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9 May 2014

legion

Organic LED, microprocessor controlled, intelligent energy source for all of your electronic devices.

Legion is a portable energy source with a built-in Organic LED display coupled with a microprocessor. It can charge any USB powered electronic devices. Unlike a traditional portable battery where you’re left in the dark about the state of charge of your battery, Legion learns how you use your electronic devices and displays precisely how much more time (day:hours:minutes) you have remaining until you run out of power. Legion uses premium grade Lithium Polymer batteries designed to maximize your energy density while packing it into the smallest area possible. Legion is proudly designed in Silicon Valley, California.

[via]

LeGion Halves Phone Charge Times - [Link]

9 May 2014

GU9O7pz-600x450

Scasagrande shared his USB isolator project, that is available at Github:

I received inspiration for the project from other USB isolator projects on the internet. Mine features a few improvements to many of them:
USB-B and micro-USB connectors on the host (upstream) side
In addition to accepting power via the barrel connector (which goes through a basic 7805 low dropout linear regulator), there is also a micro-USB port for device-side power. This allows you to use the now common cell phone charger cube to power your isolated device
Push-button switch for easy USB disconnection events
Bypass jumper for linear regulator, allowing for 5V power from the barrel connector
Encased in a small box to protect the IC from the world

[via]

USB isolator project - [Link]

8 May 2014

WatchDuino is an open hardware project that combines inexpensive electronic components and a complex Arduino (C++) code to build a useful and reprogrammable smart watch.

The code and the components have been optimized after a lot of prototypes to provide a rich set of features with a small and cheap battery that can last more than a week without recharging. A lot of electronic and software engineering was required to make this project possible.

WatchDuino – Arduino watch - [Link]

8 May 2014

nanite-pic1

Possibly the smallestest ATtiny85 based ‘duino derivative.

Recently, Olimex anncounced the Olimexino 85s, claimed to be the “World’s smallest Arduino ever“. Now, that looks like a challenge. I guess it is about time to show off what has been on my desk since some time last year: The Nanite, pictured below.

I designed this board for fun after the Digispark and, subsequentally, the Adafruit Trinket were announced. The motivation was to have my own ATtiny85 based development board based on a USB bootloader and optimized for the ubiquitous 170 point mini-breadboards. In contrast to the Digispark it even sports a reset button. However, it lacks an integrated voltage converter as it is supposed to be powered by USB.

The Smallest ATtiny85 Based USB Board - [Link]


8 May 2014

rememf1

by Michael Dunn:

Sometimes, we forget the implications of Moore’s Law, and just how amazing our IC technology is compared to yesteryear’s. Pack-rat that I am, it’s no trouble for me to peruse what used to pass for high-tech – and now, you can have a look at it too!

IC packages used to be prettier, I think. Lots more gold and white ceramic happening. Packages that look as though they could go to outer space without breaking a sweat.

Remembrance of chips past - [Link]

8 May 2014

smps_in_space_fig1

by Rajan Bedi:

Today’s spacecraft subsystems require an increasing number of power rails and supply distributions with loads ranging from milliamps to tens of amps. It is important to choose the appropriate solution to meet the performance and reliability requirements for the target mission.

Switched-mode power supplies (SMPS) use energy storage elements such as inductors, capacitors or transformers to transfer energy from the input to the output at periodic intervals. In a SMPS, transistors are operated in their low-dissipative switching states instead of active mode as used by a linear regulator. When a transistor is on and conducting, the voltage drop across its power path is minimal, and when it is off, there is almost no current through the power path.

Switch-mode regulators for space applications - [Link]

8 May 2014

oswatch-2

This watch, by Jonathan Cook, recently won MAKE’s Arduino Challenge, as posted on Bits and Pieces from the Embedded Design World. [via]

The watch is the latest iteration of an ongoing BLE watch endeavor Cook has been exploring for the past nine months. In addition to time and date functionality, he’s building interfacing that any smartwatch wearer would want — email, Facebook notification, Twitter updates, etc., and hopes to have the community further the platform as well.

Atmel-based smartwatch wins Make challenge - [Link]

8 May 2014

IMG_0242

pcDuino3 is a high performance, cost effective single board computer. It runs operation systems such as Ubuntu Linux and Android. pcDuino3 has HDMI interface to output its graphic desktop screen. It could support multi-format 1080p 60fps video decoder and 1080p 30fps H.264 and MPEG4 video encoder with its built-in hardware video processing engine. It targets specially the fast growing demands from the open source community. pcDuino3 provides easy-to-use tool chains and is compatible with the popular Arduino ecosystem such as Arduino Shields.

pcDuino3 – High performance, cost effective single board computer - [Link]

8 May 2014

Img_DigitalTimerFinished2

Raj @ embedded-lab.com build a programmable digital timer. He writes:

Digital timer switches are used to control the operation of electrical devices based on a programmed schedule. This project describes a programmable digital timer based on the PIC16F628A microcontroller that can be programmed to schedule the on and off operation of an electrical appliance. The appliance is controlled through a relay switch. This timer switch allows you to set both on and off time. That means, you can program when do you want to turn the device on and for how long you want it to be remained on. The maximum time interval that you can set for on and off operation is 99 hours and 59 minutes. The project provides an interactive user interface using a 16×2 character LCD along with 4 push buttons.

Programmable digital timer switch using a PIC Microcontroller - [Link]

8 May 2014

1-wire_board

by Kalle Hyvönen:

I’ve been thinking about making a temperature logger for my room and my computer, I set on using DS18S20 sensors from Maxim because they’re common, cheap and overally pretty ideal. My computer is so new that it does not have a serial port (not 100% sure, I think there might be a pinheader on the motherboard with serial port connections) so I have to use USB for interfacing. Next thing I had to do was to make an USB to 1-wire adapter so I could attach the sensors to my computer.

I browsed around for a while and set on using the DS2490 USB-to-1-wire adapter chip because the circuit for it looked pretty simple. I modded the component values a bit from the ones on the original schematic from Maxim to ones I had in hand. I used 0805 sized SMD components because I have those in store.

USB-to-1-wire Adapter - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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