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16 Apr 2014

Logic-Pirate-600x450

The Logic Pirate is an inexpensive yet capable open source logic analyzer. For just 30 bucks it can sample 8 channels, 256K samples per channel, at a blazing (overclocked!) 60 MILLION samples per second! It’s designed to support the SUMP logic analyzer protocol on Jawi’s open source software that works on most platforms. [via dangerousprototypes.com]

Logic Pirate 8 channel, 256K sample, 60MSPS logic analyzer - [Link]

16 Apr 2014

MPxd09HML6vJFqS0R8bgb2njgni6Nzhn-600x336

Jakub Felcenloben has received his PCBs as part of our PCB givewaway campaign and there is an update on his miniLOG – Precision Standalone Voltage Logger:

I’m currently testing all the hardware on the board. So far I got the MCU running, managed to talk to the 74HC595. Also the DC-DC converter works quite well, so does the voltage reference.

The board currently uses way too much power, that’s why I need to consider underclocking the microcontroller to 4MHz.

I still need to get the ADC and SD card working, I haven’t had much luck with that so far.

I already have a few ideas on changes I want to make on the board, a blog post about them coming up soon.

UPDATE: miniLOG – Precision Standalone Voltage Logger - [Link]

15 Apr 2014

2013-11-19 14.23.08

Slickstreamer writes:

When we, PinMeTo, moved in to our office at MINC in the beginning of September we only had three keys to four persons and an extra key cost 500 sek so i built an automatic door lock for the door. Maybe cheaper to just buy an extra key but not as fun.

Electric imp automatic door lock - [Link]

15 Apr 2014

datalog328p

karllunt @ www.seanet.com writes:

This is pretty much one of those required projects; everyone builds a datalogger in an Altoids can. But each is different and I enjoyed making mine.

Features:
Uses ATmega328P (low power, 32K flash for lots of program space)
Uses Maxim/Dallas DS1337 Real Time Clock (uses I2C)
Logs data to microSD flash card, readable on PC (uses FAT32)
Runs on two AAA alkaline batteries
Low power draw (exact consumption varies based on SD card used)
Supports RS-232 for entering commands
Uses CR2032 lithium coin cell for RTC backup
Uses Analog Devices TMP36 for temperature sensor (not shown, it gets wired to the green four-position terminal shown below)
Uses SparkFun 3.3VDC boost converter to provide stable voltage even as batteries die

Datalogger in an Altoids can - [Link]


15 Apr 2014

F7EXPUDHTX5K38R.MEDIUM

This instructable explains how to make a simple smoke detector using and Arduino and a Carbon Monoxide Sensor. The sensor is one of the MQ series gas sensors. Check out the demo here.

Arduino Smoke ‘Detector’ using MQ-7 sensor - [Link]

15 Apr 2014

LT8471by Susan Nordyk:

The LT8471, a dual PWM DC/DC converter from Linear Technology, employs two internal 2-A, 50-V switches and an additional 500-mA switch to facilitate step-down, step-up, and inverting conversions. Each 2-A channel can be independently configured as a buck, boost, SEPIC, flyback, Zeta, or inverting converter.

This broad range of topologies and output configurations makes the LT8471 useful for a wide range of industrial and automotive applications. The converter operates from an input voltage of 2.6 V to 50 V, allowing it to be used with input sources ranging from single-cell lithium-ion to automotive batteries.

The LT8471 is capable of generating both positive and negative outputs. Its switching frequency is programmable and synchronizable from 100 kHz to 2 MHz. The device’s 50-V switches achieve overall efficiencies of up to 85% for buck and inverting applications. Operating from a 6-V to 32-V input, the LT8471 delivers up to 1.5 A at 5 V and 650 mA at –5 V.

Housed in a 20-lead, thermally enhanced TSSOP, the LT8471 costs $3.75 each in lots of 1000 units. An industrial-temperature version is priced at $4.13 in like quantities. Both versions are available from stock.

