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11 Jun 2014

mjlorton @ youtube.com writes: In this video I go through the components that are part of a solar power solution. I explain the differences between On-grid vs. off grid.

How to Solar Power Your Home / House #1 – On Grid vs Off Grid - [Link]

11 Jun 2014

14208300644_826ec4f48a_z

Juan Ignacio Cerrudo @ ssihla.wordpress.com writes:

The design is based on some of the various diy electronics loads out there (like the one from Dave Jones). The mosfet is a P45N03LT , most likely I took it from some of the PC power supply I’ve “recycled”. I’m using two 25k potentiometers, one for coarse adjustment and the other for fine adjustment (10 turn pots are kind of expensive…). The control voltage varies between 0 and 5 volts and is divided by two with a couple of 10k resistors. The op-amp is an OPA2336, It has rail to rail output so the load can sink roughly up to 2,5. The op amp is powered with a 7805.

Constant Current Electronic Load - [Link]

11 Jun 2014

Dave grabs a few junkbox parts and builds a useful constant current load for switch mode power supply, battery testing, and other applications.

EEVblog #102 – DIY Constant Current Dummy Load for Power Supply and Battery Testing - [Link]

11 Jun 2014

DI5459sch

by Benabadji Noureddine:

This Design Idea demonstrates a new method of driving six LEDs with only two I/O lines from a microcontroller, and so is particularly suitable for any pin-limited chip. It uses a pair of I/O lines combined with a pair of complementary bipolar transistors. More than one LED can appear to be lit by multiplexing.

Two PIC pins drive six LEDs - [Link]


11 Jun 2014

Portable_USB_Charger_Teardown_7998-500x436

Alan Parekh @ hackedgadgets.com writes:

This video was going to be a repair of this Portable USB Charger but as it turns out there wasn’t anything electrically wrong with it. It didn’t work out of the box but I think that must have been caused by some oxidation on the USB contacts. It seems to work like a champ now. The control chip for the DC/DC converter looks to be this DHMF chip. I have never seen the swoop logo before and can’t seem to find any data on this 5 pin device though. It is probably similar to the LT1302 (PDF) that the Adafruit MintyBoost uses. The efficiency of this circuit doesn’t appear to be as efficient as a proper one built using the LT1302 though since when drawing 500mA from the output it can maintain very close to 5 volts out (2.5 watts) but needs an input of 3 volt at 1.3 amps to do it (3.9 watts). This gives us an efficiency of about 64%, the graph from the datasheet of the LT1302 indicates that it could perform at about 86% under these conditions.

Portable USB Charger Teardown - [Link]

11 Jun 2014

PK @ dqydj.net writes:

Let me set this up for you: most 8-bit AVRs in the wild (I happened to use an Arduino Nano for this project) are running at 16 MHz. That’s 16,000,000 calculations per second… a very respectable number for most embedded applications.

The VGA industry standard, which is pretty much the default case “we-can-always-fallback-to-this” video standard (640 pixels wide by 480 pixels tall by 60 frames per second), requires pixels to be clocked out at 25.175 MHz:

25,175,000 > 16,000,000.

And that was just one of the barriers to pulling off this silly project. And, yes, with the hack I told you about last time (Please see my notes below), more is possible without overclocking the Arduino – roughly 800 or so pixels wide in 4 bit color should be doable with a 16MHz part, and, probably 1024 pixels in 4 bit color are in reach for 20 MHz clocked parts. (If you’re willing to drop to 2 or 1 bit color and spend a ton on ICs that can handle even faster clocks, you can hit HD resolutions – but I think you’ll run into financial constraints before you max out on the technical side)

How to Produce 640×480 Color VGA Video From an 8-Bit Arduino - [Link]

10 Jun 2014

Timer(1)

by diyfan.blogspot.gr:

This is a quick project for a timer. Recently I finished my UV light exposure box and thought that it will be convenient to have a build in timer to switch off the light after preset time.

Simple timer with PIC16F628A - [Link]

10 Jun 2014

in-use

By Sean Michael Ragan:

The Joule Thief (Wikipedia) is a well-known “instant gratification” hobby circuit that uses just a handful of components to pull off a pretty impressive parlor trick — using a single 1.5V battery, the Joule Thief can light a high-voltage blue or white LED that normally requires 3.5V or greater to turn on. Even more impressive, it can do so using a battery that is so drained of energy as to be counted “dead” for almost all other purposes. I have not measured this value myself, but it is commonly claimed that a Joule Thief can light a white LED from a battery with an open-circuit voltage as low as 0.6.

Bring “dead” batteries back to life with a toroid and the Joule Thief circuit. - [Link]

10 Jun 2014

motor-speed-control-arduino

praveen @ circuitstoday.com writes:

PWM or pulse width modulation is a very common method used for controlling the power across devices like motor, light etc. In PWM method the power across the load is controlled by varying the duty cycle of the drive signal. More the duty cycle more power is delivered across the load and less the duty cycle, less power is delivered across the load. A hex keypad is used for controlling the speed. The speed can be varied in seven steps using the hex keypad. Arduino UNO is the type os arduino development board used in this circuit. The circuit diagram of the PWM motor speed control using arduino is shown in the figure below.

PWM motor speed control using Arduino - [Link]

10 Jun 2014

Add a video monitor to your arduino via serial !! You can use it as your prefered output or as a secondary screen for the results of your sketch.

All you send through the serial will be printed out on your TV screen. (You can use an old TV).

On Arduino, you must connect TX from arduino to RX (blue borne) of this my rig adapter. Or on a PC, you can connect direct via USB cable.

Add a video monitor to your Arduino using USB Serial TTL to RCA TV input - [Link]

 



 
 
 

 

 

 

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