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19 Aug 2014

LT3061

by elektor.com:

To add to its growing family of voltage regulator solutions Linear Technology Corporation have announced the LT3061, a high-voltage, low-noise, low-dropout voltage linear regulator with active output discharge. The device can deliver up to 100 mA of continuous output current with a 250 mV dropout voltage at full load. The LT3061 features an NMOS pull-down that discharges the output when SHDN or IN is driven low. This rapid output discharge is useful for applications requiring power conditioning on both start-up and shutdown (e.g. high-end imaging sensors).

A single external capacitor provides programmable low noise reference performance and output soft-start functionality. The LT3061 has a quiescent current of 45μA and provides fast transient response with a minimum 3.3μF output capacitor. In shutdown the quiescent current is less than 3μA and the reference soft-start capacitor is reset.

A High Voltage LDO regulator - [Link]

19 Aug 2014

OpenHardwareExG

OpenHardwareExG, An open source platform for ECG, EEG, EMG, ENG, and EOG signal processing:

The OpenHardwareExG is a platform for ECG, EEG, EMG, ENG, EOG, and evoked potential applications.

The OpenHardwareExG platform was originally developed as part of the eeg-mouse project.

Project goals
The main goal of the project is to build a device that allows the creation of electrophysiologic signal processing applications. In addition:
Hardware and software that we develop will have a free/open source license. We also prefer to use hardware and software that are free/open source.
We would like to keep the hardware DIY compatible (hand solderable, with parts that are readily available in small quantities, etc.)
For us, this is a hobby and learning project. It’s important to keep it fun, and take the time to learn along the way.

[via]

OpenHardwareExG: An open source platform for ECG, EEG, EMG, ENG, and EOG signal processing - [Link]

19 Aug 2014

gps-navigation-system-based-on-Auduino

Built on the basis of Arduino UNO, GPS, SD card, TFT, GPS map navigation system is to obtain the real-time position information via GPS, to send it to UNO for calculation, according to the calculating results, and teamed up with the

map file stored in SD card, thus presenting the position on TFT. The GPS system, owing the function to store the current position information, can be applied to running positioning and to record the running tracing.

Arduino GPS Map Navigation System - [Link]

18 Aug 2014

FKFEX3VHYY8JT5F

tanishqjain340 wrote this instructable detailing the build of his analog calculator project:

Do simple calculations with your math box.
The next time you need to crunch a couple of numbers, resist the urge to grab a digital calculator. Instead, round up some variable resistors, also known as potentiometers, and wire them into an analog mathematics rig. By twisting the potentiometers’ knobs and measuring the resulting voltage or resistance with a digital multimeter, you can perform simple multiplication and addition without a microprocessor in sight.

[via]

Go analog with a resistance-based calculator - [Link]


18 Aug 2014

RPiCam1

by elektor.com:

When you think Raspberry Pi and camera you probably already know the score; a small camera board that plugs into the Pi’s CSI connector fitted with a fixed-focus wide-angle lens. This versatile setup has been the basis of all sorts of homebrew applications. The SnapPiCam takes the Pi down a different route and converts it into a 5 MP digital camera with interchangeable lens.

Gregory L Holloway is the brains behind this idea, he developed it as an entry into an Instructables competition (which he won) and the response he got encouraged him to launch it on Kickstarter. The design uses the lower spec RPi A without an Ethernet port and with 256 MB of RAM. The camera includes a LiPo battery and DC-DC converter to make it truly portable and different versions allow you to add a rear touchscreen and various interchangeable, magnetic-mount lens ranging from wide-angle to telephoto zoom.

SnapPiCam, a DIY Digital Camera - [Link]

18 Aug 2014

This video describes how a classic double-balanced diode-ring mixer operates. Very basic mixer theory is quickly reviewed, which describes how the sum and difference of the LO (local oscillator) and RF (Radio Frequency) inputs are generated at the IF (intermediate frequency) output. It is also noted that the sum and differences of the harmonics of the LO and RF are also present at the IF output. Math waveforms on the oscilloscope are used to illustrate the operation of the mixer, and the actual waveforms from the mixer are compared to the math waveforms and the differences are discussed. A detailed description of the operation of the mixer is presented, including the switching action of the diodes. Finally, the frequency components are are expected from the mixer are shown on the spectrum analyzer.

How a Diode Ring Mixer works | Mixer operation theory and measurement - [Link]

18 Aug 2014

Dave explains a big trap in high frequency measurement with your oscilloscope. Based on a viewer request, Dave demonstrates how to incorrectly and then correctly measure the signal output level over frequency of your function generator using your oscilloscope. Some whiteboard transmission line theory is thrown in as well.

EEVblog #652 – Oscilloscope & Function Generator Measurement Trap - [Link]

18 Aug 2014

obr1568_3

New 200mm fans EBM-Papst will cool down your devices while not making a lot of noise.

Maybe you already belong to users of top-level fans from EBM-Papst. This time we bring you another hint for well-proven types – considerably powerful with a 200mm diameter. The types are:

A2E200-AH38-01 – 9 blade fan with sickle-shaped steel blades, driven by a powerful motor M2E-068 BF with power of 64W/ 230V/ 50Hz. Maintenance-free ball bearings and a thermal protection contribute to a long lifetime of the fan. The motor requires to connect an external capacitor 1.5uF/400V. The fan is suitable for a continuous operation (S1) and it can be mounted in any position.

W2E200-HK38-01 – 7 blade fan with a full round nozzle from an aluminium alloy and with same motor unit as above-mentioned type. The fan features a very easy installation – mechanically and also electrically, as it also contains a capacitor (1.5uF) assembled to a body of the fan. The fan is suitable for a continuous operation (S1) and it can be mounted in any position.
Naturally, these fans are universally usable not only for cooling of electric devices, but also in air conditioning (HVAC) and in food industry.

Detailed information will provide you the A2E200-AH38-01 and W2E200-HK38-01 datasheets, as well as operating instructions A2E200-AH38-01 and W2E200-HK38-01.

How do you cool in these hot days? - [Link]

17 Aug 2014

MCP79xx

by embedded-lab.com:

If your design contains Microchip’s MCP79XXX series RTC chips and you are running into troubles using them, this technical brief is intended to resolve several of the commonly-asked questions regarding developing stand-alone serial interface real-time clock/ calendar devices with MCP79XXX. Similarly, there’s also another application note from Microchip which provides detail assistance and guidance in using these RTC devices.

Q&A concerning Microchip’s MCP79XXX RTC chips - [Link]

16 Aug 2014

LED_clock

by embedded-lab.com:

This Instructable describes building of a fun and very simple LED clock using Arduino that displays the time to the nearest half hour using LEDs.

Arduino LED clock - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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