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22 May 2014

FXA3HI9HUIWKA3Y.LARGE

singingshark @ instructables.com writes:

Welcome! For our Environmental Capstone class (senior thesis) for St. Olaf College we built a monitor that would effectively monitor how much water a shower uses. For our project we made four different monitors using the same process. This instructable is written as if you were to make a single water monitor. [...]

Shower Monitor Arduino with LCD display - [Link]

22 May 2014

temperature-logger-circuit

praveen @ circuitstoday.com posted a project on a Temperature logger using Arduino:

This project is about a simple USB temperature logging system using arduino uno and the serial monitor function in the arduino IDE. The system monitors the temperature every 2 seconds and shows it on the arduino serial monitor. The temperature is shown in °Celsius and °Fahrenheit. The system is interfaced to the PC through the USB port. LM35 is used as the temperature sensor.

LM35 is three terminal linear temperature sensor from National semiconductors. It can measure temperature from-55c to +150C. The voltage output of the LM35 increases 10mV per degree Celsius rise in temperature. LM35 can be operated from a 5V supply and the stand by current is less than 60uA. The pin out of LM35 is shown in the figure below.

Temperature logger using Arduino - [Link]

22 May 2014

Print

By Panasonic

Capacitors may seem simple enough, but specifying them has actually grown more complex in recent years. The reason why comes down to freedom of choice. The universe of capacitors has expanded greatly over the past few years, in large part because of capacitor designs that take advantage of advances in conductive polymers.

These advanced capacitors sometimes use conductive polymers to form the entire electrolyte; or the conductive polymers can be used in conjunction with a liquid electrolyte in a design known as a hybrid capacitor. Either way, these polymer-based capacitors offer a performance edge over conventional electrolytic and ceramic capacitors. [...]

The various polymer and hybrid capacitors have distinct sweet spots in terms of their ideal voltages, frequency characteristics, environmental conditions, and other application requirements. In this article, we will show you how to identify the best uses for each type of advanced capacitor. We will also highlight specific applications in which a polymer or hybrid capacitor will outperform traditional electrolytic or ceramic capacitors.

Understanding Polymer and Hybrid Capacitors - [Link]

22 May 2014

article-2014may-dcdc-converter-topologies-fig1

By Ashok Bindra:

Whether it is used for biasing avalanche photodiodes (APDs) found in optical receivers, driving photoflash tubes in flash cameras, or charging high-voltage capacitors, the need for high-voltage sources continues to grow. Consequently, in battery-powered units where the input supply voltage is low, step-up or boost DC/DC converters are required to generate voltages that can be several times the input. To address these requirements, suppliers such as Analog Devices, Linear Technology, Maxim Integrated, and Micrel Inc., among others, have produced boost converters with output voltages at 70 V and above.

DC/DC Converter Topologies and Techniques to Obtain High Boost Ratios - [Link]


22 May 2014

homemade_pickup_winder_02-600x450

A DIY guitar pickup winding machine built on ATmega8 by Davide Gironi:

A pickup winding machine it is used to wind a guitar pickup.
The core of this project is an ATmega8.
It features:
wind counter
slow startup
automatic stop
configurable motor speed
configurable winds
2 directions

This winder has an LCD display that will show
the current motor direction
the rotating speed of your pickup
the total and current wind counter

[via]

A pickup winding machine built on an ATmega8 - [Link]

22 May 2014

obr1527_1

Connectors M.2 also called as NGFF have a chance to become a widely used standard in computers, communication equipment and M2M applications.

The newest member of the data connectors family in our offer are connectors Attend series 123, so called NGFF – New Generation Form Factor connectors, also known as „M.2“. Their main advantage is implementation of PCI Express 3.0, Serial ATA 3.0 and USB 3.0. buses into one connector. The connector is considerable miniaturized and at the length of only 21.8 mm it has up to 75 pins ( 0.5mm pitch/ 50V/0,5A). M.2/ NGFF are designed as a future standard for SSD memory media, WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS/GNSS, NFC and other modules. As it´s not a “specialty” of one producer but it´s a connector designed as an international standard, their usage in your device can be advantageous thanks to a supposed easy availability even in the future. An important fact is, that connectors are produced with various keying (A-M). That provides a possibility to differentiate various modules on one board and prevents improper connection (PCIe x2, PCIe x4,…).

M.2 connectors are designed for a direct insertion of PCB, i.e. one part of a connection (M) is a PCB and another part is the connector (F). Connectors support various PCB widths – 12, 16, 22 and 30 mm. Depending on a type, M.2 connectors also enable a double-sided assembly of components on a PCB.

Another novelties from the Attend production in our stock are interesting types for SIM cards, as well as combinations 2xSIM(115L-AB380), 2XSIM + uSD (115M-AB360) and other, which can be found below this article.

Will a New Generation Form Factor become a new standard? - [Link]

21 May 2014

The Narrative Clip is an automatic lifelogging camera you clip to your shirt, bag, or anything else. What’s inside this charming little square? [via]

Narrative Clip Teardown - [Link]

21 May 2014

Stanford researchers, lead by electrical engineer Ada Poon, are working on midfield wireless power for medical implants, ranging in application from nerve stimulation to medication delivery. [via]

Midfield Wireless Power for Implants - [Link]

21 May 2014

rig_circuit

OK, this isn’t very innovative, but it’s still a fun weekend project. The setup starts with a transfer pipette, with a tiny hole made on top so that any water inside will slowly drip. This is followed by a jury-rigged optointerrupter: a fairly standard IR diode, a matched phototransistor, two 5 mm nylon spacers, top half of a polypropylene beaker, and copious amounts of hot-melt glue. The diode is connected to +5V through a 220 Ω resistor; the phototransistor uses a 10 kΩ one, in the usual topology. That’s good enough to detect the light that gets refracted by a passing drop of water.

Catching Drops of Water  - [Link]

21 May 2014

workshop_org_windows811-600x312

Dilshan Jayakody writes:

Workshop Organizer is light-weight, cross platform inventory controller for home-workshops. This application is specifically design to manage electronic/electrical components at home-workshops, but it can use to manage other areas of workshop including tools, machinery and mechanical components, etc.
To store data, this application use SQLite database system and all the necessary runtime libraries for SQLite is available with the “Workshop Organizer” package. User may not need to download or install separate SQLite database system to use this application. Workshop Organizer default SQLite database consist with more than 600 reference data including list of manufacturers and types.

[via]

Workshop Organizer – inventory controller for home-workshops - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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