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11 Jul 2014

Android-Wear-Tear-Down01_575px

Anandtech tears down the LG G Watch and Samsung Gear Live:

The G Watch turns out to be pretty easy to take apart. There are four Torx T5 screws on the back, removing them gives you access to its internals. The 400mAh battery is integrated into the back cover. ARM’s teardown confirms 3.8V chemistry, resulting in a 1.52Wh total capacity.

The logic board in the Gear Live is a bit more complex. There’s a second layer stacked on the main logic board that also acts as an RF can.

[via]

LG G Watch and Samsung Gear Live Teardowns - [Link]

11 Jul 2014

AnalogIsof1

by Avago Technologies:

Analog isolation is still widely used in motor drives, power monitoring, etc whereby applications typically use inexpensive analog voltage control for speed, intensity or other adjustments.

The HCNR201/200 analog optocoupler is commonly added to isolate the analog signal in the front end module of an application circuitry. The optocoupler will be placed between the analog input and the A/D converter to provide isolation of the analog input from the mixed signal ADC and other digital circuitries. The HCNR201/200 is an excellent solution for many of the analog isolation problems.

Fast analog isolation with linear optocouplers - [Link]

11 Jul 2014

SmartMatrix-Front-600x450

Pup05 shared his SmartMatrix project. He writes:

The panel fits perfectly, just had to shim it with a little bit of folded card stock on each side. There’s plenty of room for the Teensy and SmartMatrix board, wiring, SD card, etc. I cut out a piece of white printer paper to size, and placed it between the panel and the glass for a bit of diffusion. The magnetic feet that came with my panel from Adafruit fit perfectly, and keep the panel pushed against the paper and glass. I cut a notch in the bottom of the back, just big enough for the power cord, USB cable, and IR receiver.
I loaded up Craig’s LightAppliance sketch and made a few minor modifications, loaded up my SD card with the animated GIFs I wanted, and everything works great. Unfortunately, I already had my Teensy soldered on to the SmartMatrix board, and didn’t feel like pulling it off to solder the RTC crystal on to the back. I might do that later, and add the temperature sensor.

SmartMatrix project - [Link]

11 Jul 2014

FDVXCL4HX7P6P7Q.LARGE

Here’s a cool Mini LED volume towers project by Ben Finio. He writes a complete step-by-step instructions here:

The inspiration for this project started when I saw a variety of awesome stereo LED towers on YouTube (also referred to as VU meters). Many of the videos showed the end result, and maybe a slideshow of the assembly process, but lacked complete build details or a circuit diagram. So, I set out to find out how they worked, and build my own “mini” desktop version that would go nicely with computer speakers, instead of a big living room stereo. This Instructable will give you complete directions to assemble the required circuit (even if you have no electronics experience – you can even do it without soldering), build two LED towers, and hook them up to an audio input so you can simultaneously drive them and listen to music.

[via]

Mini LED volume towers (VU meters) - [Link]


11 Jul 2014

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Mr.Fishers3 @ instructables.com writes:

Ever looked at a lightbulb and thought that doesn’t look too complicated, I bet I could make one? With this Instructable you can!

This lightbulb is made entirely out of simple, mostly household materials requiring very little in special equipment. The basic construction includes a glass jar filled with CO2 and a graphite filament(Pencil Lead). This makes it a carbon filament bulb analogous to those made by Edison before tungsten became the norm.

Homemade Lightbulb - [Link]

11 Jul 2014

H

by elektor.com:

Trulife Optics together with the National Physics Laboratory has demonstrated a new type of transparent head-up display device. According to Simon Hall, lead scientist of Adaptive Optics at the NPL the new technology is unlike existing solutions: “Google’s solution is effectively a prism; it’s like a half-silvered mirror that you’re looking into and the Epson Moverio uses an embedded, slightly different refractive index component in a very thick lens which is reflecting light travelling through the rather thick waveguide”.

