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25 Jan 2011

James Floyd Kelly writes about a cool resource: [via]

Found some GREAT information on Bolt Depot’s homepage, including this printable poster that displays all the different bolts and nuts and connectors along with their official names. Click on the Fastener Tab at the top of the website and there are even more resources, including a great tutorial explaining how fasteners are identified (including how to accurately describe a bolt’s length, type, etc.)

Know your bolts – [Link]

25 Jan 2011

blog.makezine.com writes:

Equations for electronics math are available anywhere. If you have the excellent Maker’s Notebook, with its reference section and a calculator, you can plug in numbers and get answers to many of your circuitry questions. So why learn to do such estimates in your head? Because thinking through questions gives you an intuitive feel for them. It helps you quickly sort and refine ideas before committing physical resources to them.

Math for electronics – [Link]

25 Jan 2011

This project is about interfacing a SNES controller and 16×2 LCD to a PIC16f84A to type out which buttons are pressed.

Interfacing a SNES controller and 16×2 LCD to the PIC16f84A – [Link]

24 Jan 2011

Stephen Zahra writes:

This circuit consists of comparing a fixed beta to that one of the transistor that the user chooses. This circuit consists of two current sources that one of them is on the base of the transistor and the other one is with the collector of the DUT transistor. The collector voltage is then connected to a verification circuit which switch either a red Led (No Go transistor) or a green Led (Go transistor).

Transistor Tester - [Link]


24 Jan 2011

This project is a X-Y plate with a ball on top. The motors control the plate in such a way that the ball always remain on top. This includes controlling of servo motors and visual recognition of the ball using a web camera.

Ball on Plate Control – [Link]

24 Jan 2011

Fabien Royer writes:

As part of a netduino hacking tutorial that I’m authoring with my friend Bertrand, I wrote a set of classes designed to drive an 8×8 LED matrix relying on persistence of vision.

The code and details are located here. The netduino tutorial is located here.

Driving an 8×8 LED matrix with a netduino using persistence of vision – [Link]

24 Jan 2011

Fabien Royer writes:

Programming AVR microcontrollers using ISP is a simple process when the target is on a board exposing a 6 or 10-pin ISP header. But what if you have different types of AVR chips? Their SPI pins (VCC, GND, MOSI, MISO, SCK) aren’t always in the same locations.

Instead of buying different types of target boards or buying an expensive generic programmer, I built one using a small breadboard, a Universal 28 pin ZIF DIP socket and 6 male-male hookup wires that I connected to my USBtinyISP programmer.

Build a cheap, flexible AVR microcontroller programming target board – [Link]

24 Jan 2011

Fabien Royer writes:

A while ago, I bought a LCD117 serial LCD backpack from Modern Device to save a few pins on my Arduino board. Everything worked great because the micro-controller, the serial backpack and the LCD display all required 5 volts for power and logic levels.

But when I tried connecting the serial LCD backpack to a netduino micro-controller, nothing worked: the netduino uses 3.3 volt logic levels while the LCD117 serial backpack expects 5 volt logic levels.

Using a 5 volts serial LCD backpack with a netduino – [Link]

24 Jan 2011

This article discuss the Fluke 233 remote display multimeter in detail. It is a novel design as the display can be removed and it’s True RMS. Check review on the link below.

Fluke 233 Remote Display True RMS Multimeter – [Link]

24 Jan 2011

tronixstuff.wordpress.com writes:

Within this article we are going to examine another new kit available from Freetronics, a company formed to provide many interesting Arduino-based products after the publication of the book “Practical Arduino” by Jonathan Oxer and Hugh Blemings – which in itself is a good read, there are many interesting projects to make and learn from.

Today we examine their answer to “is there a kit version of the TwentyTen Arduino Duemilanove-compatible board?” – by assembling their KitTen. Some people may be wondering why one would want to build a KitTen instead of an assembled unit. Personally I could think of the following reasons:

Freetronics KitTen Arduino-compatible board – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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