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28 May 2014
With a gap of just 90 nanometer on its giant magnetoresistance (GNR) read head IBM has set a new record fitting 154 terabytes on a single cartridge

With a gap of just 90 nanometer on its giant magnetoresistance (GNR) read head IBM has set a new record fitting 154 terabytes on a single cartridge

Mag tape might be old school, but its the only memory technology for Big Data that is keeping up with Moores Law: R. Colin Johnson @NextGenLog

IBM Sets New World Record with Mag Tape - [Link]

28 May 2014
Interferometric TFT image

Interferometric TFT printed above an oxide covered (blue) metallization layer of a CMOS chip.

Stacking memory is just most obvious application of this ultra-cheap method of stacking 3D circuitry within the metallization layers of standard CMOS chips, but I’m sure that when designers put on their thinking cap they’ll find many more useful applications.: R. Colin Johnson @NextGenLog

Chips On-the-Cheap Funded by SRC – [Link]

28 May 2014

hex-keypad-arduino

Interfacing hex keypad to arduino @ circuitstoday.com

This article is about how to interface a hex keypad to arduino. Hex keypad is a very important component in embedded systems and the typical applications are code locks, calculators, automation systems or simply any thing that requires a character or numeric input. This project will display the pressed key in the serial monitor window of the arduino IDE. The same project can be modified to display the pressed key on 7-segment LED display or an LCD display. Before going into the details, have a look at the hex keypad.

Interfacing hex keypad to arduino - [Link]

28 May 2014

20140524040433-IMG_7677

Dynamic Near Field Communication tag, a new wireless technology that connects phones with MCU after wifi and Bluetooth, is your optimized NFC solution.

We are proud to bring about the Dynamic Near Field Communication tag (DNFC tag), an invention that who especially tech nerds and DIY lovers have been expected for long. It greatly outstands among traditional read-only NFC tags because it’s readable and rewritable and it can communicate with various platforms, to name several most popular: Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Leaf Maple stm32 and some more. It owns a high level of dexterity, thus making it efficient, easy to execute and user-friendly.

The clue is in the name: Near Field Communication. It allows NFC portable devices to establish peer-to-peer radio communications, delivering data from one to another by touching them or putting them very close together. Basically, when you get your phone (if it has NFC as a feature) close to something equipped with NFC – like a tag – it invokes an action on your device.

DNFC Tag: the Pre-Eminent NFC Tag that Interacts with MCU - [Link]


28 May 2014

rt_solder_station_photo_web

by martin-kumm.de:

This page provides documents about a cheap SMD solder station built as an Arduino shield (Arduino UNO). It supports active soldering tips from Weller (RT series) which contain the heating element as well as a sensor and provides a standard 3.5 mm jack. Together with the corresponding female connector you will get a compact SMD soldering iron (see pictures below) with very fast heat up times of a few seconds.

SMD Soldering Station for Weller Soldering Tips - [Link]

27 May 2014

ti-tl431

by Ken Shirriff:

A die photo of the interesting but little-known TL431 power supply IC provides an opportunity to explore how analog circuits are implemented in silicon. While the circuit below may look like a maze, the chip is actually relatively simple and can be reverse-engineered with a bit of examination. This article explains how transistors, resistors, and other components are implemented in silicon to form the chip below.

The TL431 is a “programmable precision reference”[1] and is commonly used in switching power supplies, where it provides feedback indicating if the output voltage is too high or too low. By using a special circuit called a bandgap, the TL431 provides a stable voltage reference across a wide temperature range. The block diagram of the TL431 below shows that it has a 2.5 volt reference and a comparator[1], but looking at the die shows that internally it is quite different from the block diagram.

Reverse-engineering the TL431 - [Link]

27 May 2014

Hobby grade R/C cars with high voltage batteries require some form of voltage regulation.  The batteries in those vehicles are typically 11.1V to 22.2V, while the required voltage for the radio system components is 6.0V to 7.4V depending on their ratings. Current draw with some of these systems normally ranges from 3A to 6A, as well.  Some electronic speed controls in the R/C industry have this capability, but many do not, and it is a common point of failure for those that do.

This circuit provides the necessary regulation and power supply for high powered R/C systems common today.  The center of the circuit is the RT8298, a synchronous high voltage Buck Converter that can support the input voltage range from 4.5V to 24V and the output current can be up to 6A.  The voltage dividers that set the output voltage to 6V or 7.4V are controlled by a simple switch that the user sets to the voltage they want.

R/C Car Voltage Regulator – [Link]

27 May 2014

Voltset connects to smart devices and turns them into smart multimeters, allowing you to tinker, learn and collaborate with electronics.

Voltset is a module that plugs into a smartphone via a USB connection. It will then turn a smartphone into a smart multimeter. The multimeter is a must have tool for every DIY, tinkerer or hardware hacker. This project was started two years ago by two makers, Michael and Tom. They could not find a multimeter that was convenient to carry, yet powerful and versatile enough to be useful in their wide range of projects. So they set out to build their own. Almost two years later, they are ready to introduce Voltset to the world of makers.

Voltset – World’s Smartest Multimeter for Smart Devices - [Link]

27 May 2014

IMG_6697

by Tony Keith:

You have a project that accepts commands using a 16 button keypad and want to perform validation on the commands as each character is typed. But how? Use state machine logic / programming to solve the problem. If you aren’t familiar with or haven’t used state machine logic in programming, it is the easiest way to to break complex problems into manageable states and state transitions especially for handling serial input. One of the easiest ways to implement a state machine is to use a switch statement. In my opinion it is the only way to implement serial input commands.

Keypad Input Validation using State Machine Programming - [Link]

26 May 2014

non_contact_voltage_test_pen_7981

by hackedgadgets.com:

If you are doing any electrical work, one of these Non Contact Voltage Test Pens can be quite handy. Just touch the wire that you want to make sure isn’t live and check that the tester doesn’t beep and start flashing. This test pen is on all the time monitoring for AC between 90V and 1000 V. I would have preferred the device to have an on/off switch which would allow the battery to last even longer but I guess they figured that the 1.5 year life that they rate this for when in standby was good enough. This impressive life is because they got the current draw down to under 10 micro amps! Even when operating it only draws a handful of milli amps.

Non Contact Voltage Test Pen Teardown - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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