Multiple-topology DC/DC converter integrates dual 2-A switches - [Link]

14 Apr 2014

Print

By Steven Keeping:

Until recently, a lighting designer looking to take advantage of the efficacy, longevity, and robustness of LEDs for his/her next luminaire was faced with some key challenges.

Among the toughest of these was the need to work out how many discrete LEDs were required to achieve the required “lumen density” (light output per unit area) for the product, and then design a circuit board that took into account the power- and thermal-requirements of this array without consuming too much space inside the lamp. Then the engineer needed to make sure that all of the LEDs in the group produced an identical color to meet the consumers’ expectations.

Today, a simpler solution is at hand. LED makers have introduced a new form of packaging for their high-power devices: the chip-on-board (COB) LED array. In supplying these units, the LED maker has done the work of matching the individual LEDs and designing a suitable substrate to carry the “light engine.” Better yet, COB LED arrays allow LED makers to take advantage of efficiency-enhancing techniques such as “remote phosphor”.

This article reviews the latest commercially available examples of COB LED arrays and considers how the sector will develop in the near future.

The Rise of Chip-on-Board LED Modules - [Link]

14 Apr 2014

Tupta_DC-DC_fig1_575x396

by Mary Anne Tupta:

DC-DC converters are widely used components that convert DC power from one voltage to another, producing a regulated output voltage. These devices are used in many electronic products, including laptops, mobile phones, and instrumentation. Like any device, DC-DC converters need to be characterized by manufacturers and by engineers evaluating them for a design.

Given the increased pressure to develop products that consume less power, design engineers are looking for ways to increase power conversion efficiencies. Thus, numerous measurements are required to characterize the electrical parameters of DC-DC converters.

Simplify DC-DC Converter Characterization - [Link]

14 Apr 2014

af5cc2e8959a44fa322f0e3df13f381b-600x337

Here’s an interesting open source project on Kickstarter the Re:Load Pro by Nick Johnson of Arachnid Labs:

A constant current load for testing your projects. 6 amps, 60 volts and 25 watts in a workbench-friendly package with a USB interface.
The Re:Load Pro is an active load. It acts as a current sink, always drawing the same amount of current regardless of the voltage across it.
Active loads are incredibly useful for all sorts of electronics testing requirements. You can use one to see how a power supply performs under load, check if a battery lives up to its manufacturer’s specifications for capacity or current draw, test motor drivers, or a variety of common constant-current tasks, such as testing LEDs, or even doing electroplating. With computer control of the load, you can even do your own IV-curve tracing.

[via]

Re:Load Pro – A DC active load - [Link]

14 Apr 2014

obr1504_1

If you´re deciding, which fan to use in your application, we have for you a good hint.

Better said, we have any “ideas for top-level types” and they have a name in common – EBM Papst. Fans of German company EBM Papst were introduced to you for example in our article Fans able to operate continuously for 30 years. We´re pleased to announce you, that we gradually increase number of stock types, what will hopefully make your choice of a suitable fan easier and it should also help you in the consequent production thanks to an immediate availability.

To the new types recently added to our stock belong for example:

  • 4650N - universal all-metal AC fan (230V/50Hz/19W) with an air flow up to 160 m3/h, Sintec sleeve bearing. Static pressure up to 80 Pa
  • G2E120-AR38-A4 - powerful radial (centrifugal) fan with a massive aluminium body and a galvanized steel impeller. Also suitable for a continuous operation (S1) and it can be mounted in any position. Frequently used type for example at gas heaters etc.
  • W2S130-AA03-01 - universal powerful AC fan (D 150mm, 230V/50Hz/45W) with an air flow of up to 325 m3/h and a static pressure up to 80 Pa. All-metal construction, maintenance-free ball bearings. Also suitable for a continuous operation (S1)

… and other, which can be found below this article.

Detailed information can be found in the datasheets at particular types.

EBM Papst – the highest quality for an acceptable price - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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