This new component is set to transform the development of wearable augmented reality and head-up display devices. Jonathan Lewis, CEO at Trulife optics commented that, “The development of wearable augmented reality devices has been curtailed by the lack of an optical component that allows for the overlay of high-definition, full colour images. But with the launch of our optic, we are providing that missing piece in the augmented reality jigsaw.”

Novel Wearable Optical Display - [Link]

11 Jul 2014

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Tom Cousins of DOAYEE made this DIY nixie tube clock:

Below is the schematic for the project, as you can see I’m using 6 IN12 nixie tubes, each with it’s own 74141 nixie tube driver. These drivers are great! They simply connect directly to the nixies and display whatever 4 bit binary number you give them (if you give them anything above 9 they blank the display – hence why I use the number 10 in my code to blank the nixies). Because they take in a simple 4 bit binary number, I can hook them directly up to some shift registers to drive them, in my case I used 3 74HC595 shift registers (available everywhere), because they can be “daisy chained” together, meaning in the code I only have to write one 24 bit binary number and it will display all 6 numbers on the nixies. Though in reality I split them up into pairs and write three 8 bit binary numbers.

[via]

Nixie tube clock - [Link]

10 Jul 2014

F2x600

by Steve Taranovich @ www.edn.com:

Freescale Semiconductor introduced the MM9Z1J638, AEC-Q100 qualified intelligent battery sensors with three measurement channels, a 16/32-bit MCU and a CAN protocol module in one 7 x 7 mm 48-pin QFN package.

The market this product serves is quite diversified with 12 V lead acid batteries, 14 V Li-Ion batteries, Lead acid multi-batteries, HV battery junction box, Energy Storage Systems (ESS), Uninterrupted Power Systems (UPS) and industrial automation.

Today’s trends in the battery market include complex battery algorithms, higher communication data rates with the CAN bus, better safety for Li-Ion batteries and increased mission-critical dependence on energy availability.

Start-stop requirements, together with others such as regenerative braking and intelligent alternator control, are driving demand for more precise sensing of the battery’s state to provide early failure warnings.

Intelligent battery sensor for automotive and industrial - [Link]

10 Jul 2014

obr1554_1

There´s only one original, even though with a fake, it´s possible to “gain” also something unwanted – hours of debugging and costs for exchange.

Copying of products and components is perhaps as old as an industrial production is. Logically – it´s easier to jump up to a “running train” (to copy a renowned product) than to develop something new. Everyone, who develops an electronic device probably can confirm, that it´s demanding and expensive. Similarly it´s also at development of chips. Well known and widely used chips for a USB interface . from company FTDI belong to the most popular on the market. No wonder, that it´s fakes appeared on the market, with the same appearance as an original (on the first sight). Despite the fact, that the price of the FT232RL chip is relatively very affordable, a vision of a cheaper purchase was certainly attractive though expensively paid at the end.

On the enclosed photo, there´s an original on the left side and the fake on the right side. It´s visible, that the original has a laser engraved marking, while the fake has it only printed. But that wouldn´t be a problem… Fake worked so-so well until the time, when FTDI upgraded drivers with a utility able to detect fake products. In case of fake, the USB communication fails (sends only zeroes).

On the enclosed photo, there´s an original on the left side and the fake on the right side. It´s visible, that the original has a laser engraved marking, while the fake has it only printed. But that wouldn´t be a problem… Fake worked so-so well until the time, when FTDI upgraded drivers with a utility able to detect fake products. In case of fake, the USB communication fails (sends only zeroes).

The result is clear in this case – exchange of non-working fakes from target devices (from customers! is significantly more expensive that a usage of an original would be. And how to be certain about the authenticity of the component? – by a purchase from an authorized distributor. SOS electronic is already for many years an authorized distributor of FTDI with a close cooperation and an above-standard technical support.

Be aware of the FTDI chips fakes - [Link]

10 Jul 2014

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Chris Holden of NerdClub shares his tips on how he successfully program an ATMega128:

Finally got an ATMega128 chip coded and programmed successfully. The great news is it doesn’t require Arduino. The even better news is, we can use Oshonsoft to write the code! Yay.

[via]

Programming an ATMega128 - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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