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8 Nov 2014

obr1616_p559

Find out the WunderBar – the OpenSensor Cloud Platform enabling to easily develop applications for the physical world.

The WunderBar IoT (Internet of Things) Starter Kit from company relayr mimics the appearance of a chocolate bar with a WiFi enabled master module, plus six detachable smart sensor mini-modules.

The WunderBar Internet of Things WiFi & Bluetooth Sensor Starter Kit is a quick start development tool for software application developers unfamiliar with complex wireless hardware designing, and a complete open-source wireless hardware reference design. WunderBar provides to hardware design engineers an out-of-the-box development tool that helps users get started quickly building, inventing, developing, and experimenting with Internet of Things senor based designs using WiFi and BLE senor applications.

Made of seven modules, the WunderBar main module is fitted with an ARM Cortex ‘M’ micro -processor, which connects to the internet through the WiFi unit. Bluetooth Low energy is used to communicate with the other modules. All of the activity that happens around the WunderBar is sent to the WunderBar platform, where you can easily access and work with the signals.

Break, place and program

It works right out of the box. It is energy efficient, fast, secure and designed for developers, makers and manufacturers.
WunderBar has six powerful smart modules, each equipped with its own Bluetooth Low Energy (Beacon) processors and battery that can power the units for up to a year. Light / Color / Proximity, Gyroscope / Accelerometer, Thermometer / Humidity, IR Transmitter (remote control), A connector to the easy Grove System of Sensors and Actuators that are all Arduino compatible and a Noise/Sound sensor. The Starter Kit has available for download various software development kits (SDKs) for iOS, Android and Node.js. including test Apps which can be downloaded from relayr.io. Libraries for node.js, python and more will be supported soon.

WunderBar is the easiest way to create innovative and useful apps to connect smart devices without needing to learn about hardware. App developers can quickly access data from the physical world with WunderBar’s easy-to-use SDKs for iOS, Android and Node.js or with our simple REST API.
Because the WunderBar is still a dev kit, with a little bit of knowledge, and the exposed GPIO pads, you can make almost anything you want smarter. More info at: www.relayr.io/wunderbar The WunderBar will soon be our standard stock item.


WunderBar brings things to life and to internet - [Link]

8 Nov 2014

AS5601

by elektor.com:

The Company AMS AG has introduced the non-contact AS5601 Hall-based rotary magnetic position encoding chip. It works by sensing changes in the magnetic field components perpendicular to the surface of the chip and converts field changes into voltages to produce incremental A/B outputs and absolute position information that can be read over an I²C bus. Analog signals from the built-in Hall sensors are amplified and filtered before conversion to binary values. A hardwired CORDIC block (Coordinate Rotation Digital Computer) calculates the angle and magnitude of the magnetic field vector. Magnetic field intensity is used by the automatic gain control (AGC) to adjust the amplification level which compensates for temperature and magnetic field variations.

New Rotary Encoder - [Link]

7 Nov 2014

FL0954NHHTE0PGU.MEDIUM

by MidnightMaker @ instructables.com:

This is a Solar Tracker. A full size, internet cloud connected, smartphone accessible Solar Tracker built mainly from 2x4s and plywood, employing wooden peg gears, recycled curtain poles, nuts, bolts and threaded rod. The solar tracker uses a home built electronic controller incorporating WiFi, stepper motor drives, accelerometer and magnetometer. The tracker was designed to drive a full size 90W panel in azimuth and elevation. The gears driving the tracker are wooden peg gears commonly used in the 16th century. The gears were designed using modern 3D CAD (Solidworks). Connecting the wooden peg gears to the internet cloud just seemed like the right thing to do. This is not a waterproof design – you will need to consider modifications to waterproof your derivative design.

Solar Tracker in the Internet Cloud - [Link]

7 Nov 2014

DSC02097

by myhobbyprojects.com:

All parts were developed separately. This allowed adjustments in the assembly as well as smaller changes in case the design of one or other part become required.

Focus on low cost and use of materials easily accessible in the local market.

Homemade Plotter (CNC Machine) - [Link]


7 Nov 2014

HF-LPT100_or_USR-WIFI232-T_connected_to_arduino_sm

by 2xod.com:

The Arduino’s greatest weakness is also it’s greatest triumph. That is, it is only a low power simple processor, which makes internet connectivity for such a simple device difficult. Often the network interface has a few orders of magnitude greater performance than the arduino atmel avr processor itself.

Arduino Yun is the answer to wifi connectivity for arduino. Ushering in a new era known as the internet of things, Yun is actually a complete 400mhz system on chip. There is irony in the fact that the powerful system on chip’s only duty is to serve the lowly AVR. Akin to “You Pass Butter”

Arduino Wifi With Hi Flying HF-LPT100 - [Link]

7 Nov 2014

collage-600x332

Colin over at CuPID Controls writes:

We want to put our remote sense and control modules out into the wild and read and aggregate them as it makes sense.
Our basic system layout is as below. We’ve got multiple wireless nodes that broadcast data periodically, and a controller/aggregator that will log this data, acknowledge receipt, and do something useful with it. Eventually, we may have intermediate powered nodes that serve to mesh the grid out, but for now, our nodes just send data to the controller.
We’re currently using these awesome little RF units, called Moteinos. They are an Arduino clone that can use the standard IDE with their bootloader. They’ve got the ever-so-popular ATMega328P chip that is familiar to anybody working with an Arduino Nano or Uno.

[via]

Adventures in Moteino: Remote temperature monitor - [Link]

7 Nov 2014

Tektronix-RSA306-652

by elektor.com:

In a break with tradition Textronix have announced their first USB-based item of test equipment. The RSA306 is a spectrum analyzer with a 9 kHz to 6.2 GHz frequency range and a 40 MHz instantaneous bandwidth. According to the press release this is just the first of many test instruments the firm will be launching which takes advantage of the availability of affordable desktop computers and laptops with sufficient processing power to handle complex test and measurement analysis along with high-speed USB 3.0 interfaces.

Tektronix USB Spectrum Analyzer - [Link]

7 Nov 2014

SC16C2552BIA44

With the rapid development of GPS (Global Positioning System) techniques, GPS gets wider application in many fields. GPS has features such as high precision, global coverage, convenience, high quality, and low cost. Recently, the use of GPS extends speedily from military to civilian applications such as automobile navigation systems which combine the GPS system, e-map, and wireless network. GPS is getting popular, and the market for GPS techniques is extending continuously.

UARTs provide serial asynchronous receive data synchronization, parallel-to-serial and serial-to-parallel data conversion for both the transmitter and receiver sections. These functions are necessary for converting the serial data stream into parallel data that is required with digital systems. Synchronization for the serial data stream is accomplished by adding start and stop bits to the transmit data to form a data character. Data integrity is ensured by attaching a parity bit to the data character. The parity bit is checked by the receiver for any transmission bit errors.

The circuit describes how to combine GPS into a navigation system by using a Philips 2-channel UART, the SC16C2552B. The SC16C2552B is a two channel Universal Asynchronous Receiver and Transmitter (UART) used for serial data communications. Its principal function is to convert parallel data into serial data, and vice versa. The UART can handle serial data rates up to 5 Mbit/s.

UART in GPS navigation system – [Link]

6 Nov 2014

obr1614_1

Universal Soft shell connectors MATE-N-LOK from company TE Conectivity belong to the best, what can be found on the market.

In industrial applications we need various connectors. “Various” usually means really various -almost indefinite amount of types, to have a hope to find the right type for our application in a given series of connectors.

High chance for success at searching for a suitable connector provides a group of connector „Soft shell“ from company TE Connectivity. In this group can be found the above mentioned series MATE-N-LOK, which can be securely marked as an industry standard. Series MATE-N-LOK is a four-component system consisting of 2 contacts (pin+socket) and from the connector housings (F+M).

MATE-N-LOK system of connectors provides two basic things usually expected from a connector – reliable contact and a mechanically stable connection of both connector parts. When we add to this an easy assembly and a huge amount of versions, we have a series which gives a presumption, that with these connectors can be solved majority of connections inside a given device. Standard versions, but also versions with sealing (IP56/57), circular, colored, panel/ PCB mount … all these are possibilities of one family. In one line can be 2-10 positions, in a 6-15 matrix.
Connectors have a high current handling capability of 19A/600V and a high-temperature housing material(nylon UL 94-V2/V0) also contributes to overall connector reliability.

A comprehensive overview of „Soft-shell“ connectors TE Connectivity can be found in following catalogue.

Connect and lock – connectors MATE-N-LOK - [Link]

6 Nov 2014

FMFOE1OI236UGEL.MEDIUM

by ohneschuh @ instructables.com:

Capacitive sensors are an elegant way to control an Arduino using the Capacitive Sensing Library. But the sensitivity and error tolerance depend strongly on the hardware (sensor) design. I found a design guideline here and tested different setups which mostly work well if the Arduino was powered by battery. But the sensor signal changes dramatically if I connect the Arduino to a power supply.

Actually I found a design for five (and more) sensors which works well powered with battery and power supply.

Capacitive Sensor Design - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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