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16 Sep 2014

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By Christian Granvillano @ open-electronics.org:

Today we’ll explain how to exploit the potential of Arduino as a programmable logic controller, connecting it to appropriate interfaces for I/O.

The PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) has been and still is the basic component of the industrial automation world. The Industrial application made the PLC systems being very expensive, both to buy and repair, and also because of the highly specific skills requested to software designers to extract the maximum potentials from controllers. Arduino is a kind of universal programmable controller, although it is only the “core” and in any case it has been built for general applications; with a little of external hardware (essentially interfaces capable of transferring signals from sensors and to actuators, reducing the EMI which may damage the microcontroller) and an appropriate software may, however, become something very similar to a PLC.

Arduino as a programmable logic controller (PLC) - [Link]

15 Sep 2014

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By Colin Jeffrey @ gizmag.com:

Scientists working at the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences (SIMES) claim to have created a molecule-sized electronic component just a few nanometers long that conducts electricity in only the one direction. In essence, a rectifier diode, but one so small that it may one day help replace much bulkier diodes and other semiconductors found on today’s integrated circuits to produce incredibly compact, super-fast electronic devices.

Created using two unconventional types of carbon – Buckminsterfullerene (aka buckyballs, spherical molecules of carbon in a fused-ring structure) and diamondoids (microminiature nanoscale carbon cage molecules that are incredibly strong) – the resultant “buckydiamondoids” exhibit asymmetric conductance when an electric current is applied. That is, they act just like diodes in conducting electricity in one direction, but block it if it is applied from the other direction.

Buckyballs and diamondoids combined to create molecule-sized diode - [Link]

15 Sep 2014

Javier from CookingHacks writes:

We made a step by step article about how to track vehicles using Arduino + GPRS / GPS. Then we integrated the information using the Google Maps API. All the code is available with open source license.

Realtime GPS+GPRS tracking of vehicles using Arduino - [Link]

14 Sep 2014

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Researchers say they have captured the sound of a single moving atom.

Researchers at Columbia University and Sweden’s Chalmers University of Technology say that they have, for the first time, “captured” the sound a single atom makes when it moves around—a single “phonon,” as it were. It’s an achievement that could eventually be used as the basic science for new quantum computing devices.

Like everyone is taught in elementary school, anytime something moves or vibrates, it makes a sound. Scientists now know for sure that that principle extends down to the lowly atom.

“The sound amplitude, or strength, is very weak,” said Göran Johansson, a co-author of the paper published today in Science. “Basically, when you excite the atom, it creates a sound, one phonon at a time, according to theory. It’s the weakest possible sound possible at the frequency [that it vibrates].”

Scientists Have Captured the Sound One Atom Makes - [Link]


14 Sep 2014

Electrostatic_motor

by elektor.com:

Conventional electric motors rely on the forces of electro magnetism to provide motion. An item in the UW-Madison news letter announced that a motor is under development at the headquarters of C-Motive Technologies which uses the force of electric fields.

According to Dan Ludois, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the UW and co-founder of C-Motive Technologies “We have proven the concept of a new motor that uses electric fields rather than magnetic fields to transform electricity into a rotary force, the distinction may sound minor, but it could solve a number of practical problems while saving money”

An Electrostatic Motor - [Link]

13 Sep 2014

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by Jose Daniel Herrera:

Here I present another project based on a addressable LEDs strip, based on WS2812b leds.

It consists of an ‘electronic’ candle, which lets you select set colors, adjust the intensity, and have different effects like rainbow, fade and fire. The project arose from the purchase of an IKEA lantern model BORBY … the idea was to replace a candle of considerable size, for something more … modern.

Candle with remote control and Arduino Pro Mini - [Link]

13 Sep 2014

IMG_1187-Copy

Matt of SkyLabs has a nice build log about a temperature controlled reflow oven he built using an Arduino based PID controller and a standard toaster oven:

We have successfully managed to build a temperature controlled reflow oven using an Arduino based PID controller and a standard toaster oven from Robert Dyas! This is a must have accessory for any hobbyist who regularly uses surface mount components within their designs. Below we have a build log documenting the process of constructing the oven including:
Teardown of the original oven
Custom enclosure construction
Control Methods
Arduino Installation

So to start off I will outline a basic parts list of what I used:
Arduino Uno
Reflow Oven Shield
Solid State Relay
K-Type Thermocouple
230v AC to 5v DC Power Supply
Custom Laser Cut Enclosure

[via]

Temperature controlled reflow oven build - [Link]

13 Sep 2014

Charles Edward Pax has announced that the T400 temperature datalogger is now being offered on Kickstarter!

The Pax Instruments T400 datalogger is an open source four-channel thermocouple temperature datalogger based on the Arduino™ Leonardo platform. It is ready to use out of the box with the features you want most. Measurements can be logged to MicoSD card, printed to serial port, and graphed. The T400 is a great tool for anything from live thermal process monitoring in the lab to long-term environmental data collection in the field.

[via]

Data logger handles four thermocouples - [Link]

13 Sep 2014

by mjlorton @ youtube:

I go through the design and operation of the college power supply project. There is one minor error that still needs to be corrected but I think we are very close to a final design.

DIY Bench Power Supply #5 – Circuit Design and Operation - [Link]

13 Sep 2014

by TheSignalPathBlog @ youtube:

In this episode Shahriar takes a close look at some of Dino-Lite’s USB Digital Microscopes and accessories. Two of the microscope stand offerings from Dino-Lite are demoed (model MS36B and RK-10) with a close look at their features and usability. All USB stands offer precision Aluminum bodies and flexible ranges of motion for a variety of viewing angles and distances.

Three USB Digital Microscopes from Dino-Lite are also demoed: models AM4113ZTL Dino-Lite Premier, AM4515ZTL Dino-Lite Edge and AM4815ZTL Dino-Lite Edge. These microscopes offers features such as large magnification combined with long working distances, adjustable polarizer, adaptable cap design, MicroTouch shutter button, extended depth of field (EDOF), extended dynamic range (EDR) and automatic magnification reading (AMR) which are all compatible with the provide DinoCapture 2.0 interface software.

Using Dino-Lite’s microscopes, a variety of electronics components are presented: An Analog Devices PCB containing 0102 footprint components, A PIC UV erasable Silicon die, a 325GHz horn antenna, a composite wafer probe with 150um pitch from GGB industries. Finally, the complete breakdown of a QuinStar mm-wave PA module is shown with microwave filters, pre-amplifiers, and a Wilkinson-based GaAs PA as a final stage.

Dino-Lite USB Digital Microscopes Review and Experiments - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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