Home Blog  





6 Sep 2014

FYF3GCGHOHY6T61.MEDIUM

by BrittLiv @ instructables.com:

Heating things up is one of the most performed tasks in a lab. Quite a lot of times it is not enough to simply hold something at a certain temperature, but the rate at which something is heated and for how long is just as important. Especially when you try to develop catalysts for chemical processes, the temperature program and exact temperature control is crucial and you probably do not want to stay in the lab for 16 hours to manually adapt your temperature program. Unfortunately, programmable temperature controllers that can automate processes are really expensive. So I decided to build a highly customizable controller that is able to run temperature ramps and read multiple different temperature programs from a SD card. It also provides a logging function on the SD card that allows you to evaluate the resulting temperature profile after running a program.

Programmable Temperature Controller + Hot Plate - [Link]

6 Sep 2014

servo_header

Ondřej Karas of DoItWireless writes:

We described simple method, how to drive modellers servo. Today, we are going to try to drive this servo from potentiometer connected to TR module ADC. It is reaction to forum thread where is discussion about airplane model control possibility.

[via]

Wireless servo controller II - [Link]

6 Sep 2014

Freeing the Lepton from its Iphone prison!

The smallest thermal imager - [Link]

6 Sep 2014

master_clock_16a

by embedded-lab.com:

Brett’s new masterclock is Arduino-controlled and keeps very accurate time by periodically synchronizing with the DCF77 “Atomic” Clock in Mainflingen near Frankfurt, Germany. The DCF77  library for Arduino is used to decode the time signal broadcasted from the atomic clock. The time is displayed as hours, minutes, and seconds on six 1″ seven segment LEDs. A 4×20 I2C LCD display is also used in the project to display additional info such as display brightness, sync information, signal quality, auto tune’d frequency, auto tuned quartz accuracy, etc. Both the displays are auto-dimmed based on the surrounding light intensity using an LDR sensor and pulse width modulation technique. His clock also includes a bluetooth link for updating the Arduino firmware from a PC without an USB cable.

Very accurate master clock synchronized to the DCF77 time signal - [Link]


6 Sep 2014

USBtinny84-Header-600x200

Rupert Hirst writes:

My through hole, home etch friendly version of the surface mount FabISP, which is based around the USBtinyISP AVR ISP Programmer. The new USBtinyISP drivers also support for Windows 8
This design uses the ATtiny84 microcontroller instead of the larger ATtiny2313 of the USBtiny.

[via]

ATtiny84 USBtiny AVR ISP programmer - [Link]

5 Sep 2014

Tape_Head_Pre-Amplifier_A

The circuit is built around a popular Sanyo’s stereo head preamp IC LA3161. Low electrical signals from the playback heads are fed to pins 1 and 8 of IC1 via DC decoupling capacitors, respectively. Components between pins 2 and 3 and pins 6 and 7 provide adequate equalization to the signals for a normal tape playback.

Tape Head Pre-Amplifier - [Link]

5 Sep 2014

salae

Who says logic analyzers canʼt be beautiful?  Saleaeʼs Logic USB Logic Analyzer packs a lot of punch in a small, anodized aluminum package.

The analyzer:

  • Monitors up to 8 channels
  • Saves up to 10 billion samples
  • Is multi-platform Windows, Mac or Linux
  • Can export data in binary, VCD and CSV
  • Supports I2C, Async Serial, SPI, 1-Wire, CAN, I2S, PCM, and UNI/O

Used by students, engineers and hobbyists, Saleaeʼs analyzers have been used for satellites, avionics, submarines, electric cars, and more.

And with the launch of the Saleae Logic 4, 8, Pro 8 and Pro 16 next month, recording, measuring, and annotating will be even easier.

Saleae Launches New Logic 4, 8, Pro 8, and Pro 16 Analyzers - [Link]

5 Sep 2014

Use-Sublime-Text-2-to-Replace-Arduino-IDE

by Kathy Yang @ elecfreaks.com:

We could often feel frustrated when programming using the Arduino IDE. Why? Not because of how many errors we encounter in the program, but it is so difficult to find out the errors in source code, which is really something freaking out. For example Arduino IDE does not seem to display the number of rows, the prompt window can show us in which line the error occurs, but we just have no ideas where the line it is. If you can double click to find exact position of that line, then we will not care about which line it is: line 1 or line 10. But that just hasn’t happened. What’s worse, it cannot change the display font, which reads clumsy or neither too small or unclear enough, as a consequence, seriously affecting the efficiency of our programming. So I wanted to transfer to another editor and the new editor had better be able to take the place of the Arduino IDE completely. Then I found the Sublime Text 2. Here take a look at the overall interface of it.

Use Sublime Text 2 to Replace Arduino IDE - [Link]

5 Sep 2014

GguckxTl-600x450

Here’s Aon’s finished project the ytimer a visual feedback timer:

A countdown timer with super bright 7-segment displays that flash when the time is up, instead (or in addition to) an audible alarm.
The design is based on a PIC16F886 microcontroller which drives the displays using a TLC5916 LED driver and dual P-channel MOSFETs. A rotary encoder with a push button is used for input, in addition to two microswitches, one for power and one for toggling sound. The sound switch also toggles a green 0603 indicator LED.
The device is powered from two AAA batteries, which will hopefully deliver adequate battery life.

[via]

ytimer, visual feedback timer - [Link]

5 Sep 2014

If you’re into electronics, engineering and making things move, you’ll need a good handle on electric actuators. Use this beginner’s guide to electric actuators before you set out to purchase your first actuator.

What is An Actuator?

Before linear electric actuators were around, the only way to make a robot move forward was to use rotary actuators. Linear actuators changed all that. When it comes to electric actuators, you’ve got two main choices: lead screw and ball screw. You’ve really got a ton of choices, like peizo-electric, and there are a ton of innovations happening right now, but for this article, we’ll stick to the basics.

Lead Screw Actuators

Lead screw actuators use a threaded lead screw and a nut to create motion. The gear system runs, turning the screw moving it along the nut.

Here’s a quick diagram to illustrate the idea.

1

Read the rest of this entry »



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits