has been loaded go to tools, board, and select Arduino Pro or Pro Mini (3.3V, 8MHz) w/ ATmega328.

TinyCompass - [Link]

27 Jan 2015

gpsclockv1-1final_0022

Kevin Rye’s GPS clock project :

I’ve been working on this clock for a long time, and a lot of effort has been put into it. I’ve learned so much from this project. I do have to admit some parts of the code aren’t as elegant as they should be, but it works. With the code complete, all that’s left to do is try my hand at designing a 3D printed joystick for the 5-way switch.

GPS Clock Assembly - [Link]


26 Jan 2015

germanium-tin-laser-2

by Colin Jeffrey @ gizmag.com:

Swiss scientists have created the first semiconductor laser consisting solely of elements of main group IV (the carbon group) on the periodic table. Simply, this means that the new device is directly compatible with other elements in that group – such as silicon, carbon, and lead – and so can be directly incorporated in a silicon chip as it is manufactured. This presents new possibilities for transmitting data around computer chips using light, which could result in potential transfer speeds exponentially faster than possible with copper wire and using only a fraction of the energy of today’s integrated circuits.

First germanium-tin semiconductor laser directly compatible with silicon chips - [Link]

26 Jan 2015

DAC-Internal-Block-Diagram

Shawon M. Shahryiar @ embedded-lab.com writes:

In embedded systems, oftentimes it is needed to generate analog outputs from a microcontroller. Examples of such include, generating audio tones, voice, music, smooth continuous waveforms, function generators, voltage reference generators, etc. Traditionally in such cases the most common techniques applied are based on Pulse Width Modulation (PWM), resistor networks and external Digital-to-Analog Converter (DAC) chips like MCP4921. The aforementioned techniques have different individual limitations and moreover require external hardware interfacing, adding complexities and extra cost to projects. XMega micros are equipped with 12 bit fast DACs apart from PWM blocks and again it proves itself to be a very versatile family of microcontrollers. In this post we will have a look into this block.

XMega DAC - [Link]

26 Jan 2015

ISL8203M

by elektor.com:

Intersil have introduced a single chip just 9 x 6.5 mm which contains just about all the control features (including the output stages) needed to build a dual 0.8 to 5 V power supply with 3 A per channel output capability. The ISL8203M can also supply 6 A in current sharing operation.

The ISL8203M is an integrated step-down power module optimized for generating low output voltages down to 0.8V. The input supply voltage range spans from 2.85 V to 6 V. The two channels are clocked 180° out-of-phase to help reduce input RMS current and EMI. While in current sharing mode this interleaving of the two channels is beneficial for reducing input and output voltage ripple.

Dual 3A PSU on a Chip - [Link]

26 Jan 2015

an_nxp_an11119

App note(PDF) from NXP on DC-DC medium power small-signal MOSFETs.

This application note explores different methods of DC-to-DC conversion. It includes some examples of DC-to-DC down-converters using small-signal MOSFETs.

App note: Medium power small-signal MOSFETs in DC-to-DC conversion - [Link]

26 Jan 2015

by SparkFun Electronics @ youtube.com:

In today’s episode of “According to Pete,” SparkFun Director of Engineering Pete Dokter is taking a look at homelighting solutions and the SparkFun FemtoBuck LED Driver

SparkFun According to Pete #40: LED Home Lighting and the FemtoBuck Driver - [Link]

26 Jan 2015

by mjlorton @ youtube.com

In this video I explain how a spectrum analyser (Tektronix MDO3000) can be used to view signals in the frequency domain vs an oscilloscope’s time domain.
I give an overview of the logarithmic scale and its benefits vs a linear scale.
I explain how compound wave forms like square and triangle are made up of harmonics.
I do a practical demonstration of how the spectrum analyser works with some example signals. I then show how this can also be done on an oscilloscope using the FFT (fast Fourier transform) maths function.

Spectrum Analyzer, Scope and FFT looking at Signals - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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